T&C Surf Glenn Minami Twin Fin: Price Checks

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ve got a quick check in on a very cool board: a T&C Surf Glenn Minami twin fin from 1978. Put your wallets away, though, because the eBay auction is already done and dusted. All photos in the site are via eBay; you can find the original listing here.

T&C Surf Glenn Minami Twin Fin 1.jpg

I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: as much as everyone loves the 80s T&C Surf boards, I think the earlier single fins and twin fins are a bit underrated. As is always the case with noteworthy surfboard labels, T&C Surf Designs has its foundation in the combo of talented craftsmen and gifted surfers. According to T&C’s website, T&C Surf founder Craig Sugihara was inspired after riding a Mark Richards twin fin during the early 70s. Sugihara then enlisted Glenn Minami to continue to iterate on the design. Shortly thereafter, Dane Kealoha joined the roster and the rest is history.

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As for the T&C Surf Glenn Minami board you see here, it measures in at 5’8″ x 20″ x 2 3/4″. According to the seller it was shaped in 1978, during the relatively early days of the Town & Country label. Overall the board looks to be in pretty good condition, although it looks like the swallowtail underwent some surgery. The board is super colorful and eye-catching, and while it’s not quite as crazy as the neon airbrushes that would define T&C’s look in the 80s, I really dig it. In particular, the fins are a super cool touch, especially with T&C’s classic yin yang logo on them.

And yes, this is a Price Checks entry, so you know we’re going to discuss the price tag on this bad boy. The final price was $860. This is a shade lower than what I would have guessed, but even so, it’s a healthy price for a forty year old board. The board looks to be in good condition aside from the aforementioned work on the tail. The T&C Surf Glenn Minami twin fin is no longer for sale but you can check out the eBay listing here.

Finally, Glenn Minami continues to shape surfboards today. He shapes under his own name, rather than the T&C Surf label, and you can find more about Glenn’s boards on his website or follow him on Instagram.

Weekend Grab Bag: Donald Takayama Scorpion & More

Greetings, Shredderz! By now you should know the drill: it’s the latest edition of the Weekend Grab Bag, where I spotlight some great boards I have seen listed for sale. As always, all of the postings are live as of the time the blog post was published. Onto the fresh batch of vintage sticks, beginning with a Donald Takayama Scorpion in clean condition.

Donald Takayama Scorpion (Craigslist San Diego)

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The Donald Takayama Scorpion just might be one of the most famous models from Takayama’s long and distinguished shaping career. The vast majority of Takayama Scorpions I have seen are the epoxy versions, which were obviously not hand shaped by DT. (For what it’s worth, I borrowed a friend’s epoxy Donald Takayama egg once and absolutely loved it.) The Scorpion featured above is 7’4″ x 22″ x 2 7/8″ and the seller is asking $800. Takayama himself signed the board in pencil on the stringer. I have also heard that some of these later-era DT boards were shaped with the assistance of a shaping machine. I would guess this board is late 90s to early 2000s, given the FCS fin boxes for the side bites. Either way I think this is a nice price for a very cool board.

Vintage Skip Frye Fish (Craigslist San Diego)

Vintage Skip Frye Fish 6'6" .jpg

The seller claims this vintage Skip Frye fish hasn’t been surfed in at least twenty years. As for an exact date, I’m hard pressed to tell you anything. I want to say most Skip Frye fish I see have wooden Gephart keels, but this example has fiberglass ones. Here’s what the seller has to say about the fins: “This board has great fins a modified Keel fin template by JB that is less deep then (sic) a normal keel and rides more loose in the water.” I don’t know who JB is, but I dig the vintage-ish date of the board. It’s 6’6″ long and looks super fun, and the posting has some great pics of the owner surfing it, too. Seller is asking $2,500, which is not cheap, but I have yet to see a bargain on a Skip Frye shape.

90s Hobie Phil Edwards Longboard (Craigslist Orange County)

You can click on any of the photos above to enlarge. I have written up the Hobie Phil Edwards Model a few times, and it remains one of the most classic nose riders ever made. The board you see above was shaped by Phil Edwards, but it’s not a Hobie Phil Edwards Model. For starters, the seller claims the board was shaped in 1995. It also has some interesting details that make it very different from the classic 60s Hobie Phil Edwards Model, such as a triple stringer setup, a wider center stringer, and a different logo. At some point during the 80s or 90s, Hobie also reissued the Phil Edwards Model (with the help of Stewart Surfboards, I believe), that had an imitation foil logo on it, as well as a different outline from the board you see above. So then what exactly is the board above? I’m not sure — it may have even been a custom. The seller refers to it as a Classic Model, but I have never seen that mentioned anywhere. As always, if you have any clues, let me know!

Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker (Craigslist Los Angeles)

Last but not least we have another creation from the mind of Tom Morey, who remains one of surfing’s foremost mad scientists. One of the coolest features found in the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker model is the psychedelic graphic design of the Slipcheck patterns. The McTavish Tracker was designed by Australian shaper Bob McTavish, and it remains one of the standout shapes of the Transition Era. According to surfresearch.com.au, the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker was created during a trip McTavish took to visit George Greenough in Santa Barbara, and the rest is history. I actually wrote up an earlier Morey Pope McTavish Tracker here. The earlier post features another example of the board and links to some resources with some history behind the groundbreaking shape.

Cruisin’: Nat Young for Rip Curl

Greetings, Shredderz! Apologies for the relatively sparse posting schedule this week. That said, they say it’s all about quality, and not quantity, and I can’t think of many things better than this 1981 Rip Curl ad featuring the great Nat Young. I absolutely love the surfboard Nat’s got tucked under his arm. If you look closely you can see the clean and simple “Nat Young Surf Design” text in black.

Nat Young Surfboards
An enviable lineup of Nat Young Surfboards 70s single fins. Photo is via the Vintage Surfboard Collectors group on Facebook

I don’t really see a ton of Nat Young Surf Design boards. I imagine that’s due to the fact I live in California. The photo above is courtesy of the Vintage Surfboard Collectors group on Facebook, which I would say leans towards Aussie shapers and labels.

If you’re a longtime reader of this blog, it shouldn’t surprise you that the great surfresearch.com.au has extensive information on the Nat Young Surf Design label. Check out the entry on Nat Young here, which also has links at the bottom for a variety of different Nat Young shapes. I’ve written before about the fascinating intersection of Australian and Hawaiian surfboard design influences, such as this Terry Fitzgerald Lightning Bolt shape, and it remains one of my favorite topics in surf history. According to Surf Research’s wonderful site, Nat Young drew inspiration from Hawaiians like Harold “Iggy” Ige and Joey Cabell for his equipment, especially during the Transition Era. I wish the Rip Curl ad at the top of the page showed more of the board itself, but alas, we only get a glimpse of the outline.

The Nat Young Rip Curl ad you see here originally ran in in the July 1981 issue of Surfer Magazine (Vol 22, No 7). I’m guessing the photo was likely taken sometime in 1980. Surf Research details a couple of 1981 Nat Young Surf Design sticks with early thruster setups. Given all these timelines, I wonder if the Nat Young Surf Design board in the Rip Curl ad was shaped towards the end of Young’s single fin phase, right as the rest of the surf world began to embrace Simon Anderson’s thruster invention.

Thanks for checking out the blog and check in next Thursday evening for more vintage surf ads, as part of Sagas of Shred!

 

 

 

Weekend Grab Bag: Tri Plane Hull Twin Fin & More

Greetings, Shredderz! The weekend is almost over, and right before the buzzer we’ve got another installment of the Weekend Grab Bag. Keep reading for a selection of cool vintage surfboards that are listed for sale online.

Channel Islands Al Merrick Tri Plane Hull Twin Fin (eBay)

I absolutely love vintage Channel Islands surfboards. Considering it’s probably the most famous modern surfboard label of all time, I’d expect to see more vintage CI sticks pop up. As you can see the board was shaped by Al Merrick himself — see here for an earlier blog post I wrote on the subject of Merrick hand shapes. The CI Tri Plane Hull twin fin measures in at 5’10” x 20 1/2″ x 2 5/8″. I think the board is way overpriced considering the condition — click through to the link to see close ups of the damage — but it’s still a cool stick.

Donald Takayama Flo Egg Thruster (Craigslist San Diego)

I’m tempted to snap up this one myself! Here’s a lovely 7’2″ Donald Takayama Flo Egg with a thruster setup. I can see this board being a versatile and fun every day rider. The seller is asking $700 for the board. You can clearly see that Takayama signed the board in pencil on the stringer. The newer Takayama boards that are produced nowadays have an image of Donald’s signature, indicating that this one was shaped by the man himself, though it’s unclear to me whether or not he used shaping machines for his later boards. Either way, for $700 I think this is very nicely priced.

Local Motion Pat Rawson Thruster with Pottz Airbrush (eBay)

I absolutely love this board, which was shaped by Hawaiian master Pat Rawson for the Local Motion label. The airbrush on the vintage surfboard you see above is an unmistakable tribute to Martin Potter’s iconic artwork. Sadly, as much as I love the board — and the colors and Rawson’s pedigree are unimpeachable — it’s priced in the stratosphere. I love the different colored glass on fins, too.

Thanks for checking out the Weekend Grab Bag and tune in for some more goodies later this week!

Vintage 70s Con Surfboards Ad: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! I’m afraid that our technical difficulties are ongoing, and so today I don’t have another freshly scanned vintage surf ad for you. Instead, this wonderful Con Surfboards ad was originally spotted on eBay, and I’m sharing it with you here. I’m unfamiliar with Larry Sheflo and Mike Marsh, the two team riders featured in the ad. Generally speaking, I’m a bit hazy on Con Surfboards’ history during the Seventies. I trend to think of Con Surfboards and their Sixties longboards, and even some of the Transition Era models they produced, but the label still manufactured boards in the Seventies. Con Surfboards also seems to have been around during the dawn of the Dogtown and Z Boys era, although I haven’t read anything truly informative on the subject. There’s an old photo I can’t find of I believe Tony Alva and Jay Adams skating with some Con Surfboards single fins under their arms. Saturdays has an excellent feature on Susea McGearheart, who captured some incredible photographs of the surf scene around Pacific Ocean Pier during the Seventies. The Saturdays feature has a pic of the Con Surfboards shop, which I’m assuming was another hangout for surfers in the Santa Monica / Venice area of Los Angeles.

As always, if you have more info on the topic of Con Surfboards in the Seventies, hit me up! I would love to hear more.

Vintage HIC Twin Fin by Cino Magallanes

Greetings, Shredderz! This evening we’ve got a very quick hit for you, and that’s a vintage HIC twin fin that’s currently for sale on eBay. You can find a link to the original listing here. All photos of the board in this post are via the eBay listing.

The vintage HIC twin fin featured here was shaped by Cino Magallanes. I’m most familiar with Cino from his time at T&C Surf, although it appears that he shaped a number of boards for Hawaiian Island Creations. Surfboard Hoard has a bunch of cool Cino Magallanes surfboards, and I even wrote up one of his HIC single fins during the very early days of the blog. The vintage HIC twin fin measures in at 5’9″ x 20 1/4″ x 2 3/4″, and it is located in Huntington Beach.

I really dig the details on this Hawaiian Island Creations surfboard. First of all, I love the old school HIC logos. It’s interesting to note that the logo on the deck has a silhouette of a surfer coming out of the volcano, whereas the logo on the bottom does not. I love the glass on fins and the old school HIC script running down the rails.

According to the seller, the board features an airbrush by none other than Jeannie Chesser. One of the main storylines in “Momentum Generation”, the newly released HBO documentary, is Todd Chesser’s lasting influence on Kelly Slater and his peers, including the devastating effects of his death. From the looks of it, Jeannie continues to airbrush surfboards today.

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Rell and me, Makaha..Todd's board

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Finally, check out the HIC ad below, featuring a young Cino alongside Chuck Andrus. Not sure who the surfer in the middle is — if you have any clues drop me a line.

Weekend Grab Bag: Airbrush Aficionado Edition, featuring 80s Stussy Surfboard and More

Well, Shredderz, if I’m going to waste a good chunk of my waking hours trawling Craigslist and eBay, I figure someone should benefit from all the time I’ve spent combing through listings. For today’s installment of the Weekend Grab Bag I’ve highlighted a few boards that all feature some pretty futuristic graphics, courtesy of some talented artists and craftsmen. As always, the Weekend Grab Bag features boards that are still for sale as of the time the blog post goes live. Anyway, keep scrolling to see a selection of special sleds that are currently for sale…

Stussy 80s Surfboard (Craigslist San Diego)

If there’s a cool 80s Stussy surfboard for sale, well, you know that I’m probably gonna write about it. Sadly this board has seen some better days, but the awesome airbrush is still largely intact. I think this board has an incredible paint job, even by the high standards of Stussy’s boundary pushing artwork in the Eighties. As an added little bonus, this 80s Stussy surfboard has a small planer logo, which is one of my favorite Stussy mini laminates. See below for an example of the planer logo that the S Double honcho shared on his Instagram:

M.T.B. Channel Twin Fin (eBay)

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We’ve got some more airbrush heat coming straight at you, this time courtesy of M.T.B. Surfboards. M.T.B. stands for Mulhern, Takayama and Brumett. Most of the M.T.B. Surfboards I see are located in Florida, which is where I think Mulhern was based. I personally haven’t seen very many Donald Takayama-shaped M.T.B. Surfboards, but I don’t know why that’s the case. Much like the 80s Stussy surfboard above, the bottom of the M.T.B. board doesn’t look great. As of the time of this post, the bidding was still under $200.

Mike Eaton Surfboards Single Fin (Craigslist SF Bay Area)

First of all, I love Mike Eaton’s surfboards, from his Bonzers to just about everything else he’s done. Second, Eaton’s surfboards commonly feature airbrushes by a particular artist, or at least very much influenced by that person’s style. I have never found any information online about who airbrushes Eaton’s boards, but I really dig them. See below for an example of a Bing board with a very similar airbrush, which I imagine was likely shaped by Eaton as well. I think the Mike Eaton surfboard is a little pricey at $800, but it is absolutely gorgeous.

Vintage Gordon & Smith Surfboards Ad: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Usually for Sagas of Shred I like to dip into my stash of Surfer Magazine back issues and scan something. Sadly, technical difficulties prevented me from doing so this week. In the meantime, enjoy this vintage Gordon & Smith ad, which I originally found on eBay a while back. I’d guess this ad was from sometime in the late Sixties, given the clear Transition Era shapes. From top to bottom: a Skip Frye “fast shape” (which I have also seen referred to as a “speed board” and a “baby gun” in other ads); a G&S Hot Curl, available in either a round tail or pin tail design; and a Midget Farrelly “contest design.” It’s also interesting to note the ad features a bit of copy for “variable Wave Set” fins available on the boards.

Stop by next week for more Sagas of Shred!

Brewer Hawk Surfboards: Sam Hawk Single Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a board that I wrote about earlier on Instagram, but I figured was worth a closer look. There are few shapers who can claim to have influenced modern surfboard design as much as Dick Brewer. During the Seventies, Dick Brewer had a number of proteges and collaborators, including Owl Chapman and Sam Hawk. (This post has a cool example of a Brewer / Hawk / Chapman board that was shaped under the Australian Hot Buttered label.) Sam Hawk initially shaped surfboards under the Dick Brewer label, but eventually began to branch out on his own. Somewhere between Dick Brewer and Hawk’s eponymous label, Sam Hawk crafted boards under the Brewer Hawk Surfboards name. During this stint he adopted Brewer’s famous plumeria flower wreath logo. It’s interesting to contrast Brewer Hawk Surfboards with Brewer Chapman Surfboards (the latter representing, of course, Owl Chapman’s foray into shaping for himself), which are practically mirror images of one another.

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From left to right: Sam Hawk, Owl Chapman, and Dick Brewer. Date and photographer are unknown

Anyway, this is all a very roundabout way of saying you don’t see too many Brewer Hawk Surfboards around. Owl continues to shape under the Brewer Chapman Surfboards brand, however. The board you see below is a Sam Hawk Seventies single fin that recently popped up for sale on Craigslist in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Brewer Hawk Surfboards Sam Hawk Single FinBrewer Hawk Surfboards Sam Hawk Single Fin BottomBrewer Hawk Surfboards Sam Hawk Single Fin Tail

I’m not sure when the board was shaped, but I’m guessing somewhere in the 1973 to 1976 range. I could be completely off, however. The Brewer Hawk Surfboards example here is a classic Seventies single fin in a lot of ways, from the glassed on fin to the wings in the tail. The Sam Hawk surfboard is approximately 7’3″ x 19 1/2″. All the photos of the board are via Craigslist; the listing has since been taken down.

The Brewer Hawk Surfboards sled pictured above is simply gorgeous. I love all the different colors going on, from the simple red deck to the contrasting cream bottom, and the multiple colors on the fin. If you look closely you’ll notice some nice detailed pin line work as well: there is a double pin line on the deck (contrasting white and blue), and then a red pin line on the bottom. While there’s a bit of an ugly ding on the back, a more knowledgeable friend speculated that the color matching for the repair wouldn’t be so tough, given the neutral color on the bottom.

Either way it’s a beautiful board, and part of me is very much wishing I had tried to snag the Brewer Hawk Surfboards stick. Now all I can say is I hope it has gone to a happy home. Finally, for a bonus, see below for a different Sam Hawk single fin.

Social Media Roundup: Tom Curren Skip Frye Fish and More

Greetings, Shredderz! If you don’t already follow me on Instagram, I humbly ask you to check out my IG page, where I post a vintage surfboard daily. More to the point, here are some of my favorite Instagram posts from recent history:

Here’s a great post that shows some detailed pics of the famous Skip Frye fish that was surfed by both Tom Curren and Derek Hynd. Curiously enough, I can’t find a ton of definitive info on the board, which you would think would be pretty easy, considering it had two well-known owners and was featured in Andrew Kidman’s “Litmus.” The Frye fish is also not to be confused with the Tommy Peterson “Fireball Fish” that Curren famously rode in maxing Indo in the mid-Nineties. (There’s a long thread on the Surfer Forum that contains some additional context.) Finally, Kidman’s site has a pic that indicates there were two Skip Frye fish shaped for Curren and/or Hynd. Long story short, I might not have the entire story straight yet, but you can’t go wrong with a pic of Tom Curren holding a Skip Frye fish! Photo at the top of the page by Ted Grambeau and originally featured in Surfer Magazine.

Sometimes I can’t shake the feeling that Tom Morey, despite his status as one of surfing’s all-time innovators, is still underrated. That board looks insane even from a cursory glance, and when you realize it was made in 1969 that’s when the alarm bells start going off. It’s a gorgeous photgraph, too.

And while we’re on the subject of fishes, here’s a stunning board posted by Orange County surfer, artist and shaper Tyler Warren. I love the Yater-style logo, and the red color is just too clean and classy. If you dig into the comments there’s a bit of lively debate about the board’s origins, and it seems like the board could have been shaped by Rich Pavel, not Steve Lis. Regardless of the back story, I’d love to have that sled in my quiver.

View this post on Instagram

And then there were two. Lucky enough to score another Rainbow Hynson this week. The one with the opaque deck shaped in 1970, spray by Ogden and pin line by @tapedoff . Board #100 The other is also a 1970 Rainbow Hynson airbrush John Bredin board #126. Reached out to John Bredin and this is what he said about the board: Ahh, thanks Luke, yes that’s definitely one that Hynson and (Steve Moray possibly) shaped, I sprayed and Peter Pinline did the ink work on for Rainbow. The 7 chakras leading to expanded consciousness. Looks like it had the nose weight slot? Take a shot of it straight on for me if you can. Looks pretty faded which is unusual, they seemed to hold up pretty well. Have you shown it to John Frazier? He’s got several of the old ones too. Currently owns Rainbow label. I love getting the credits from Sam Cody and Peter St. Pierre when people ask about the old days. It all started in the Surfboards Hawaii factory. Takayama is still using the logo I did for Donald back in that factory. There were some really nice Casters done after the Rainbow era. I did some for Chris O’Rourk. There were some private ones that Hynson shaped and I sprayed for locals we knew that we ran through the Bahne shop that had no logos on them. A couple for a guy named Hopper with the infamous “black dot” crew’s logo. One of those found its way through Steve Clark to the surfboard history museum in Oceanside. Steve had to explain to them that the black dot WAS the logo. I tried to get into selling my work to the photoprint process but didn’t have much luck at it. I’ll attach one I did for that. Also check my site for more recent commercial work and fine art painting. I collected a few images of Rainbows I did when I came out there for the California Gold Surf Auction and they auctioned off one of Johnny Gail’s personal boards that had that sort of pinlining on it. #vintagesurfboard

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Finally, we have a pair of Mike Hynson Rainbow Surfboards sticks with some truly next level airbrushes. As far as psychedelic artwork goes, I’d have to say that Rainbow Surfboards probably takes the cake. The caption contains some nice history on the Rainbow label, too.