Vintage Bonzer Surfboards at Wi-5 Premier

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post is a bit bittersweet. On one hand, we have the premier of “Wi-5”, a short film collaboration between Taylor Knox and the Campbell Brothers, who famously invented the Bonzer surfboard design. The premier brought out some of surfing’s biggest stars, and it was also an impromptu exhibit for some wonderful examples of vintage Bonzer surfboards. On the other, the film’s premier doubled as a charity benefit for Leeanne Ericson, who was attacked by a shark while swimming off San Onofre. Ms. Ericson faces some pretty hefty medical bills as a result. I urge you to check out her GoFundMe campaign here. Shout out to Taylor Knox, Mick Fanning, and everyone else who helped raise money for the good cause!

The Hi-5 premier was chock full of acts of charity AND some rad vintage Bonzer surfboards. See above for an Instagram post from Buggs of Surfboard Line fame. You’ll see some incredible vintage Bonzers flanking Duncan Campbell in the center. I took the descriptions from an Instagram Live broadcast that Buggs streamed during the event, where he got Duncan Campbell to provide some details about the boards.

The yellow board on the far left was shaped in 1973 / 1974 and was designed for the Hawaiian winter, hence the Lightning Bolt laminate. However, I don’t think it’s an “official” Bolt in any way. There’s also a Bing logo affixed to the yellow board. The orange board, second from left, was shaped in 1975 / 1976 and it was made in the Campbell brothers’ stomping grounds of Oxnard, California. The center board was one of the two main Bonzers ridden by Taylor Knox in the film.

The multi-colored board located third from right was shaped in 1977, and apparently it is one of only two similar Bonzers that were made. The multi-colored board is particularly interesting because of its Australian influence. In the video, which is no longer viewable, Duncan Campbell shows off the channel bottom of the multi-colored Bonzer and mentions that it was informed by the designs of Col Smith and Jim Pollard, who were shaping for Shane sub-label Fluid Foils at the time. Pollard in particular is known for being an early proponent of channel bottom boards. Andrew Kidman has a great interview with Al Byrne detailing Pollard’s early contributions to the design.

Col Smith Hawaii Boards 1977 via CrowsGarage.com
Col Smith showing off one of his Jim Pollard-shaped Fluid Foils. The photo was taken shortly before Smith left for Hawaii in 1977, where he turned heads with his surfing. Pic via the excellent entry on Crow’s Garage, which is a must-read!
Shane Surfboards Fluid Foils from BoardCollector.com.jpg
Fluid Foils logo detailing Jim Pollard and Col Smith (look at the bottom right). You can also see the logo on Col Smith’s board at the far left in the photo above. Photo via Boardcollector.com

I wish I had more pictures of the multi-colored Bonzer to share; sadly, the only ones I can find are also from the event. Still, in the photo below, you can see some more of the deep channels on the board. You’ll notice the channels on the multi-colored Bonzer travel up most of the length of the board, very similar to the board Col Smith is holding in the photo above. My guess is that the multi-colored board was shaped in 1977, shortly after a Hawaiian encounter between the Campbell brothers and Col Smith.

The black twin fin shown second from right is another rare Bonzer, given that it has a comparatively pedestrian fin setup. The board was shaped in 1978, according to Buggs’ video. It is the only example of a twin fin Bonzer I have ever seen.

The final board, pictured on the far right in both Instagram posts, is also a trip. It is a collaboration between Hawaiian surfboard label Local Motion and the Campbell Brothers. I believe this board belongs to Buggs now. Once upon a time it was ridden by Hawaiian fixture Tony Moniz, whose children are now well-regarded pros in their own right.

I was able to find earlier pictures of the Local Motion Bonzer on an old site belonging to Kristopher Tom, who currently runs The Vintage Surfboard. You can find the original pictures here.

Last but not least, you can contribute to Leeanne Ericson’s medical fund here.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail Personal Rider

First, if you haven’t seen the previous posts on Rick Surfboards and you’re interested in learning more about the brand, I recommend checking them out. Here are links for Part I and Part II.

Pictured above is a super rare Barry Kanaiaupuni personal rider with the Rick Surfboards logo. The pictures come courtesy of Randy Rarick / Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction. The Rick BK personal rider above was sold at the 2011 Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction. Prior to that, it was on display at the Hard Rock Cafe in Honolulu for a number of years (anyone know how I can hire that interior decorator?) Many thanks to Mr. Rarick for providing the pictures and the background on the board!

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Personal Rider Randy Rarick Logo.png
Rare version of the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Hawaii logo. I have never seen this logo before — either the cupped hands design or the Hawaii designation. Picture via Randy Rarick / Hawiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction

One of the coolest things about the BK rider — you know, besides the fact that it was ridden by BK himself! — is the logo. It is the only board I have ever seen with this Rick Surfboards Hawaii variant logo. According to Rarick, during the time when Rick Surfboards was producing its BK Pintail models, the brand opened up a store in Honolulu on Kapiolani Boulevard. Kanaiaupuni shaped some custom boards with Rick logos from their Honolulu store. My guess is the pink board pictured above was likely either shaped or sold at the Rick Surfboards Honolulu shop, hence the Hawaii logo. I’m not sure of the significance of the hands above the logo, but I am sure that it looks really, really cool.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Personal Rider Randy Rarick 3
Close up of the glass-on fin. Pic via Randy Rarick / Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction

I’m not sure when the Rick BK personal rider was shaped, but the board does have a distinct outline similar to other Transition Era boards. I imagine this board was put through its paces at Sunset!

For more on the Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction, visit the website here. Thanks again to Randy Rarick for the pictures and information in this post.

Shred Sledz Presents: September 15 Grab Bag (Hawaii Edition)

Greetings, Shredderz! Welcome to the latest edition of the Grab Bag, where I’ll be featuring some of the more notable boards I have seen listed for sale over the past few weeks. Today’s entry has a distinct Hawaiian flavor , as all of the boards covered below are from famous labels that hail from the birthplace of surfing.

Lightning Bolt Rory Russell Twin Fin (eBay)

This thing is KILLER! First, it’s in excellent condition. Actually, let me back up: first and foremost, the board just looks awesome. Even if you didn’t know the first thing about Lightning Bolt or Rory Russell, this board makes you stop and look. Maybe that makes me shallow…or maybe I just have impeccable taste when it comes to vintage surf craft. I’m always a sucker for intricate details, and I love the Clark Foam and Rory Russell Model laminates on the tail. The board is 5’4″. Is this considered a fish? I never see the Rory Russell twin fins referred to as such, but they seem pretty fish-like to me. Bidding is already hovering near $700 with four more days to go. Pics above via the eBay listing.

Surfboards Hawaii Owl Chapman Gun (Craigslist)

I love the old school Surfboards Hawaii logo, which is one of my favorite surfboard labels ever. Apparently this board was shaped by none other than Owl Chapman, uncle to current North Shore pro Kalani Chapman, and all-round Oahu fixture. I asked the seller if there’s a signature anywhere on the board, but I haven’t heard back. I’m not sure when this board was made, but I am guessing very early 1970s, based on the shape of the pintail, what looks like an after-market leash plug, and the glass-on fin. I have never seen a straight up Surfboards Hawaii Owl Chapman surfboard before. The pairing makes sense, given Chapman’s association with Dick Brewer, and the fact Brewer founded Surfboards Hawaii in 1961. The board is 9′, the board is located in Los Angeles, California, and the seller is asking $900.

Dick Brewer Gun and 1970s Single Fin (Craigslist & eBay)

There are currently two great Dick Brewer boards for sale. The first, pictured above, is a 8′ x 19-1/2″ x 3″ gun with glass-on fins in a thruster setup that should be ideal for the upcoming winter. It is being sold in Orange County, California. You can find a link to the board here. The seller is asking $600. I think that price is extremely reasonable, given that the board looks to be in excellent condition.

You want a Dick Brewer signature? Great, then how about another one? It’s a little odd that Brewer signed the board twice, but either way, I feel confident in saying the board was shaped by Brewer himself.

There’s a 1970s Dick Brewer single fin available on eBay that also bears two Dick Brewer signatures. Pic above is via the listing, which you can find here. The seller is asking $1500 for the board. The 1970s single fin has a wonderful old school outline and glassed on fin. Unfortunately, the pics provided with the eBay listing are pretty poor, so I have omitted them from the post. Still, I encourage you to click through and check them out for yourself.

As for the price difference, the best I can offer is that Brewer prices can be all over the place. I think one should expect genuine 1970s Dick Brewer single fins to command higher prices than newer boards. The gun on Craigslist is clearly newer (I would guess mid-1990s or later) and in better condition, but I imagoine 1970s single fins have more cachet.

Lightning Bolt 1970s Single Fin by Darrell Beckmeier (Craigslist)

Darrell Beckmeier was a fixture at Lightning Bolt during the 1970s. There’s a beautiful example of one of his boards that currently listed for sale on Craigslist in Orange County. Pics above are via the listing. The board is 6’6″ x 19-1/2″ (no dimension listed for thickness). The seller is asking $750. I’m honestly not sure what to make of this price, and how Beckmeier’s boards compare in value to other Bolt shapers. Still, it doesn’t get any more classic than single-fin Bolts!

Clark Foam Ad from the 1960s: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Welcome to yet another installment of Sagas of Shred. Every Thursday we feature a different slice of surf history, and today’s entry sheds a light on one of the most accomplished businessmen the surf industry has ever seen: Gordon “Grubby” Clark, the founder and CEO of Clark Foam.

Clark Foam Promotional Photo Gordon "Grubby" Clark.jpg
Gordon “Grubby” Clark in an early Clark Foam promotional photo. Pic via Charlie Bunger’s Long Island Surfing Museum

Before its abrupt closing in 2005, Clark Foam was one of the most fearsome forces in the surfboard industry. There are endless stories about Clark’s ruthlessness. The Surfboard Project has an anecdote, via Joel Tudor, about how Donald Takayama’s first label went under after Clark Foam denied him blanks. Surfer Magazine recently ran a retrospective on the Clark Foam closing, which includes similar tales of strong-arm tactics.

In the early 1960s, though, Clark had yet to establish its dominance, and this ad, at least, makes an earnest appeal to quality and performance instead. I love the fact that just about every single big name surfboard brand at the time has their logos present: Yater, Bing, Ole, Hobie, Wardy, Hansen, and Con. Of that list, only Wardy no longer continues to produce boards (although Con is a completely different company, and Bing Copeland has ceded control to well-regarded shaper Matt Calvani.)

For a great article on the early years of Clark Foam, and how Grubby and Hobie Alter helped lay the groundwork for the modern surfboard industry, I recommend the “727 Laguna Canyon Road” feature in The Surfer’s Journal.

Hope you enjoyed this entry in Sagas of Shred, and tune in next Thursday for what comes next!

Christian Fletcher Surfboards Price Check

A quick overview of some recent sales of Christian Fletcher Surfboards

Greetings, Shredderz! A few Christian Fletcher Surfboards were listed for sale on eBay recently, which can only mean one thing: time for another Shred Sledz post!

The first board, which can be seen directly above, mysteriously had the auction pulled. This means there’s no price data to be shared. You can see the board has classic Town & Country Surfboards laminates, but it was actually shaped by Steve Boysen. To be honest, I never understood why T&C sponsored Fletcher, only to let him simultaneously advertise Christian Fletcher Surfboards in addition to non-T&C shapers, like Boysen and Nev Hyman. Regarding the board above, it’s not in great condition, but it’s far from beat up, either. It’s a shame the original owner went with Gorilla Grip instead of Astrodeck!

The second example of a Christian Fletcher Surfboards model is still for sale on eBay. Pics above are via the listing, which you can find here. This board actually sold on eBay about a week ago. The original listing can be found here. The closing price the first time around was $650, including free shipping. My guess is the original buyer backed out, as the re-listed board has the same seller. The current price is $425, with a little over a day left in the auction. I have omitted the pictures that show where repairs have been made. In addition, there’s a considerable amount of fading on the logo on the bottom of the board. The fact a board in this kind of condition can still command $650 on eBay speaks to the collectibility of Christian Fletcher Surfboards. The board above does not have a T&C logo, and I imagine collectors prefer the classic T&C laminates of the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Christian Fletcher Alt Logo.jpg

The third and final board is a departure in the sense that it has what I believe is a more recent Christian Fletcher logo. Pic above via the listing, which you can find here. Why did they get rid of the original logo?! I hate to be the grouchy old guy reminiscing about the good old days, but to me it’s clear that the updated version is vastly inferior to the neon chaos of the classic Christian Fletcher design. Anyway, this seems to be reflected in the price: the board pictured above sold for $371 (however, it’s worth noting that shipping was $200 for the board.)

Photo credit at top of the page: photographer unknown, pic via RVCA

Rick Surfboards Part II: Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail (A Shred Sledz Deep Dive)

An in-depth overview of the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model surfboard produced during the Transition Era of the late 1960s

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post is Part II of our exploration of one of surfing’s most influential but still somehow underground surfboard labels: Rick Surfboards. If you missed Part I, which covers Rick noseriders and pre-Transition Era models, please check it out here. The initial version of the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model, produced starting in 1966, was a noserider. Rick Surfboards BK Model longboards continue to command high prices; one recently sold at the California Gold vintage surf auction for $2,450.

In 1967, with the Transition Era underway, Rick Surfboards released a shorter surfboard made for the steep, challenging conditions of Hawaii’s North Shore, and, of course, its namesake’s radical surfing. The end result was the Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail model.

The canvas for Kanaiaupuni’s new equipment — I’ve seen his Transition Era boards referred to as both pocket rockets and mini-guns — was big wave spot Sunset Beach. Barry K’s exploits at Sunset resulted in some iconic surf photographs, including shots from famed photographers Art Brewer and Jeff Divine.

Barry Kanaiaupuni Sunset Beach Jeff Divine 1972.jpg
Barry Kanaiaupuni and one of his signature bottom turns. Sunset Beach, 1972. Photo by Jeff Divine.

Barry Kanaiaupuni’s Early Shaping Days

From what I can tell, the longboard version of the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model was produced only during 1966 and 1967. I believe sometime in 1967 Rick Surfboards began producing the Pintail version of the BK Model. Stoked-n-Board claims the BK Pintail was produced until 1982. I find this unlikely for two reasons. First, just about every BK Pintail I have seen has a distinct Transition Era outline, which would have been outdated for the 1970s, much less the early 1980s. Second, Barry Kanaiaupuni started shaping for other brands during the early 1970s.

The Encyclopedia of Surfing tells us Kanaiaupuni began his shaping career at Rick Surfboards, followed by stints at Country Surfboards, Surf Line Hawaii, and then Lightning Bolt. This sequence makes me think Rick Surfboards ceased production on the BK Pintail well before 1982. There are many examples of boards shaped by Kanaiaupuni for other brands well before 1982: Surfboard Hoard has a Chuck Dent brand shaped by BK dated to 1969; I have seen a BK Surf Line Hawaii board dated to 1971; and Surfing Cowboys has a Lightning Bolt BK board supposedly made in 1972. Based on this evidence, I believe the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model was produced from 1967 until the early 1970s, at the latest.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail: Gun

Pictured above is an unusual example of the Rick Surfboards BK Pintail. Although dimensions for the board are not listed on the post, you can see the board has a traditional big wave gun shape. Compare this to all the examples below, which are shorter and have fuller noses paired with long, drawn out pintails. Nor is the pintail gun above a noserider, a la the board featured in the first post. The logo is interesting, too. It is the only example I have seen that reads “Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail.” All the other versions in this post read either “Barry Kanaiaupuni Model” or “Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail.” The board has been fully restored by Randy Rarick. The restoration makes me think it’s possible the logo is not all-original. See below for a pic comparing the length of the board to a Hobie Dick Brewer Model. I couldn’t find dimensions for the gun, but it looks considerably longer than all the other BK Pintails featured in this post.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model: 7’1″, 1967, Serial No. 442 (Non-Pintail Logo)

Pictured above is another Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail oddity. Pics are via the USVSA. As you can see, the board is clearly a Pintail version of the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model. However, it does not have a Pintail logo. The Rick Surfboards laminate is in the original font, too. Note the board is numbered #442 on the stringer; more on this later.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail (Various)

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Logo Closeup.jpg
Close-up of the logo on board #368. Note the updated font on Rick Surfboards, and the slight name change for the board: what was the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model has been changed to the Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail. Pic via The Vintage Surf Auction

This section focuses on “standard” versions of the Rick Surfboards BK Pintail. I define these boards as follows: they possess a Transition Era outline, with a full nose and dramatic, pulled-in pintail; and the logos bear the updated Rick Surfboards font and the “Pintail” text (versus boards that simply read “Barry Kanaiaupuni Model”).

A number of the standard Rick BK Pintails have been sold at auction recently. The picture above is from a board that sold at the Vintage Surf Auction in 2015. The Rick BK Pintail above is dated to 1967, and it has the serial #368. No dimensions are listed for #368. One thing that throws me for a loop is the ordering of the serial numbers. #442, the board with the blue fin that appeared earlier in the post, does not have the updated font on the Rick Surfboards logo, nor does it have the Pintail text. The numbering indicates #442 was made after #368, but the logo suggests otherwise.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail via Surfboardline.jpg
BK Pintail AKA Buggs’ Board. This is an all-original example of a standard Rick BK Pintail. Pics via Surfboardline.com

Buggs, the proprietor of Surfboardline.com, has a number of awesome Rick BK Pintails, which he has featured on his website and Instagram. The board above appears on Surfboardline.com. No serial number is listed for what I’ll call “Buggs’ Board.” I think it’s very possible Buggs’ Board and #368 are one and the same, but I can’t be sure without seeing pictures of the fin on #368. Buggs’ Board is all-original and it measures in at 8′ x 22″ x 2-1/2″, compared to #442, which comes in at 7’1″.

Pictured above is a 1967 Rick BK Pintail with an era-appropriate acid splash paint job. The board was sold at a USVSA event close to ten years ago. Pics are via the auction listing, which you can find here. The Acid Splash board measures in at 7’10”. Other than the rad airbrush, it looks quite similar to the other Rick BK Pintails listed above, from the silhouette down to the W.A.V.E. Set fin box.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail with Glass-On Fin

The board above comes courtesy of French surfboard site Surf-Longboard.com, and it is currently being offered for sale at €1,000. You can find a link to the board here. The French Board measures in at 7’4″. It has a very similar outline and length to the other Rick BK Pintails posted above.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail Glass On Fin
Close up of the fin on the French Board. The fin looks different — it has more rake and is thinner towards the tip — than its counterparts on the Acid Splash Board and #442. You can also see a bit of color towards the base of the fin. Pic via Surf-Longboard.com

The thing that stands out about the French Board is its glass-on fin. This is the only example I have seen without a W.A.V.E. Set fin box. The French Board also has some nice pin lines, reminiscent to #442.

There are a few Instagram posts that show off the details of the tail on the French Board. I assume this is true of the other Rick BK Pintails as well, but it’s difficult to say without any close-up pics.

Whaaa.. #pintail #oldstuff #ricksurfboards #barrykanaiaupuni #surfboard #vintagesurfclub 🔻 🏄

A post shared by Marie Corrège Molo (@molo.oo) on

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail with Signature

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail Mini Gun.JPG
The only triple stringer version of the Rick BK Pintail I have seen to date. Also note the signature on the bottom right. I can’t say for sure that it’s legitimate, but it’s promising!

The yellow board shown above is the only Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model I have seen that looks like it was signed by BK himself. The board was previously posted for sale on SurfnHula.com. You can find the link here. I don’t know whether or not this is a genuine BK signature. I have seen a variety of boards signed by BK, and his signature seems to vary.

Like the gun at the top of the post, the Triple Stringer board has two additional stringers.  It’s interesting the note the Triple Stringer board has been labeled a “Pocket Rocket.” The Triple Stringer’s dimensions are 7’9″ x 20-1/2″, putting it line with the other standard Rick BK Pintails featured here.

 

Conclusion

There you have it — every single Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail I have ever laid eyes on. I’m still bursting with questions: did BK shape all of these, or did Rick Surfboards use a ghost shaper? (I’m leaning towards the latter). What were the exact years during which the Rick BK Pintails were produced? How to explain the varying lengths of the boards — were they offered in different pre-set sizes? And, perhaps most importantly, are these boards every bit as cool as they look? As always, if you have any additional information or pics about the wonderful Rick Barry Kanaiaupuni Model, please give me a shout!

Check out the earlier post in the Rick Surfboards Deep Dive series here. Coming soon is Part III, in which we will delve into the beautiful single fins Rick Surfboards produced during the 1970s.

Photo Credit at the top of the page: Barry Kanaiaupuni surfing Sunset Beach, 1969. Photo by the peerless Art Brewer.

 

 

 

Original Hobie Phil Edwards Model Surfboard

Greetings, Shredderz! Here at Shred Sledz HQ we like to think of ourselves as equal opportunity surfboard enthusiasts. Stoke levels remain high for all kinds of vintage surfboards, ranging from underground Santa Cruz shapers to household names like Gerry Lopez. Even so, it can be difficult to resist the urge to play favorites. Such is the case with the Hobie Phil Edwards Model surfboard, which holds a special place in the hearts of Shred Sledz staff. If you missed our earlier post covering the Hobie Phil Edwards model, I urge you to check it out here. It’s a detailed look at the various Hobie Phil Edward Model surfboards that have been sold at auction. As always, if there are any missing boards you know of, don’t hesitate to drop me a line!

Pictured above is a Hobie Phil Edwards Model Surfboard that is currently for sale on eBay. Pics are all via the eBay listing, which you can find here. The board is exciting for a number of reasons. First of all, it’s an example from the original run of the Hobie Phil Edwards boards, as evidenced by the foil logo and the serial number. This is the first time I have seen board #586 appear (my previous post covered boards with serial nos #999, #865, #103, and #479). The seller dates the board to 1963. You can see it has the classic triple stringer setup, with a 3/4″ central stringer made from redwood, and then two 1/4″ redwood stringers flanking it on either side. The dimensions of the board are 9’3″ x 20-7/8″ x 3″, which should be provide ample paddling power on top of all the necessary style points. It’s interesting to compare the lengths of the various boards: #103 is 9’9″; #865 is 10′; and #479 is also 10′. I was unable to find data on #999.

It’s unclear to me the extent to which the board has been restored. The listing mentions that #586 has been re-glossed by surfboard whisperer Randy Rarick, but I’m not sure if that amounts to a total restoration.

Hobie Phil Edwards Model Surfboard 5
Close up of the fin. The seller claims this is the original one that came with the board. If so, it’s remarkable that it has retained its color over the years! Pic via eBay

The fin stands out as well. The seller claims that this is the original “two-tone powder blue fin.” Board #999 has an identical fin, although it looks like the color has faded over time. It’s interesting to note that boards #103 and #479 have wooden fins. The auction listing for #103 describes it as a reverse mahogany fin. Board #865, meanwhile, has what looks like a fiberglass fin similar to #586, but it is a burgundy color. I’m not sure if there’s any discernible pattern for why a given Hobie Phil Edwards Model surfboard would come with one type of fin or another.

Hobie Phil Edwards Model Surfboard 9
Goodness gracious, this board has some beautiful lines. Pic via eBay

The starting bid for #586 is $2,400. All the historical data I have for other Phil Edwards sales involve all-original, unrestored boards: #103 apparently closed at $4,925; #865 is still on sale for $4,000; and #999 was estimated to sell for anywhere between $2,000 and $5,000.

If you’re interested in the board — it would make an ideal gift for your favorite vintage surfboards blogger — please check it out here.