Late 1960s Rick Single Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! For today’s post we have a neat Transition Era board from one of my favorite surfboard brands ever: Rick Surfboards. Rick Surfboards was the eponymous label from Rick Stoner, Bing Copeland’s former business partner and South Bay, Los Angeles lifeguard. For more background on Rick Surfboards, check out this Deep Dive on the brand’s 1960s longboards, as well as this complementary piece on the Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail model. The BK model is particularly interesting because it bears a striking similarity to the Rick single fin featured here. Keep reading for a more detailed breakdown on the board.

First, the Rick single fin featured here is currently being listed for sale on Craigslist in San Diego. All pics in the post are via the Craigslist listing, which can be found here. First, shout out to the seller, who was kind enough to supply a number of very detailed pics of the board. Second, the Rick single fin measures in at 8’2″ and a generous 22.5″ width, and the seller claims the board was shaped during 1968. This date is certainly supported by the dimensions of the board, as well as the unmistakable W.A.V.E. Set fin box.

That all being said, I am struck by the similarities between the Rick single fin featured here and the Rick Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail. The BK Pintail model was also shaped during the late 1960s, and as you can see in the picture below, it boasts a similar outline. Both boards have relatively wide noses and mid-sections that taper into aggressive pintails. I have seen versions of the BK Pintail that had glassed on fins, instead of W.A.V.E. Set boxes, but as you can see below, the Pintail was clearly made with both options.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail via Surfboardline
Example of a Rick Surfboards BK Pintail. Pic via Buggs and his insane collection, which you can see more of on Surfboardline.com

Most of the Rick single fin boards I have seen are classic 70s single fins. Transition Era Rick single fin boards are a bit harder to come by (with the exception of the BK Pintail). Check out Buggs’ collection on Surfboardline.com for more examples of other late 1960s Rick boards, and you’ll notice that they have very different outlines from the single fin featured here.

My guess is the Rick single fin featured in this post is a BK Pintail model that is missing its laminates. I have no way of proving it, of course, but the outline is distinctive. Even the logo is the same (minus any mention of Barry Kanaiaupuni).

Rick Single Fin Logo
This is the same exact logo you’ll see on Rick BK Pintails — and other Rick Surfboards from that era — but there’s no mention of Kanaiaupuni anywhere.

This is not to say that the Rick single fin featured here is a rare variant. If anything, I think it’s probably reflective of the informal ways surfboards were made back then. It could even be as simple as they ran out of laminates at the factory the day this board was made, or something along those lines.

The seller is asking $300 for the board. It’s in need of some more work — again, shout out to the seller for providing such detailed pics — but in my mind, this is a fair price for a unusual Transition Era board from one of my favorite surfboard logos ever. If you’re interested, you can check out the listing here.

T&C Surf Designs Ad from 1979

Greetings, Shredderz! Yes, it is Thursday. Yes, I have another excellent vintage surf ad to share with you all! This humble little T&C Surf Designs promo comes from an issue of Surfer Magazine originally published in 1979. As you can see from the presence of numerous other brands — Rip Curl, Body Glove, Clark Foam, Quiksilver and O’Neill, among others — the ad seems to come from a time when T&C was most widely known as a surf shop, rather than one of the brands that came to define the aesthetic of the 1980s. And while Craig Sugihara founded T&C Surf Designs in 1971 as a retail operation, for most T&C fans, the brand’s roots lie in its impressive stable of shapers and surfers. The names that appear on the ad are represent some of the biggest names in modern Hawaiian surfing history.

T&C Surf Designs Craig Sugihara.jpg
T&C Surf Designs founder Craig Sugihara in front of his first shop. Pic comes from the excellent history of T&C that can be found on its website. I’m not sure when T&C dropped the ‘e’ in Towne, but this is an incredible old picture.

Note that Larry Bertlemann‘s name is actually misspelled on the advertisement. Glenn Minami and Dennis Pang are two extremely well-regarded Hawaiian shapers who are still mowing foam today.

T&C Surf Designs Glenn Minami Twin Fin.jpg
A T&C Surf Designs 1970s or early 1980s twin fin that was sold on eBay a few months back. Pic via the eBay listing.

The two names that stand out on the ad are the mention of “Dane Kealoha Designs.” As far as I know, Kealoha did not actually shape boards, unlike the other names on the list. I’m assuming that the mention of “Dane Kealoha Designs” in the advertisement was meant to capitalize on Kealoha’s status as one of the top Hawaiian pros of the time.

The other mention that took me by surprise was that of Barry Kanaiaupuni. Kanaiaupuni, of course, is one of the most famous surfer / shapers ever to grace the shores of Hawaii. BK is probably best known for his stint at Lightning Bolt, but he had a signature model for Rick Surfboards, and also shaped for Surf Line Hawaii.

I have written before about Seventies boards made by California shapers who are best known for their work in the Eighties — think of people like Lance Collins at Wave Tools, Shawn Stussy’s days at Russell Surfboards, and Peter Schroff. In those cases I have found that boards shaped before the Echo Beach craze could often be found at much cheaper prices than their Eighties counterparts. I don’t know if that theory necessarily applies to Hawaiian boards made in the 1970s. There aren’t very many T&C Surf Designs single fins that pop up for sale, and when they do, my sense is that they tend to get snapped up pretty quickly. If I get some better data on the subject, I’ll be sure to write a more in-depth post. (And if you have any sweet Seventies T&C Surf Designs boards, hit me up!).

I hope you enjoyed this look at some T&C Surf Designs goodness from the late 1970s. Make sure you tune in next week for more Sagas of Shred!

Mike Diffenderfer for Inter-Island Surf Shop: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz, and welcome to another installment of Sagas of Shred! Today’s post comes from another back issue of Surfer Magazine (Aug. – Sep. 1963, Vol. 4 No. 4). It’s an ad for Inter-Island Surf Shop. Inter-Island was home to a number of well-known surfers as both team riders and shapers. Two things stand out about this advertisement: first is the fact that at this point in time, all of Inter-Island’s boards were being shaped by Mike Diffenderfer. What struck me is how young Diff was at the time of the advertisement: in 1963, Diffenderfer was only 26 years old! The ad also has a helpful list of team riders at the time. Some of the names stand out — Fred Hemmings, Barry Kanaiaupuni, et al — and for others I’m drawing a blank. As curious as I am, I almost prefer the mystery around “Toku” and “Soyo”, whoever those fine people may be.

As always, tune in next Thursday for the next Sagas of Shred, and another blast from surfing’s storied past!

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail Personal Rider

First, if you haven’t seen the previous posts on Rick Surfboards and you’re interested in learning more about the brand, I recommend checking them out. Here are links for Part I and Part II.

Pictured above is a super rare Barry Kanaiaupuni personal rider with the Rick Surfboards logo. The pictures come courtesy of Randy Rarick / Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction. The Rick BK personal rider above was sold at the 2011 Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction. Prior to that, it was on display at the Hard Rock Cafe in Honolulu for a number of years (anyone know how I can hire that interior decorator?) Many thanks to Mr. Rarick for providing the pictures and the background on the board!

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Personal Rider Randy Rarick Logo.png
Rare version of the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Hawaii logo. I have never seen this logo before — either the cupped hands design or the Hawaii designation. Picture via Randy Rarick / Hawiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction

One of the coolest things about the BK rider — you know, besides the fact that it was ridden by BK himself! — is the logo. It is the only board I have ever seen with this Rick Surfboards Hawaii variant logo. According to Rarick, during the time when Rick Surfboards was producing its BK Pintail models, the brand opened up a store in Honolulu on Kapiolani Boulevard. Kanaiaupuni shaped some custom boards with Rick logos from their Honolulu store. My guess is the pink board pictured above was likely either shaped or sold at the Rick Surfboards Honolulu shop, hence the Hawaii logo. I’m not sure of the significance of the hands above the logo, but I am sure that it looks really, really cool.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Personal Rider Randy Rarick 3
Close up of the glass-on fin. Pic via Randy Rarick / Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction

I’m not sure when the Rick BK personal rider was shaped, but the board does have a distinct outline similar to other Transition Era boards. I imagine this board was put through its paces at Sunset!

For more on the Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction, visit the website here. Thanks again to Randy Rarick for the pictures and information in this post.

Rick Surfboards Part II: Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail (A Shred Sledz Deep Dive)

An in-depth overview of the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model surfboard produced during the Transition Era of the late 1960s

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post is Part II of our exploration of one of surfing’s most influential but still somehow underground surfboard labels: Rick Surfboards. If you missed Part I, which covers Rick noseriders and pre-Transition Era models, please check it out here. The initial version of the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model, produced starting in 1966, was a noserider. Rick Surfboards BK Model longboards continue to command high prices; one recently sold at the California Gold vintage surf auction for $2,450.

In 1967, with the Transition Era underway, Rick Surfboards released a shorter surfboard made for the steep, challenging conditions of Hawaii’s North Shore, and, of course, its namesake’s radical surfing. The end result was the Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail model.

The canvas for Kanaiaupuni’s new equipment — I’ve seen his Transition Era boards referred to as both pocket rockets and mini-guns — was big wave spot Sunset Beach. Barry K’s exploits at Sunset resulted in some iconic surf photographs, including shots from famed photographers Art Brewer and Jeff Divine.

Barry Kanaiaupuni Sunset Beach Jeff Divine 1972.jpg
Barry Kanaiaupuni and one of his signature bottom turns. Sunset Beach, 1972. Photo by Jeff Divine.

Barry Kanaiaupuni’s Early Shaping Days

From what I can tell, the longboard version of the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model was produced only during 1966 and 1967. I believe sometime in 1967 Rick Surfboards began producing the Pintail version of the BK Model. Stoked-n-Board claims the BK Pintail was produced until 1982. I find this unlikely for two reasons. First, just about every BK Pintail I have seen has a distinct Transition Era outline, which would have been outdated for the 1970s, much less the early 1980s. Second, Barry Kanaiaupuni started shaping for other brands during the early 1970s.

The Encyclopedia of Surfing tells us Kanaiaupuni began his shaping career at Rick Surfboards, followed by stints at Country Surfboards, Surf Line Hawaii, and then Lightning Bolt. This sequence makes me think Rick Surfboards ceased production on the BK Pintail well before 1982. There are many examples of boards shaped by Kanaiaupuni for other brands well before 1982: Surfboard Hoard has a Chuck Dent brand shaped by BK dated to 1969; I have seen a BK Surf Line Hawaii board dated to 1971; and Surfing Cowboys has a Lightning Bolt BK board supposedly made in 1972. Based on this evidence, I believe the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model was produced from 1967 until the early 1970s, at the latest.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail: Gun

Pictured above is an unusual example of the Rick Surfboards BK Pintail. Although dimensions for the board are not listed on the post, you can see the board has a traditional big wave gun shape. Compare this to all the examples below, which are shorter and have fuller noses paired with long, drawn out pintails. Nor is the pintail gun above a noserider, a la the board featured in the first post. The logo is interesting, too. It is the only example I have seen that reads “Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail.” All the other versions in this post read either “Barry Kanaiaupuni Model” or “Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail.” The board has been fully restored by Randy Rarick. The restoration makes me think it’s possible the logo is not all-original. See below for a pic comparing the length of the board to a Hobie Dick Brewer Model. I couldn’t find dimensions for the gun, but it looks considerably longer than all the other BK Pintails featured in this post.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model: 7’1″, 1967, Serial No. 442 (Non-Pintail Logo)

Pictured above is another Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail oddity. Pics are via the USVSA. As you can see, the board is clearly a Pintail version of the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model. However, it does not have a Pintail logo. The Rick Surfboards laminate is in the original font, too. Note the board is numbered #442 on the stringer; more on this later.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail (Various)

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Logo Closeup.jpg
Close-up of the logo on board #368. Note the updated font on Rick Surfboards, and the slight name change for the board: what was the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model has been changed to the Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail. Pic via The Vintage Surf Auction

This section focuses on “standard” versions of the Rick Surfboards BK Pintail. I define these boards as follows: they possess a Transition Era outline, with a full nose and dramatic, pulled-in pintail; and the logos bear the updated Rick Surfboards font and the “Pintail” text (versus boards that simply read “Barry Kanaiaupuni Model”).

A number of the standard Rick BK Pintails have been sold at auction recently. The picture above is from a board that sold at the Vintage Surf Auction in 2015. The Rick BK Pintail above is dated to 1967, and it has the serial #368. No dimensions are listed for #368. One thing that throws me for a loop is the ordering of the serial numbers. #442, the board with the blue fin that appeared earlier in the post, does not have the updated font on the Rick Surfboards logo, nor does it have the Pintail text. The numbering indicates #442 was made after #368, but the logo suggests otherwise.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail via Surfboardline.jpg
BK Pintail AKA Buggs’ Board. This is an all-original example of a standard Rick BK Pintail. Pics via Surfboardline.com

Buggs, the proprietor of Surfboardline.com, has a number of awesome Rick BK Pintails, which he has featured on his website and Instagram. The board above appears on Surfboardline.com. No serial number is listed for what I’ll call “Buggs’ Board.” I think it’s very possible Buggs’ Board and #368 are one and the same, but I can’t be sure without seeing pictures of the fin on #368. Buggs’ Board is all-original and it measures in at 8′ x 22″ x 2-1/2″, compared to #442, which comes in at 7’1″.

Pictured above is a 1967 Rick BK Pintail with an era-appropriate acid splash paint job. The board was sold at a USVSA event close to ten years ago. Pics are via the auction listing, which you can find here. The Acid Splash board measures in at 7’10”. Other than the rad airbrush, it looks quite similar to the other Rick BK Pintails listed above, from the silhouette down to the W.A.V.E. Set fin box.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail with Glass-On Fin

The board above comes courtesy of French surfboard site Surf-Longboard.com, and it is currently being offered for sale at €1,000. You can find a link to the board here. The French Board measures in at 7’4″. It has a very similar outline and length to the other Rick BK Pintails posted above.

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail Glass On Fin
Close up of the fin on the French Board. The fin looks different — it has more rake and is thinner towards the tip — than its counterparts on the Acid Splash Board and #442. You can also see a bit of color towards the base of the fin. Pic via Surf-Longboard.com

The thing that stands out about the French Board is its glass-on fin. This is the only example I have seen without a W.A.V.E. Set fin box. The French Board also has some nice pin lines, reminiscent to #442.

There are a few Instagram posts that show off the details of the tail on the French Board. I assume this is true of the other Rick BK Pintails as well, but it’s difficult to say without any close-up pics.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail with Signature

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail Mini Gun.JPG
The only triple stringer version of the Rick BK Pintail I have seen to date. Also note the signature on the bottom right. I can’t say for sure that it’s legitimate, but it’s promising!

The yellow board shown above is the only Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model I have seen that looks like it was signed by BK himself. The board was previously posted for sale on SurfnHula.com. You can find the link here. I don’t know whether or not this is a genuine BK signature. I have seen a variety of boards signed by BK, and his signature seems to vary.

Like the gun at the top of the post, the Triple Stringer board has two additional stringers.  It’s interesting the note the Triple Stringer board has been labeled a “Pocket Rocket.” The Triple Stringer’s dimensions are 7’9″ x 20-1/2″, putting it line with the other standard Rick BK Pintails featured here.

 

Conclusion

There you have it — every single Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Pintail I have ever laid eyes on. I’m still bursting with questions: did BK shape all of these, or did Rick Surfboards use a ghost shaper? (I’m leaning towards the latter). What were the exact years during which the Rick BK Pintails were produced? How to explain the varying lengths of the boards — were they offered in different pre-set sizes? And, perhaps most importantly, are these boards every bit as cool as they look? As always, if you have any additional information or pics about the wonderful Rick Barry Kanaiaupuni Model, please give me a shout!

Check out the earlier post in the Rick Surfboards Deep Dive series here. Coming soon is Part III, in which we will delve into the beautiful single fins Rick Surfboards produced during the 1970s.

Photo Credit at the top of the page: Barry Kanaiaupuni surfing Sunset Beach, 1969. Photo by the peerless Art Brewer.

 

 

 

Rick Surfboards: A Shred Sledz Deep Dive (Part I)

Rick Surfboards is a surfboard label that should be more famous than it is. I admit, part of this stance is informed by my own extensive biases, starting with the fact I have a soft spot for Rick’s clean and classy logos. Setting aside these preconceptions, though, Rick Surfboards boasts a rich history intertwined with some of California surf culture’s most notable figures. Sadly, Stoner’s premature passing in 1977 brought an early end to a label whose influence can still be felt today. Today’s post is an exploration of the early history of Rick Surfboards, and the shapes it produced during the mid-1960s. This is the first part in a series. As always, if you have additional information on Rick Surfboards, please drop me a line!

Part I: History — Bing & Rick

Rick Surfboards is the eponymous label of Rick Stoner. Stoner was a native of the South Bay of Los Angeles, hailing from Hermosa Beach. In 1955 Stoner decamped to Hawaii alongside friend Bing Copeland. Even in the 1950s the North Shore of Oahu was a proving grounds for the emerging surf scene. Bing and Rick surfed until their funds ran out, then joined the Coast Guard reserves, where they were lucky enough to be stationed on a ship in Hawaii.

Rick & Bing Makaha
I believe Rick Stoner is pictured at the far left, and Bing Copeland is in the white boardshorts at the right. Makaha, 1950s. I’m not sure who the other two surfers are, although there’s a very similar version of this picture in the Easy Reader News.
Bing Copeland Rick Stoner New Zealand Piha Surf Club.jpg
Bing Copeland (left) and Rick Stoner, paying a visit to the Piha Surf Club in New Zealand in 1958. I believe Piha was a lifesaving club, hence the outfits on Bing and Rick. During this visit, Bing and Rick introduced New Zealand to modern lightweight foam surfboards. Pic via Piha

The two would later become business partners: in late 1959, following a trip to New Zealand, they opened Bing and Rick Surfboards in Hermosa Beach.

Bing & Rick Surfboards Logo.png
Bing & Rick’s cheeky original logo. Pic via Bing Surfboards

According to Copeland, shortly after opening up their shop, Rick decided to focus on being a full-time lifeguard, selling his shares of the business to Bing in the process. The newly renamed Bing Surfboards went on to become one of the most recognizable and influential surf brands in the world.

At some point, Stoner must have had second thoughts about the surfboard business. As best I can tell (mostly from the Stoked-n-Board entry for the brand), Stoner established Rick Surfboards in 1963.

Rick Surfboards Ad 1964.jpg
Rick Surfboards ad from 1964. Pic via Harbour Surfboards

Part II: Rick Surfboards from the Longboard Era (Mid 1960s)

Before the dawn of the Transition Era and shortboards, Rick Surfboards, like every other surfboard manufacturer at the time, initially focused on producing beautiful old-school longboards. Examples of 1960s Rick Surfboards longboards are highly coveted and demand high prices at auctions. Here is a rundown of some of the best-known early Rick Surfboards models.

 

Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model Longboard

The Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model is one of its most famous designs. Produced in conjunction with the legendary Hawaiian surfer, The Barry Kanaiaupuni Model first hit shelves in 1966. For the first few years, the BK signature model was a traditional noserider. This changed when the Transition Era hit (more on that later). There’s a great example of a Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni model that was listed on eBay. The auction was pulled, so there is no final price associated with the board, but the initial asking bid of $2,500 is telling (as is the fact the seller, Brett7873, has sold a number of collectible boards before.) See below for pictures:

According to the seller, the Barry Kanaiaupuni model above was produced in 1966. The dimensions are 9’6″ x 21-1/2″ x 3″. The board has been restored by none other than Hawaiian surfboard whisperer Randy Rarick, which is the next-best thing to being completely original. One last important note about the board: even though Kanaiaupuni went on to famously shape boards at Lightning Bolt, it’s unclear whether or not he shaped these Rick boards, or merely leant his name to them.

 

Rick Surfboards Dru Harrison Improvisor Model

Rick Surfboards also released the Dru Harrison Improvisor model in 1966. Dru Harrison was a well-regarded pro in the 1960s. Like Stoner, Harrison hailed from Hermosa Beach.

Rick Surfboards Ad Dru Harrison.jpg
Dru Harrison in a Rick Surfboards promo shot. Photographer unknown. Pic via the Encyclopedia of Surfing

Here are some pictures of a recent Improvisor model that was listed for sale on Craigslist (board has since been purchased). The dimensions of the Dru Harrison Improvisor example are 9’0″ x 20-1/2″ x 2-7/8″. I believe this board is all original, other than some repairs that were made.

The seller claims the Dru Harrison Improvisor above was produced in 1967. Production of the Improvisor ended in 1970, according to Stoked-n-Board. During this time, Rick Surfboards released a number of different logos for the Improvisor. However, I have yet to see any examples of genuine vintage boards bearing the alternate Improvisor logos. Here’s an example of an alternate Dru Harrison Improvisor logo, but I believe this board was part of Matt Calvani’s recent run of Rick reproductions.

As for the collectibility of the Rick Surfboards Dru Harrison Improvisor Model, it is difficult to say. I haven’t seen any Improvisors sold at auction recently. The one data point I have is an eBay sale that took place almost six years ago. You can find the link here. The board sold for just under $3K, and apparently it had a very low serial number (#67). Sadly, there are no pics on the listing any longer.

 

Rick Surfboards UFO Model

Rick Surfboards also produced the UFO Model longboard between 1966 and 1968, according to S-n-B. The UFO Model had a bunch of advanced features at the time of its release, including an interesting scooped out tail, a step deck, and a teardrop concave design on the nose. These features were incorporated to improve the UFO Model’s noseriding capabilities. Adam Davenport of Davenport Surfboards has a nice writeup of the UFO Model’s functionality, which you can find on his personal website here.

Rick Surfboards UFO Model Tail Close Up.JPG
Close up of the Rick Surfboards UFO Model tail. Notice the pronounced concave in the deck at the tail, which creates a corresponding rounded bottom. Pic via Davenport Surfboards

Here’s another example of a Rick Surfboards UFO Model. Pics below are from an old Craigslist posting (board is no longer for sale). The multiple stringer configuration is a common characteristic of the Rick UFO. On an aesthetic note, I love the logos, particularly the ones framing the stringer.

The UFO Model can be seen on the far left in the gallery above; it is the board with the blue / green fin and the quadruple stringers (two center stringers, and then one on either edge). The seller listed the board at 10’0″ and claims it was made in 1967. The asking price was $1300, but seeing as the board sold on Craigslist (if at all), I have no insight into the final closing price.

Rick Surfboards UFO 10'.jpg
Rick Surfboards UFO Model 10′. Pic via Mollusk Surfboards.
Rick Surfboards UFO Logo.png
Alternate version of the Rick Surfboards UFO Model logo. I suspect this logo is from a later run (late-1960s versus mid-1960s). I say this because the font was later used on many Rick Surfboards models produced during the 1970s. Pic via TJ Carr on Pinterest

 

Rick Surfboards Assorted Noseriders

There are other longboard models that Rick Surfboards produced during the mid 1960s, but I have yet to see any examples for many of them. It’s difficult to comment on the rarity and collectibility of these boards. For example, I have only seen one D&B Pintail Model, and that was submitted to The Surfboard Project. Here’s a smattering of some random Rick pre-Transition Era noseriders::

Pictured above is a beautiful 9’9″ Rick Surfboards noserider with the classic old-school logo. I love the double laminates on the deck. It has serial number #1252, and the seller claims the board dates to 1965. This board has been listed on and off Craigslist for a while now. The seller has been holding firm at $1200, which I think is reasonable for an all-original 1960s Rick, but apparently I’m in the minority, judging from the fact the board has yet to sell. You can find a link here.

Rick Longboard 10'6 1Rick Longboard 10'6

Pictured above is another Rick Surfboards longboard. Check out the beefy stringer. It’s also interesting to note the tail block and the glassed-on fin. The Rick Surfboards logo appears to be a few shades of blue lighter than the double-logo version above. This board is listed at 10’6″; pics via an old Craigslist posting.

Here’s a Rick Surfboards model with a rare “Tripper” laminate. Check out the Rick logo on the fin, too! I have never seen this model before, and I haven’t been able to find any other information about it online. Stoked-n-Board has no mention of a Tripper model. Pics via an old Craigslist listing. According to the poster, this may be an experimental board that never saw the light of day. The wedge stringer is taken from the Improvisor Model, and you’ll notice the similarities between the Tripper fin and the one on the Barry Kanaiaupuni Model.

Finally, see above for an example of a Rick Surfboards Noserider with a corresponding logo. Pics via Island Trader Surf Shop, who date the board to 1966. This is a pretty unusual logo, that I have only seen on a few boards. The board measures 10’1″.

 

As always, my sincere thanks for making it this far through the post. As mentioned earlier, this is the first post in a series that will cover the history of Rick Surfboards. Subsequent posts will cover Rick Surfboards’ Transition Era models — including the famous Barry Kanaiaupuni Pintail — as well as Rick’s transition to the 1970s and single fins produced under the stewardship of Phil Becker. Stay tuned and Happy Shredding!

Shred Sledz Social Media Roundup (July 26)

Greetings, Shredderz! As always, here’s a sampling of some of the finest surfboard pictures recently found on the world wide web…

As I’ve written before, Lightning Bolt’s notoriety in the 1970s was a double-edged sword. The label’s popularity meant the signature bolt design was slapped on boards that had nothing to do with its Hawaiian bloodlines. Pictured above is a nice selection of genuine articles, via the Australian National Surfing Museum.

 

Yup, another classic piece of Hawaiian surf history, this time presented by the Lost & Found Collection. L&FC came about when its founder discovered boxes of pristine surf photography slides from the 1970s at a flea market. It has since blossomed into a wonderful project that supports surf photographers and the history of surfing. I highly recommend checking out the site and following them on Instagram, too. Pictured above is Larry Bertlemann alongside one of his signature Pepsi surfboards. Dying to know who the shaper might be…if anyone has more info, drop me a line!

 

If you object to the above post on the grounds that it’s not vintage enough, then I’d like to politely refer you to Andy Irons’ gesture in the photo. Happy belated birthday to The Champ, the only surfer to take on Slater during his prime and win.

 

Finally, I figured we’d throw our Aussie friends a little bone. Pictured above is Wayne Lynch with the first ever surfboard he shaped! It’s great to see a close up photo of this board, and one in color. For more on Lynch’s early boards, check out this earlier post, which is still one of the pieces of which I am proudest.

 

Early 1960's #consurfboards #🐖 #singlefinlog

A post shared by CORE SURF (@core_surf) on

Just a beautiful 1960s Con Surfboards log in lovely condition. Check out that D Fin! Love the color of the stringer…I love everything about this board, really.

Surf Line Hawaii: Shred Sledz Deep Dive

Greetings, Shredderz, and welcome to the latest Shred Sledz Deep Dive! Today’s Deep Dive features a venerable Hawaiian surf brand that has long deserved a closer look: Surf Line Hawaii. Before I get into the history, though, let’s skip right to the good stuff: pictures of awesome surfboards.

First up is a single fin shaped by none other than respected Hawaiian shaper Dennis Pang. Pang got his start at Surf Line Hawaii in 1976, before moving on to some of the most recognizable Hawaiian brands, like Lightning Bolt, Town & Country, and Local Motion. The board below was originally listed on eBay (pics originally found on the eBay post).

This thing is clean and mean. I love the black & white color scheme and the pinlines, with just a touch of color on the logos on both rails. I was a bit stunned when the board didn’t sell for $450, considering that another Surf Line board by Dennis Pang sold for $1800 ten years ago!

Surf Line Hawaii History

Surf Line Hawaii began as a surf shop on Oahu. It was founded by Dave Rochlen, and I believe Fred Swartz as well. By the time the shortboard revolution started in earnest, the shop began to put out boards under its own label.

I was blown away when I saw all the well-regarded shapers who passed through Surf Line over the years. According to Stoked-n-Board, Ben Aipa, Randy Rarick, Tom Parrish and Michel Junod, in addition to the aforementioned Dennis Pang, all shaped for Surf Line at some point!

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Aipa for Surf Line Hawaii. Board was made for Tony Moniz in 1981. Tony is a former pro and father to Josh and Seth, two up-and-coming Hawaiian pros in their own right. Pic taken from Boardcollector.com

However, I was even more shocked when I found out that Lightning Bolt’s famed core group — Gerry Lopez, Reno Abellira and Barry Kanaiaupuni — were all early Surf Line shapers. Lopez actually spent some time working in Surf Line’s offices on the business side.

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Gerry Lopez working at his “first real job” in the Surf Line Hawaii offices on Oahu, 1972. Picture via Gerry’s personal website.

Here is a great Surfer Magazine interview with Tom Parrish that expands on how a bunch of Surf Line employees broke away to found Lightning Bolt. Bolt was founded by Lopez and Jack Shipley, the latter being Surf Line’s top salesman at the time. Shortly thereafter, Reno, Barry and co followed Lopez and Shipley out the door. It’s really saying something when it’s hard to find space to mention Dick Brewer‘s involvement with Surf Line, as well!

Surf Line Hawaii Surfboards

The board pictured below was shaped by Barry Kanaiaupuni. It was sold at the Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction in 2007, where it went for a mere $1,000 (anyone have a time machine handy?) Pics were taken from the auction site (original link here). I love everything about this board: the listing calls the bottom a “root beer” color, the purple fin pops, and I love the logo, with its clean lines and two-tone color job.

After Lopez left to found Lightning Bolt, Buddy Dumphy took the lead on shaping boards at Surf Line. Lopez writes about Dumphy in his memoir “Surf Is Where You Find It”. Patagonia’s website has a great excerpt from Lopez’s memoir, “Surf is Where You Find It”, where Lopez describes his early friendship with Dumphy and their early experiences riding new surfboard designs.

I’m fascinated by Dumphy’s boards. While they seem to be coveted by a segment of collectors, Dumphy shapes don’t seem to generate the same excitement as those from shapers like Barry K, Reno, and of course Gerry himself. Still, Lopez’s respect for Dumphy speaks volumes about his abilities as a shaper. Sadly, Dumphy passed away as the result of a car accident sometime in the 1990s.

The single coolest Dumphy board I was able to find online was posted by HolySmoke.jp. I have no clue if the board is for sale but that airbrush is absolutely killer!

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The 70s were a great decade for surfboard airbrushes…

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Here’s another Dumphy single fin, which was also sold at the Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction in 2007. I love the plumeria logo on the deck. It looks like this thing was shaped in the 70s for some serious North Shore surf. Pics taken from the original auction listing.

 

I was able to find a few Dumphy boards currently for sale online. There’s one currently for sale at New Jersey’s Brighton Beach Surf Shop, and it’s only listed at $450. Link to the board can be found here. I think it’s underpriced, considering the history of both the brand and Dumphy, but then again, the Pang board at the top of the page failed to clear the same $450 mark.

Surfboardhoard.com has a different Dumphy Surf Line Hawaii single fin for sale, but they don’t list the price. I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that it’s north of $450. You can find that board here.

Surf Line Hawaii has such a rich history and a deep stable of shapers, it makes it hard to spotlight just a few boards! Standard Store / UsedSurf.jp are selling two other 70s single fins. Note that because the boards are in Japan, the prices are much higher. But they illustrate the wide variety of cool logos that Surf Line employed throughout the years. Boards can be found here and here (pictures below taken from Usedsurf.jp). The boards are credited to Steve Wilson / Welson (guessing the difference is a translation issue), but I couldn’t find any evidence of a shaper by that name. If anyone has some details, let me know!

 

Finally, no Surf Line Hawaii post would be complete without a mention of Randy Rarick. In addition to organizing the Triple Crown of Surfing, putting on auctions like the aforementioned Hawaiian Islands Vintage Surf Auction, Rarick restores old surfboards. There is currently a Surf Line Hawaii board for sale on eBay that Rarick restored. The board is not a Rarick shape, but rather, it was made in 1971 by Ryan Dotson. You can find a link to the board here, and I have included some pictures below as well. (Pictures are from the eBay listing.)

Surf Line Hawaii: Odds and Ends

Believe it or not, I haven’t even covered all of the Surf Line Hawaii shapers, like Rick Irons and Sparky Scheufele! If nothing else, that speaks to the incredibly deep collection of shapers that passed through the brand over the years. Sadly, Surf Line Hawaii no longer seems to be in business. It seems as if they stopped producing surfboards long ago (I would guess sometime in the 1980s or 1990s, but that is just a guess), and a Yelp listing indicates that Surf Line’s Honolulu retail location has closed, too.

Nonetheless, Surf Line Hawaii played a prominent role in the Hawaiian surf scene, and remains one of the most impressive collections of shaping talent ever.

I hope you enjoyed this Deep Dive! If you have any pictures of any Surf Line boards you would like to share, or any comments at all, please reach out via the Contact section. Thank you for reading, and may your stoke levels remain high and rising!

Featured Image at top from @aipasurf on Instagram. Original link to photo here.