Oh Baby! Christian Fletcher Signature Model

I love surfboards in general, but I hold a special place in my heart for 80s and 90s surf culture. There’s something about the neon and the brash attitude of that era – I mean, we’re talking about a time when it was not just considered acceptable but downright cool to wear webbed gloves – that holds an inexplicable appeal.

And what better tribute to the glorious 80s than a Christian Fletcher signature board via classic 80s surf brand Town & Country? The board was originally posted on the Vintage Surfboard Collectors group on Facebook, which is required viewing for anyone who is at all interested in old surfboards. Fletcher, of course, is one of the all-time counter-culture icons in a sport that prides itself on non-conformity. I love the neon paint job on this thing, and the neon T&C logo, which must have been so cool and edgy back in the day, now feels like a warm time machine back to a more innocent time.

The board looks to be shaped by Peter Benjamin. Looks like Benjamin shaped both under his BeenJammin label (which you can see here beneath the PB icon) as well as Town & Country. According to Benjamin, the board was likely shaped somewhere between 1986 and 1989. What an awesome find!

Haut Sting(er)

This Craigslist post has a Doug Haut shape from 1976. Call it Santa Cruz by way of the North Shore. It’s an interesting shape from Haut, a legendary Santa Cruz shaper, clearly in the style of legendary Hawaiian shaper Ben Aipa’s famous Sting design. The poster claims the board has been stored indoors for 20+ years. It’s got a glassed on leash loop, which is nice for us non-Olympian swimmers, as a lot of boards from these days don’t have any options for attaching a leash. Looks like there might have been a decent ding on the bottom of the board, right beneath the logo, but otherwise it looks to be in pretty nice condition, especially for something that’s 40 years old. $400 will take it.

Hansen “The Master”

Really sweet and clean looking Hansen “The Master” model board up on eBay right now. Unrestored, apparently kept inside for most of its life, and according to the listing it has been surfed <10 times (good if you’re a buyer, but borderline negligent if you’re the seller!)

Vintage Rick Noserider Surfboard

Oh baby! This here is a Rick Surfboards longboard from what the posting claims is 1965. The Rick noserider bears serial number 1252 and it comes in at a pretty hefty 9′9″. From Stoked n Board it’s not clear if the numbering matches up to the year that’s claimed, but the logos seem to correspond to that rough time period. This one isn’t cheap – listed at $1100 – but it seems to be in pretty great condition for a board from the 60s, and it’s a great little piece of California surf history!

Great Moments in Pop Out History: Dextra

Another interesting find on Craigslist…a Dextra board from sometime in the 60s. According to the listing it is serial number 7588. Stoked n Board’s excellent resource page doesn’t have any info about when this would correspond to, but the same page indicates that logo is probably sometime in 1965. Board looks to be in great condition given that it’s 50 years old. Dextra is infamous for having produced pop outs during this time, so don’t expect the quality or craftsmanship you would with a handmade surfboard from this era. Still, for a board from the 1960s it’s in great condition.

Marc Andreini Bonzer: Alternative Tri-Fin

Another cool Andreini up on Craigslist! This is a 6′10″ Andreini Bonzer shape. Bonzers can come in a wide variety of setups, but as you can see in the pictures above, this board has two side bites complemented by a large fin in the center. The fin setup is unusual for Andreini, whose focus is largely on single fins. With that said, Andreini is a noted surf history buff, and one whose designs draw upon the tradition of many other California shapers, like Reynolds Yater.

The board is described as being a “Campbell Bros Tribute.” The Campbell Brothers invented the Bonzer tri-fin setup in 1970. Simon Anderson invented the Thruster in 1980, and Anderson is widely credited for popularizing the tri-fin setup as the default for performance shortboards. That said, it is worth noting that the respective Campbell brothers and Anderson designs are very different, and the Bonzer, while not quite as revolutionary as the thruster, is a design that endures to this day.

The Andreini Bonzer pictured above was taken from a Mike Eaton outline. Eaton was shaping for Bing Surfboards during the 1970s. Bing and the Campbell brothers collaborated on a Bing-branded Bonzer model starting in 1973. Eaton, who was then one of the head shapers at Bing, was critical in helping get the Bing Bonzer off the ground. Eaton later went on to shape under his eponymous label, where he shaped Bonzers until his untimely passing.

At $700, the Andreini Bonzer isn’t cheap, but it’s a cool and unusual board, and good luck finding any Andreinis for that much cheaper.

Andreini Camo Vaquero

I can’t believe this Andreini has been languishing on Craigslist for a few weeks now. It’s a 9′ Vaquero model, which is a little longer than usual, given that most Vaqueros are in the mid-length range. Still, it’s such a cool board, and it even sports Andreini’s signature anti-shark camouflage pattern on the bottom. Looks to be in pretty good shape, and I think the board is extremely well priced at $675 (note that no fin is included, and the fin with the board is a Greenough fin, as opposed to one of Andreini’s signature A Flexes). I own a 9′ Serena Andreini and it is a wave-catching machine, and the famous hull bottom makes it feel like you’re surfing a hovercraft at times.