Wave Tools Twin Fin by Lance Collins

Greetings, Shredderz! First things first, and that’s giving credit where credit is due. The photos in this blog post of the amazing 80s Wave Tools twin fin come courtesy of Shred Sledz reader Steve Wray. Steve has blessed us with some awesome pics from his equally great collection, and for that I am forever grateful. Longtime readers may know by now that I have a huge weakness for any and all things from the 80s. There are few brands who exemplify the neon Echo Beach aesthetic of the decade quite like Wave Tools, and this Lance Collins shaped twin fin ticks all of the boxes.

The gradient fade on the checkerboard pattern on the bottom is pure 80s excess — not to mention the four laminates that sit on top of it (as if there were ever any question about the label of the board!) Mr Wray tells me the board is an even 6’0″. I’m not sure what year it was shaped. My guess it was in the earlier part of the decade, before the thruster craze took over.

I also love the contrasting color schemes on the deck and the bottom of the board. There’s a great natural contrast between the cooler blue and green tones of the deck, and the symmetrical airbrush, and then the complete sunburst chaos found on the bottom. And, even after all this, if by some chance you’re still confused about who shaped the board, the huge Lance Collins laminates on either side of the nose (and the two decals on the rails) should settle any questions once and for all.

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It’s also cool to see that Lance Collins glassed the Wave Tools twin fin in question. There aren’t too many shapers that glass their own boards these days, and there’s something rad about a board that has been made from start to finish by one set of hands.

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RIP Clark Foam…the oversized Clark Foam laminate will always be awesome to me.

As you can see, the Wave Tools twin fin has taken on some discoloration. Nonetheless, I am stoked to see that the colors and laminates are still very well preserved. In my opinion, the most important elements of the board have been retained quite well, and I actually prefer it in its current state to a full on restoration that would involve stripping off the glass.

Thanks again Steve for sharing pics of the board!

Surfboards Hawaii V Bottom

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’re going to shine a spotlight on one of my all-time favorite Transition Era boards: the Surfboards Hawaii V Bottom, or, as it’s technically known, the Surfboards Hawaii V.

The Surfboards Hawaii V bottom you see above (click photos to enlarge) comes courtesy of Shred Sledz reader Bobby. Thanks for sharing the photos of your beautiful board! As you can see, Bobby’s Surfboards Hawaii V is in pretty great condition. The fin — I’ll be honest, I always mix up my Transition Era fins, and I always guess W.A.V.E. Set when it’s not, so I’ll just pass for now — in particular stands out, and you can see the dramatic vee in the tail. (Update: I just asked a far more knowledgeable friend, and he confirmed that the fin is an early Bahne / Fins Unlimited design.)

I’ve heard some people say that the Surfboards Hawaii V doesn’t surf all that well, but I’m not one to judge. Rather, I tend to appreciate the unusual lines and dimensions of the board. I always trip out whenever I see a close up shot of the tail of a Surfboards Hawaii V bottom, like in the photo below. I’m always struck by the sheer amount of foam packed in the back end of these boards. The Surfboards Hawaii V bottom is almost reminiscent of a Corvette with its bulky, high tail. In addition to the dramatic vee on the bottom, you can also see how the tail section on the deck has been carved out, too. I love the black pinline on Bobby’s board and how it accentuates the Hawaii V’s angular lines.

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There was another Surfboards Hawaii V bottom that was posted for sale on Craigslist earlier this month. I have reproduced some of those photos below, which give you a good idea of the rocker and outline of the board. You can click on the photos below to enlarge.

One thing I have never been able to track down is more information on who might have shaped the Surfboards Hawaii V bottoms. As many of us have been known to do, Bobby sought out the counsel of Bill Thrailkill on Swaylocks. According to Bobby, Thrailkill told him that there’s a good chance Ed Wright, who was on the Surfboards Hawaii label in the late Sixties, shaped a number of these boards. If anyone knows more, hit me up!

Last but not least, here’s a cool Surfboards Hawaii V bottom ad, courtesy of the @vintage_surf_ads account on Instagram. I love how the ad turns up its nose at the competing “mild V-bottoms on the market today”, and touts the fact that the Hawaii V is for “experienced surfers only.” It’s also interesting to read that these boards were apparently made with fiberglass stringers, too.

Thanks again to Bobby for sharing photos of his beautiful Surfboards Hawaii v bottom board, and I hope you enjoyed the post!

Natural Progression Single Fin by Robbie Dick

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ve got a real treat for you: that’s right, a Seventies Natural Progression single fin shaped by Robbie Dick. Natural Progression was a Los Angeles based label that enjoyed a brief but memorable time in the sun. This bad boy was lurking on Craigslist recently and a friend was lucky enough to snag it. Alright, that’s enough back story: onto the pics!

Natural Progression Single Fin Robbie Dick 4Natural Progression Single Fin Robbie Dick 3

As you can see, the board is in pretty good condition. There are some dings and scrapes that aren’t super easy to see from the photos. Overall, though, the board is in great shape. The Natural Progression single fin measures in at approximately 7′ x 19″. The wide point is pretty far forward, as is common with boards made during this time. Overall it has a clean and gorgeous outline that you would expect from a Seventies single fin.

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This post wouldn’t be complete without a mention of the awesome Natural Progression logo. Of all the defunct surfboard brands out there, this logo just might be best of the lot. (I’ve probably said that about some other surfboard label, too, so please forgive me if that’s the case.) Something about the logo — maybe the fact it’s colorful without being noisy — captures what I imagine California must have felt like in the freewheeling Seventies.

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The board has a gorgeous black and white glass on fin, too, which is always a welcome touch. Again, I’m a bit surprised at how the fin has remained in great shape over the years, as these often get dinged up or knocked loose. I’ve seen the board in person and I can only guess that it wasn’t surfed very frequently, and then stored well for a number of years.

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As you can see in the photo above, the signature has faded over time, but it’s still easy to make out some elements. The number, “77-193” (could be “77-793”, but I’m not sure), almost certainly signifies the fact the board was shaped in 1977. The number behind the dash is likely the sequential number for the number of boards shaped in that year. In fact, there’s actually another Natural Progression surfboard for sale on Craigslist right now, which you can find here. The numbering on the the board for sale reads “79-22”, which likely means it was the 22nd board shaped by Robbie Dick in 1979. You can also make out the “R. Dick” on the stringer above, meaning the board was shaped by Robbie Dick.

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There isn’t a ton of information on Natural Progression and/or Robbie Dick online, but I was able to find a couple of interesting scraps here and there. First, it looks like Dick has since relocated to the Pacific Northwest, where he continues to shape boards. You can check out his website here. Second, the excellent Los Angeles nostalgia-themed website Westside Historic has some great pics of some Natural Progression memorabilia, which I have reproduced above. Finally, the International Surfboard Builders Hall of Fame has a cool page on Robbie Dick, which is where I nabbed the photo of Dick in the shaping room (top left).

Vintage HIC Twin Fin by Cino Magallanes

Greetings, Shredderz! This evening we’ve got a very quick hit for you, and that’s a vintage HIC twin fin that’s currently for sale on eBay. You can find a link to the original listing here. All photos of the board in this post are via the eBay listing.

The vintage HIC twin fin featured here was shaped by Cino Magallanes. I’m most familiar with Cino from his time at T&C Surf, although it appears that he shaped a number of boards for Hawaiian Island Creations. Surfboard Hoard has a bunch of cool Cino Magallanes surfboards, and I even wrote up one of his HIC single fins during the very early days of the blog. The vintage HIC twin fin measures in at 5’9″ x 20 1/4″ x 2 3/4″, and it is located in Huntington Beach.

I really dig the details on this Hawaiian Island Creations surfboard. First of all, I love the old school HIC logos. It’s interesting to note that the logo on the deck has a silhouette of a surfer coming out of the volcano, whereas the logo on the bottom does not. I love the glass on fins and the old school HIC script running down the rails.

According to the seller, the board features an airbrush by none other than Jeannie Chesser. One of the main storylines in “Momentum Generation”, the newly released HBO documentary, is Todd Chesser’s lasting influence on Kelly Slater and his peers, including the devastating effects of his death. From the looks of it, Jeannie continues to airbrush surfboards today.

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Rell and me, Makaha..Todd's board

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Finally, check out the HIC ad below, featuring a young Cino alongside Chuck Andrus. Not sure who the surfer in the middle is — if you have any clues drop me a line.

Brewer Hawk Surfboards: Sam Hawk Single Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a board that I wrote about earlier on Instagram, but I figured was worth a closer look. There are few shapers who can claim to have influenced modern surfboard design as much as Dick Brewer. During the Seventies, Dick Brewer had a number of proteges and collaborators, including Owl Chapman and Sam Hawk. (This post has a cool example of a Brewer / Hawk / Chapman board that was shaped under the Australian Hot Buttered label.) Sam Hawk initially shaped surfboards under the Dick Brewer label, but eventually began to branch out on his own. Somewhere between Dick Brewer and Hawk’s eponymous label, Sam Hawk crafted boards under the Brewer Hawk Surfboards name. During this stint he adopted Brewer’s famous plumeria flower wreath logo. It’s interesting to contrast Brewer Hawk Surfboards with Brewer Chapman Surfboards (the latter representing, of course, Owl Chapman’s foray into shaping for himself), which are practically mirror images of one another.

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From left to right: Sam Hawk, Owl Chapman, and Dick Brewer. Date and photographer are unknown

Anyway, this is all a very roundabout way of saying you don’t see too many Brewer Hawk Surfboards around. Owl continues to shape under the Brewer Chapman Surfboards brand, however. The board you see below is a Sam Hawk Seventies single fin that recently popped up for sale on Craigslist in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Brewer Hawk Surfboards Sam Hawk Single FinBrewer Hawk Surfboards Sam Hawk Single Fin BottomBrewer Hawk Surfboards Sam Hawk Single Fin Tail

I’m not sure when the board was shaped, but I’m guessing somewhere in the 1973 to 1976 range. I could be completely off, however. The Brewer Hawk Surfboards example here is a classic Seventies single fin in a lot of ways, from the glassed on fin to the wings in the tail. The Sam Hawk surfboard is approximately 7’3″ x 19 1/2″. All the photos of the board are via Craigslist; the listing has since been taken down.

The Brewer Hawk Surfboards sled pictured above is simply gorgeous. I love all the different colors going on, from the simple red deck to the contrasting cream bottom, and the multiple colors on the fin. If you look closely you’ll notice some nice detailed pin line work as well: there is a double pin line on the deck (contrasting white and blue), and then a red pin line on the bottom. While there’s a bit of an ugly ding on the back, a more knowledgeable friend speculated that the color matching for the repair wouldn’t be so tough, given the neutral color on the bottom.

Either way it’s a beautiful board, and part of me is very much wishing I had tried to snag the Brewer Hawk Surfboards stick. Now all I can say is I hope it has gone to a happy home. Finally, for a bonus, see below for a different Sam Hawk single fin.

Sixties Jacobs Surfboards Step Deck

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a very brief entry focusing on a board that was listed for sale last week on Craigslist. Pictured here is a Jacobs Surfboards step deck longboard that was shaped in 1967, according to the listing. Sadly the listing is no longer live, but I managed to save the photos, which you can find here.

For today’s post I have more questions than answers. As always, if you have some insight to share, don’t hesitate to get in touch! The Jacobs Surfboards longboard you see here was described as potentially having been shaped by none other than Donald Takayama.

A few months ago I wrote up a Jacobs Donald Takayama Hawaii model, which you can find here. In addition, Jacobs Surfboards also produced a separate Donald Takayama Model. I have seen a few different variants of the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model. First, you can see an example here, apparently from 1965, with a triple stringer setup and a Donald Takayama Model laminate. Here’s another Jacobs Donald Takayama Model, but you can see there’s a double stringer setup, and the logo is slightly different. The double stringer board posted on Swaylocks was apparently shaped in 1967, but I’ve also read that Takayama left Jacobs for Bing in 1966.

As for the board featured here, I’m not quite sure what to say. It has the red fin and a clear step deck, but it has a relatively straightforward single stringer setup. More importantly, it doesn’t have any Donald Takayama laminates anywhere on the board. The seller estimated the board was shaped in 1967, which again would mean it was shaped after Takayama had already decamped for Bing. That said, I don’t have any confirmations on these dates other than the sources I have already linked to.

The Jacobs Surfboards step deck longboard you see here is a beautiful board, and it’s still in pretty good condition considering its age. I wish I had some more definitive info about whether or not it is at all related to Takayama, but in the meantime, I’ll just admire these photos of a very cool vintage surfboard.

 

 

George Greenough Design Edge Board Shaped by Bob Duncan

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ve got a real doozy for you. Featured here is an absolutely insane George Greenough Design edge board shaped by Bob Duncan of Wilderness Surfboards. All of the photos come courtesy of a fellow Shredder in New Jersey who would like to remain anonymous. He stumbled across this board while on an adventure in California, and was kind enough to share the photos you see here.

The George Greenough Design edge board featured here is actually a sail board. In the photo of the deck you can see a slot for a sail, as well as where the foot straps would have been placed. The George Greenough Design edge board was shaped by Bob Duncan in either the late Eighties or early Nineties. It was apparently made for large swells at Razor Blades, a spot within the famed Hollister Ranch.

The edge board comes from the fertile mind of George Greenough, the legendary and reclusive design genius who helped usher in the shortboard revolution, and is still influencing surfboard design today. Recently Greenough’s edge board has undergone a revival of sorts thanks to a lineup of well-regarded shapers, including folks like Marc Andreini, Kirk Putnam, Scott Anderson and Manny Caro. Andrew Kidman and Ellis Ericson recently released a film / book project called “On the Edge of a Dream”. Kidman and Ericson’s project documents their explorations of Greenough’s edge board design, which were produced in collaboration with Greenough himself.

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Ellis Ericson puts his own spin on George Greenough’s edge board design and makes it look good. Photo via Surfing World; photo by Woody Gooch

What makes the Bob Duncan / George Greenough Design sail board interesting is the fact it was shaped well before the current edge board craze. The best summary of the history of Greenough’s edge board can be found in Marc Andreini’s excellent book “The Gift.” The relevant chapter on the Greenough edge board was excerpted in Liquid Salt. Greenough invented the edge board in the Sixties, and by the Seventies, surfboard shapers had shifted their attention elsewhere. Greenough began windsurfing in the early Eighties, and during this process he rediscovered the benefits of the edge board design. One of Greenough’s famous sail boards was a 7’3″ shape he dubbed “The Backyard Special”, which was profiled in The Surfer’s Journal. The Backyard Special was an edge board that helped prove the benefits Greenough had initially envisioned about the design.

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George Greenough’s magic board, AKA The Backyard Special. This is a sail board that incorporates a number of Greenough design elements, from the spoon-like deck to an edge board on the bottom. It also includes a power blade fin, which is not pictured here. Photo via The Surfer’s Journal

The way Greenough tells it, the Backyard Special was a magic board. In 2014, when Greenough decided to shape some surfboards for Dave Rastovich following a multi-decade hiatus, he drew on the edge board concepts from the Backyard Special. The end result were two edge boards, one of which Rasta surfed at decent sized Cloudbreak.

Greenough Edge Board Dave Rastovich Cloudbreak Liquid Salt Nick Liotta
Dave Rastovich putting a 6’3″ George Greenough edge board through its paces at Cloudbreak. Greenough shaped two boards for Rasta’s trip to Fiji: the 6’3″ pictured here, and an 8’8″ that Rasta did not get to surf after injuring his knee. These two boards represented the first stand up surfboards Greenough had shaped in years. Photo via The Surfer’s Journal / Liquid Salt; photograph by Nick Liotta

Rasta’s Fiji trip was also chronicled in the Surfer’s Journal. You can find the original article here, which was originally published in 2014 (and if you don’t already subscribe, you really should.) Rastovich, in turn, mentioned the Greenough edge boards to Ellis Ericson during a trip to the Maldives. Ericson and Kidman then collaborated with Greenough to produce updated versions of some of his famous designs, and documented the entire process for “On the Edge of a Dream.”

Back in California, it appears that Bob Duncan had been shaping interpretations of the George Greenough Design edge board concept since the late eighties and early nineties, right when Greenough was pushing the limits on his Backyard Special. Perhaps Duncan was in touch with Greenough at this time, or word of Greenough’s edge board designs had gotten back to Duncan somehow. It’s not clear to me how Duncan initially picked up the edge board concept. That said, Wilderness Surfboards, the label under which Bob Duncan shapes, was actually founded by George Greenough and Michael Cundith. However, it appears Greenough hasn’t been involved with the label (either its Santa Barbara or New South Wales variants) for a while now.

In addition to the George Greenough Design sail board featured here, you can find plentiful evidence of other edge boards shaped by Bob Duncan. See below for a photo of an edge board gun with a thruster setup that was shaped in 1993.

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Photo of a Bob Duncan-shaped Wilderness Surfboards gun that incorporates Greenough’s edge board concept. I can’t be sure but the edge looks different than the more dramatic version on the board Rasta is surfing at Cloudbreak further up in the post. Photo via Swaylocks

Kirk Putnam also published a photo of a Bob Duncan edge board on his blog back in 2011, a few years before Greenough shaped his boards for Dave Rastovich. You can see the photo below:

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On the left is an old Wilderness Surfboards hull shaped by Richie West. On the right is a Bob Duncan / Wilderness Greenough edge board. You can also see what looks like a variant of Greenough’s power blade fin. Photo via KP’s Round Up

Finally, I couldn’t help but notice the logo on the Bob Duncan edge board. The deck has the classic George Greenough Design airplane logo. What’s interesting is the logo on the bottom of the board, which appears to be a variant of the airplane logo. I’m not sure the story behind this version of the George Greenough Design airplane logo, so if you have info, let me know.

Thanks again to the mystery Shredder in New Jersey who shared these photos of the Bob Duncan / George Greenough Design edge board. It’s a fascinating window into a design that has roots both in California and Australia, spanning across decades of surfing history, involving a number of talented surfers and craftsmen.

Stussy Surfboard: Eighties (?) Thruster

Greetings, Shredderz! Recently a cool little Stussy surfboard sold on eBay, and given my long standing interest in Senor Stussy’s boards, I figured I would do a quick writeup on the topic. The original eBay listing can be found here; pics in this post are via the listing.

The Stussy surfboard pictured above is a vintage thruster with a very cool airbrush. If I had to guess, I would say the board above was either shaped during the late Eighties, or perhaps even the early Nineties. There are a few things that stand out to me. First, you’ll notice the logos on both the deck and the bottom of the board. On the deck you’ll notice a crown logo with a Chanel-like double S beneath it. I believe the Stussy crown logo didn’t make its debut until the late Eighties or so. On the bottom of the board you’ll notice some Rasta themed logos, including a lion and the Rastafarian flag. The lion also appears on the glass on fins, which you can see below:

You can click the photos above to enlarge. Back to my earlier point, I believe the Rasta logos and influence didn’t show up on Stussy’s boards until the late Eighties or early Nineties.

Pictured above is an example of another Stussy surfboard with Rasta logos. I would say these boards were likely shaped within a few years of one another, although you’ll notice that the eBay board at the top of the page has a serial number of 1115, and then the Stussy surfboard “For Rocket” is #2837. I tend to think Stussy’s numbering is not totally sequential. In fact, I suspect #1115 was likely shaped after #2837, but I can’t confirm that.

Shawn Stussy Personal Rider Twinzer 1991

The one example of a Stussy surfboard I have seen with a definitive date is this super sick Wil Jobson inspired twinzer, which you can see above. The Stussy twinzer was sold at auction a few years back, and the photo is from the original auction site. Note the Jobson / Stussy surfboard has the same Rasta lion logo as the eBay board at the top of the page. It has a crown logo, too, although it’s a bit different than the one featured earlier in this post. Unlike the other boards in the post, the Jobson twinzer doesn’t have a serial number, but it appears to have been shaped in 1991.

The Stussy surfboard at the top of the page was listed on eBay with a price of $1,250. It looks like the board didn’t sell on eBay, but likely was sold in a private transaction off the site. There’s no way to tell the final price, and I’m curious to see if it reached the original asking, which I would put slightly on the steep side. Then again, the Stussy surfboard has a great original airbrush, which I think can improve the value of these boards considerably.

Donald Takayama Surfing’s New Image Surfboard for Dru Harrison

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’re taking a quick look at a board that recently caught my eye. Pictured here is a Surfing’s New Image surfboard shaped by Donald Takayama. The board was originally listed for sale on eBay, and all pics in this post are via the eBay listing. You can find the original listing here. I’ve long had a bit of a fascination with the SNI brand, whether it’s the Aipa stings that were produced under the label (although most SNI / Aipa stings were not shaped by Ben Aipa), or some of Rick Hamon’s later designs. If I had to choose, though, I’m probably most fond of the SNI boards that were shaped by Donald Takayama. Takayama, of course, was a surfing fixture for decades, whether it was as a Velzy / Jacobs team rider during the sport’s earliest days, or his collaborations with Joel Tudor starting in the Nineties. The Surfing’s New Image surfboard pictured here is an unusual one. First, I would say that you don’t see a ton of Takayama / SNI boards in general, but this one is the only example I have seen that has a Dru Harrison laminate on it.

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According the listing, the board measures in at 7’0″ x 19 1/2″ x 3″. The board was almost certainly shaped sometime during the Seventies, though I’m not sure what year. Dru Harrison’s best known surfboard is the Improvisor model he produced under the Rick Surfboards label during the Sixties. Here’s an example of a Rick Surfboards Dru Harrison Improvisor that recently sold on eBay as well.

The SNI board sold for about $150. Even though the board would require a decent amount of repairs, I still think this is a pretty good price. After all, this is a Donald Takayama we’re talking about! From what I have seen, the SNI / Takayama boards can be had at fairly decent prices. Here’s another example of a Seventies SNI / Takayama stick that sold for $575, which I thought was a nice price from the buyer’s perspective.

Sadly, I can’t find any information on Takayama and Harrison’s relationship. I’m guessing they must have crossed paths in the South Bay in the Sixties. During this time Harrison was riding for Rick Surfboards, and Takayama was designing boards for both Bing Surfboards and then Weber. Considering the high profile of both men involved in making this board, you’d think there would be a little more information available.

You can check out the original eBay listing for the Surfing’s New Image surfboard designed by Dru Harrison and Donald Takayama here.

 

Rick Rasmussen Surfboard

Greetings, Shredderz! In honor of fellow New York native Balaram Stack’s finals finish at the 2019 Volcom Pipe Pro, here’s a beautiful Rick Rasmussen surfboard that was recently sold on eBay. All pics in this post are via the eBay listing, which you can find here. Rasmussen is one of the more fascinating characters in surf history. For many years, Rasmussen stood alone as New York’s only real pro surfer of note, thanks to his competitive prowess in the early professional scene, as well as his tuberiding in places like Pipeline and G-Land. Sadly, Rasmussen’s story cannot be told without mention of his tragic death, which happened during a drug deal gone bad. The Encyclopedia of Surfing has reprinted an excellent article detailing Rasmussen’s passing, which gives some additional depth to an already compelling subject.

The board, despite not being in great condition, sold for a cool $1,725. The price, when considering the condition, gives you a good idea of how rare it is to find a Rick Rasmussen surfboard for sale. The board measures in at 8’2′ x 19 3/8″ x 2 3/4″ and according to the seller it was likely shaped in either 1972 or 1973. The listing claims the board was mostly surfed on the North Shore in the Seventies before being relocated to Southern California in 1980, and then it was stashed away in storage for many years. I think there’s a decent chance that Rasmussen rode this board at Pipeline, which makes it extra sick.

While this Rick Rasmussen surfboard is no longer listed for sale, I did some digging on Instagram and was able to find a couple of other cool examples of Rick Rasmussen surfboards. Turns out that Rasmussen actually shaped for an early label called Clean & Natural, and before that, a local Westhampton label called Lizard. I had never even heard of Lizard before, and that brand isn’t even mentioned in Rasmussen’s Encyclopedia of Surfing listing. Scroll below for a shot of a Rick Rasmussen surfboard shaped for the Lizard label, which is the only one I have seen to date.

 

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Luke Moore, from Westhampton but longtime resident of San Diego, shared this photo with me last night. Luke is on the left, age 14 and Rick Rasmussen is on the right, age 18. This is taken in 1974, the year Rick won the U.S. Championship. Rick shaped both boards. Luke currently shapes out in San Diego and still does boards for some of the older guys out east on LI. Luke was also a legendary skateboarder, draining pools in the hamptons in the fall during the 70s. I asked him how he got into skateboarding and he said, "I just learned, mostly from surfing. I mean, surfing taught me skateboarding." His style shocked and awed Jay Adams, Peralta and others, and was developed completely in the Eastern LI incubator at that time. Surfing, Luke charged Pipe like a lot of his peers from the Westhamptons, and with their own style. A Westhampton relationship with second reef Pipe is starting to become clear to me #LukeMoore #RickRasmussen #BrendanBurrMcGill etc please tag more

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