Vintage Ben Aipa Ad: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s Sagas of Shred entry is short but a worthy (I hope) follow on to most recent post, which featured an Aipa-branded but Rick Hamon-shaped sting. This ad comes from a 1981 issue of Surfer Magazine, after the 70s heyday of the Sting. Based on the copy I’m guessing it’s an ad for Aipa’s twin fin designs. The timing lines up, as the ad above ran at a time shortly before Simon Anderson’s thruster reached critical mass. The other interesting thing about the ad above is there is no mention whatsoever of Surfing’s New Image, which had licensed Aipa’s name for a run of California-made stings. Instead, the California distributor for Aipa’s shapes appears to be Infinity Surfboards.

I wish the photography in the ad were a little bit clearer, but oh well. It’s still pretty rad to me.

Thanks for reading and check in next week for more Sagas of Shred.

Aipa Surfing’s New Image Sting by Rick Hamon

Greetings, Shredderz! By now regular readers might know that I have a real affection for the sting, a surfboard outline created by Ben Aipa in the 1970s, and ridden to acclaim by Hawaiian surfers like Buttons Kaluhiokalani and Larry Bertlemann (and Mark Richards, too!) The board is frequently referred to as the stinger, but Aipa insists the proper name is the sting, and I am in no position whatsoever to argue with that! I wrote a previous post about how to identify genuine Ben Aipa shaped stings, given that many “Aipa” boards were produced by California-based Surfing’s New Image during the 1970s and 1980s. SNI boards are nothing to sneeze at though, as some of them were shaped by Donald Takayama. Rick Hamon, who would later become one of the top shapers at Rusty Surfboards, also churned out a number of Aipa / Surfing’s New Image stings.

Pictured above is a pretty flawless example of a Rick Hamon-shaped Aipa / SNI sting. These aren’t quite as collectible as real deal Aipas, but they are still amazing boards. The board pictured above happens to be listed for sale on Craigslist in San Diego, and you can find the listing here.

As you can see from the pictures, this thing is in extremely clean condition. The seller claims the board was shaped for him around 1975, which would put it around the height of the sting’s popularity. It has a beautiful rainbow airbrush on the deck, which you can clearly see in the pictures. The board measures in at 7’4″.

The seller is asking $600 for the board. While Aipa / SNI stings shaped by Hamon don’t command as high prices as Ben Aipa hand shapes, there seem to be a number of sting lovers. And even if the board isn’t shaped by Aipa, it still has his logo on it, which makes a difference. My two cents is this is a great price for the board considering the condition. Of course, standard caveats apply, as I haven’t seen the board in person for myself, but from what I can tell from the listing, this is a nice little pickup.

You can check out the Aipa Surfing’s New Image listing here.

Jacobs Single Fin by Redman

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post is a quickie, but that doesn’t make this board any less stunning. Pictured below is a stunning Seventies single fin shaped under the Jacobs label by storied underground shaper Robert “Redman” Manville. The pictures of this board come courtesy of Shred Sledz reader Steve Wray, whom you might remember for his absolutely killer Jacobs Mike Purpus V.

Surfer Magazine ran a small obituary for Redman for his passing in 2004. The obituary credits Redman as a legendary East Coast shaper. Before that, Redman had his roots in the South Bay near Los Angeles, which would explain his involvement with Jacobs, which has its roots in Hermosa Beach.

There are some interesting details about this board that I can’t quite line up with any research I was able to find online. The owner tells me the board was shaped during the 1970s, and between the unusual logo above, the airbrush and the board’s outline, I can’t imagine otherwise. However, Stoked-n-Board’s Jacobs Surfboards entry doesn’t list an owner for the brand between 1971 and 1976. Moreover, they list Manville as having shaped for Jacobs during the 1990s, with no mention of an earlier stint. Still, I would be shocked if this were a reproduction — the Redman surfboard above has all the hallmarks of a Seventies single fin.

I don’t see a signature for the airbrush anywhere, but the board’s owner speculates it might have been done by the one and only Jack Meyer. I don’t have any proof, but with the bright colors and dolphins, the airbrush definitely could have been done by Meyer.

This Redman shape might not command eye-popping prices at the next high-end auction, but that’s not the point. I absolutely love this board, starting from the contrast between the clean and simple deck and then the over the top madness of the airbrush on the bottom. In addition, I have a soft spot for well-regarded but still mostly underground shapers like Redman. More than anything else, though, I love the board because it suggests that if you’re into vintage surfboards and you’re down to explore just a tiny bit, you can find all sorts of unique little gems that have so much unseen history behind them.

Thanks again Steve for sharing the pics, and if you have a board you’d like to share, please do let me know.

Simon Anderson Nectar Thruster Ad: Sagas of Shred

Well, Shredderz, they say it’s better late than never, so accept my apologies for today’s Sagas of Shred entry, which appears a full 24 hours or so after its customary slot. But I’ll try and make it up to all eight of you with a gem. Pictured above is an ad that ran in a 1981 issue of Surfer Magazine that helped announce Simon Anderson’s thruster design to the rest of the world. I believe Anderson’s original thrusters were produced in Australia under the Energy Surfboards label. Across the pond, San Diego-based Nectar Surfboards and shaper Gary MacNabb took the reins to distribute Anderson’s revolutionary design.

If you look closely in the ad above, it even looks like Anderson is riding an Energy board, with its clearly identifiable pyramid shaped logo, and not a Nectar shape. The “3 Fin Thruster” logo in the ad looks like a rudimentary version that you’ll find on both Energy and Nectar Simon Anderson examples.

Energy Simon Anderson Thruster Logo.jpg

Amazingly, Anderson never made a dime off the thruster design, despite its ubiquity. It’s amazing that over three decades later, the thruster remains the standard fin setup for high performance surfing, although nowadays you see a number of quad fin setups when world tour pros surf places like Pipeline, etc. Matt Biolos of …Lost Surfboards attempted to rectify this a few years ago, pledging to donate $1 per thruster sold to Simon Anderson. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like Biolos’ good intentions caught on with the rest of the surf industry.

And while Simon Anderson is unlikely to ever make Warren Buffett money off of his design, his influence on the sport is beyond reproach. And surely that means a lot more than having a few extra dollars here and there. (I wouldn’t know, as I am neither rich nor historically significant, but that’s a story for another time.)

Thanks for reading and we’ll be back next week with more Sagas of Shred.

Phil Edwards Honolulu Longboard

Greetings, Shredderz! This post, like yesterday’s feature on a Zephyr single fin, is best suited for surfboard collectors with champagne tastes. What we have here is a rare example of a Phil Edwards Honolulu longboard. I’ve written before about Phil Edwards signature boards for Hobie Surfboards, which remain coveted among longboard collectors. As much as I love the Hobie Phil Edwards Model, which is an undisputed classic, I’m also partial to the Phil Edwards Honolulu run, which were made during Edwards’ time living and shaping in Hawaii during the late 1960s.

The Phil Edwards Honolulu model pictured above is currently listed for sale on Craigslist in Orange County (San Clemente, to be exact). The board has been restored, and it looks to be in great condition.

The catch, of course, is the price: a cool $2,900. I won’t get into details on the pricing here, but Phil Edwards Honolulu boards are pretty hard to come by.

If you want to check out the listing for the board, you can do so here. All pics above are via the Craigslist posting.

Finally, I’m keeping this post short and sweet because I’m planning on a longer feature on the Phil Edwards Honolulu model. Stay tuned on that one…

Vintage Zephyr Jeff Ho Surfboard

Greetings, Shredderz! As some of you may know by now, there are few things I appreciate more than 70s single fins with some real history to them. Seventies surfboard labels don’t get any more storied than legendary Zephyr Surfboards. Despite playing a critical role in the development of Southern California surf and skate culture, there isn’t a whole lot of information you can find online about Zephyr. It’s even more unusual to find Zephyr boards for sale online. However, you’re in luck, as there’s currently a vintage Zephyr Jeff Ho surfboard for sale on Craigslist in the Inland Empire. The only catch is you’ll need around $4K handy to complete the purchase.

Zephyr Jeff Ho Single Fin 3

I wish the pics were a little better, and frankly, the fact that someone decided to put stickers on the bottom of this board, getting in the way of the beautiful paint job, is as infuriating as it is puzzling. Then again, I can’t not run these pictures, because it’s not every day you  see a vintage Zephyr Jeff Ho surfboard, and this one is pretty stunning. Zephyr boards sport some pretty outrageous paint jobs, and the one pictured above is restrained in comparison, but still very colorful.

I’m wondering if the board pictured above has a CR Stecyk III airbrush, which would make the price tag a bit more digestible. Stecyk was involved in the infamous Dogtown scene’s earliest days, and nowadays he is probably better known as an artist and photographer. I have no way of knowing whether or not Stecyk might have been involved with the board above. If you have any info, hit me up!

And as for the price…well, it’s a lot of money. On the other hand, a Nathan Pratt Zephyr board was recently estimated to sell between $6K and $12K at a California Gold Surf Auction. This is a bit of a cop out, but pricing surfboards is hard. I can’t quite believe I’m typing this, but if the airbrush really is a Stecyk and there isn’t a hint of fading underneath those stickers on the bottom, then $3,800 might be in the ballpark. (I also reserve the right to change my mind, because dang, that’s a lot for a board!)

Zephyr Jeff Ho Single Fin 1

The Zephyr Jeff Ho single fin has a nice 70s Rainbow Fin, but sadly, I don’t think it’s original. Jeff Ho made some distinctive fins to go along with his Zephyr shapes. Check out some examples below, which come courtesy of Instagram user @jjrober22, who I believe also heads up the Longboard Collector’s Club.

HoHoHo;);)

A post shared by Jeff Robertson (@jjrober22) on

Zephyr Fins

A post shared by Jeff Robertson (@jjrober22) on

Finally, just as a little bonus, here’s another Zephyr Jeff Ho surfboard that I purchased a few months back. I’m mostly posting this because I’m still offended this thing only got 44 likes on Instagram!

Anyway, you can check out the listing for the vintage Zephyr Jeff Ho surfboard here.

 

Eighties Ocean Pacific Ad featuring Tom Curren: Sagas of Shred

Before we start, I’d like to make one thing clear: this might be a free country, but Shred Sledz is a blog that will not tolerate any slander of Tom Curren whatsoever. This is non-negotiable.

That said…I’d like to know who at OP in the Eighties thought it would be a good idea to cast Curren as a would-be heartthrob for these advertisements. Again, in case the previous paragraph wasn’t clear, the blame is being laid squarely at the feet of the once-ubiquitous surf brand, and not with the most stylish regular foot of all time.

But this is marketing malpractice! Why is the picture of Curren gazing off into the distance approximately eight times the size of him ripping on a signature Channel Islands Al Merrick stick?

And while I’d like to be outraged by the Ocean Pacific ad featured above…at the end of the day, I can’t bring myself to truly dislike it, no matter how ridiculous the photoshoot might be. In fact, if anyone knows where I could find a version of the shirt Curren is rocking in the ad, I’d definitely be interested (though I don’t think I’m capable of actually pulling it off).

As a palate cleanser, please enjoy Tom Curren’s first-ever wave he rode at Jeffreys Bay. Curren famously refused to visit South Africa for years, due to his objections to Apartheid. This footage was shot by the legendary Sonny Miller. Fast forward to the 1:43 mark to see some truly virtuoso level surfing:

As always, thank you for reading, and check back next Thursday for more Sagas of Shred.

Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt Single Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a board that comes courtesy of another reader. Shout out to Dan for sharing the stoke of this incredible Chuck Vinson shape (you can check him out on Instagram here). I’ve written about Chuck Vinson before. The earlier post I wrote featured a Vinson-shaped single fin that was produced under his own name. Vinson also produced boards for Lightning Bolt during its heyday of the mid-1970s, when Bolt was not just the most famous surfboard label in the world, but the surfboard brand, period. Dan had this Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt single fin shaped for him during the 1970s. Apparently Dan had Vinson shape him three boards, and this one remains.

As you can see, Dan’s Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt has all the classic lines you would expect of a 70s single fin crafted to tackle powerful Hawaiian surf. Sadly, Lightning Bolt’s well-documented struggles with intellectual property meant that their signature logo was copied throughout the decade, but the board pictured above is the real deal.

Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt 2.jpeg

By far my favorite detail about the Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt is the glass on fin, which is partially made out of wood.

Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt 1.jpeg

Wooden fins seem to have fallen out of favor recently — I’m not sure why, as you’ll still see the occasional glass on fiberglass examples — but it’s not for a lack of aesthetics!

I have actually seen another example of a Vinson board with a similar wooden fin. The example below was taken from a board Vinson made under the Santa Cruz label.

Santa Cruz Chuck Vinson Single Fin

Many thanks to Dan for sharing the photos of his incredible Chuck Vinson Lightning Bolt single fin. RIP to Mr Vinson, who sadly passed away last year. Thank you for reading, and if you have any other Chuck Vinson boards you’d like to share, please do get in touch.

Surfboards Hawaii Longboard “Blank Logo”

Greetings, Shredderz! Don’t let the tongue-in-cheek name of this humble blog fool you: we are huge fans of classy, old school surfboard brands, too. There are few labels classier than Surfboards Hawaii. For starters, Surfboards Hawaii boasts an incredible collection of shaping talent, from Dick Brewer to Ben Aipa and Donald Takayama. And if history really isn’t your bag, well, Surfboards Hawaii boards happen to look great, too. Today’s post features a vintage Surfboards Hawaii longboard with an unusual touch. Keep reading below for more…

Surfboards Hawaii Longboard 3

The Surfboards Hawaii longboard pictured above was recently listed on eBay. It sold for a tidy $899, and someone almost certainly paid shipping, given that the board was located in Indianapolis, of all places. The board has an absolutely gorgeous stringer setup with a simple but striking red, white and blue color scheme. I’m guessing it’s high density foam sandwiched between two wooden stringers, but I’m not sure.

Surfboards Hawaii Longboard.jpg
Close up of the tail and the fin.

The fin looks to be all original as well. I’m not sure what these fin boxes are called, but they are fairly common on boards from this era. I would guess the Surfboards Hawaii longboard featured here was shaped sometime during the mid-1960s or so.

One odd touch about the Surfboards Hawaii longboard in this post is the logo, or, to be exact, the lack thereof.

Surfboards Hawaii Longboard Logo.jpg
Close up of the logo on the Surfboards Hawaii longboard. It’s interesting that there’s no text anywhere in the logo; just the iconic outline of the island of Oahu.

The board’s logo is the classic Oahu outline that you see on many Surfboards Hawaii boards. However, there is no text on the logo, which is unusual. If you look closely in the photo above you’ll notice there’s a little rectangle that is less faded than the surrounding area. I’m guessing there may have been a smaller laminate that was originally located in this space, but somehow got removed or fell off.

Surfboards Hawaii Nose Rider Logo .jpg
An example of another Surfboards Hawaii logo, taken from a “Nose Rider” model. You can see the text in the Oahu outline on this board.

Pictured above is another example of a Surfboards Hawaii longboard, which comes from a “Nose Rider” model. The Nose Rider has what looks like a high density foam stringer sandwiched by two much thinner redwood stringers. One small touch I found interesting was the difference in the Oahu silhouettes in both Surfboards Hawaii logos. The blank logo has more detail around Pearl Harbor, towards the south western corner of the island.

No one loves surfboard minutiae more than I do, but with surfboards, unlike cars or watches, there really doesn’t seem to be a rhyme or reason for many of the unusual variants that pop up. I’m not quite sure how to explain this Surfboards Hawaii longboard and its blank logo. I think it easily could have been a mistake at the factory, and it’s also possible that the text was somehow rubbed off the board, too. Regardless, it’s a very cool example of an original board from a classic label, and I’m not surprised to see that it got snapped up quickly by an eagle eyed collector.

Blue Hawaii Pottz Model Ad: Sagas of Shred

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, by now you probably know that the one-man Shred Sledz staff has a soft spot for the surfboards of the 80s. And in a decade filled to the brim with colorful characters and even more eye-catching boards, Martin Potter stands out. Pottz’s “Saint” Town & Country twin fin is his most famous board. In fact, its signature green and yellow spray job is still emulated today. The Blue Hawaii Pottz Model might not be as famous, but it’s a stick that has many fans, especially for examples bearing the signature blue flame airbrush around the rails.

The photo featured above is an old Blue Hawaii ad that appeared in Surfer Magazine in 1988. Blue Hawaii was a surfboard brand that is sadly no more. I believe Blue Hawaii was founded by shaper Glenn Minami, who was the original shaper behind Pottz’s famous “Saint” twin fin. Stoked-n-Board claims Blue Hawaii was founded in 1984. I’m guessing Minami must have left Town & Country around the same time, and brought Pottz with him shortly afterwards.

The other thing that’s interesting about the ad is the customizable “bullseye” spray job that could be applied to boards. I have scoured the internet for examples of a Blue Hawaii Pottz Model with a bullseye design, but I was only able to find one. Even so, I think the example below is a custom spray job for an actual Martin Potter personal rider, versus a mass-produced version that is offered in the advertisement. I’m wondering if the board on the far right was actually the inspiration for the bullseye design in the ad.

I also can’t get enough of the shipping rates. Granted, the advertisement ran 30 years ago, but $25 to get a board shipped from Hawaii to the mainland? That is absolute madness. I’d almost take those rates over the board!

If you have any leads on some pictures of a Blue Hawaii Pottz Model with a bullseye airbrush on it, I’d love to learn more. Otherwise, thanks for reading and stop by next week for even more Sagas of Shred.