Social Media Roundup: Last of the Decade

Greetings, Shredderz! Hope you are all enjoying the last few days of the decade. I can’t think of a better way to say goodbye to 2019 than by checking out some sweet sticks, so without any further ado, here are some of my favorite social media posts from the past month or so.

Stab Magazine called Tom Curren’s Maurice Cole-shaped reverse vee “the most famous board ever shaped”, and it’s hard to argue with that description. The Surfer’s Journal recently weighed in with some cool trivia, letting us know that there were two boards with the signature yellow rails and logo-less design: a 7’3″, along with the more famous 7’8″ featured in Servais’ timeless cutback photo. The existence of the nearly identical 7’3″ and 7’8″ boards is described at length in the Stab Magazine article linked in the first sentence of the caption.

Here’s where things get weird: in last month’s Social Media Roundup I featured an Instagram post from Maurice Cole himself, posing alongside an 8’0″ board with the same reverse vee, yellow rails and blank logos. Cole also claims the 8’0″ was shaped in 1991, along with the 7’3″ and 7’8″. Does this mean there are actually three reverse vee boards, and not two? I figure if anyone knows it’s Maurice Cole, but consider me intrigued.

Rob Machado is a Pipeline Master, he gets paid to travel the world and surf his brains out, and he’s also got phenomenal hair. If you find yourself running out of reasons to be jealous of the dude — who, by all accounts, is a super nice guy — he also gets Skip Frye boards for Christmas. This one is a beautiful 7’11” Frye Nozzle.

Speaking of things I’d like to see under my Christmas tree, add a Marc Andreini balsa Serena model to the list. My 9’0″ Andreini Serena is probably my favorite board of all time. You can see Marc posing alongside a different board in the picture immediately above this caption — note the White Owl logo on the deck, whereas the first board doesn’t have any logos. The logo-less Serena is actually a gift to the woman whom the board was named after, which makes it even cooler.

There’s no special significance to this shot, which was taken by multi-hyphenate Andrew Kidman. It’s just a gorgeous photo of a skilled craftsman that highlights the beauty and skill of hand shaping surfboards. RIP Allan Byrne.

The Campbell Brothers have been featured in the Social Media Roundup countless times now. They always have cool tidbits from their decades long history with one of surfing’s most enduring designs. Here’s an early Hawaiian quiver from 1983, featuring a trio of sweet sleds. Check out that Cafe Haleiwa logo on the far left!

Phil Edwards Honolulu C Series

Greetings, Shredderz! This humble vintage surfboard blog might have a soft spot for the loud stylings of the Eighties, but that doesn’t mean we’re total Philistines. In many ways, Phil Edwards can be seen as the exact opposite of the brash Echo Beach aesthetic. By all accounts, Mr. Edwards is a low-key figure, despite his outsize influence on surf history. I can’t confirm that for myself, as I haven’t had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Edwards. What I can say is that Edwards’ boards — whether it’s the Hobie Phil Edwards Model or the Phil Edwards Honolulu series — are beautiful and understated, which seems only fitting given the man’s sterling reputation.

The board featured here is a Phil Edwards Honolulu model that was recently posted for sale on Craigslist in San Diego. The listing has since been taken down, but an earlier Phil Edwards Honolulu board I wrote up is still for sale here. Edwards made very few Honolulu models. The Honolulu models are rare and coveted, but they also give a fascinating look at the evolution of surfboard design as they were shaped during the late 1960s, in the heart of the Transition Era.

Phil Edwards Honolulu C82 2.jpgPhil Edwards Honolulu C82 3.jpg

The Phil Edwards Honolulu model pictured above is from the C series with a serial number of 82. (Stay tuned for a later post explaining the differences between the various Honolulu models). It measures in at a sleek 8’10”. The seller estimated that the board was likely shaped in 1968. The board looks to be a hull shape, with a signature convex belly towards the nose. This makes sense, given the popularity of hulls during the late Sixties. As you can see, despite being nearly 9′, the board is definitely not a traditional nose rider.

The first thing I thought when I saw the board above was how similar it was to my Andreini Serena (which is my all-time favorite board). After doing some digging on Instagram, it looks like I’m not the only one who has noticed the similarity between the two boards. See the posts below for some side-by-side comparisons between the Honolulu model and some Andreini hulls:

I really dig the clean lines of the Phil Edwards Honolulu C Series. The glass on fin is a nice touch, and I love the blue high density foam stringer, too. I envision this thing really delivering on some clean, lined up point break waves.

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Close up of the tail and fin on the Phil Edwards Honolulu C Series. Pic via Craigslist.

Finally, I’m not sure what the final price ended up being, but the Phil Edwards Honolulu was originally listed at $1250. Even though the board isn’t in perfect condition, I think this is a fair price. I don’t have enough data points to back this up, but I will point to a fully restored A series model that sold at the 2018 California Gold Auction, which fetched $4,000.

If you own a Phil Edwards Honolulu board and you wouldn’t mind sharing pics, please drop me a line! As always, thanks for reading, and stay tuned for a future post on Phil Edwards’ classic Hawaiian shapes.