Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight Model

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post is a relatively short one. Don’t worry, we’ve got some more in-depth stuff in the works. In the meantime, though, there are some great vintage surfboards out there on the internet, and I would be remiss if I didn’t mention them. Up here we have a truly classic longboard: The Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight model. There’s currently one up for sale on Craigslist in Ventura. You can find a link to the board here. All of the photos in this post are via the Craigslist link.

Bing Surfboards has produced many memorable boards during its run, but the Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight stands out as a particularly beautiful longboard. I wrote an earlier post about the Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight Model. The Nuuhiwa Lightweight is not to be confused with the Bing David Nuuhiwa Noseriding Model. In 1968 the Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight got a redesigned logo and a pintail. Surfboardline.com has a great example of a Nuuhiwa Lightweight with a pintail. This eventually transitioned into the Bing Pintail Lightweight — yes, the names all sound awfully similar to one another — before the Transition Era went into high gear with models like the Bing Karma and the Bing Foil.

Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight Fin and Tail.jpg
Love the clean lines of a glassed-on fin. Looks like some repairs might have been done but it still looks great.

The board pictured above was shaped in 1967. One of the giveaways is the almond-shaped logo. We know this because someone posted the board to the Classic Bing Surfboards group on Facebook. Bing himself is active in the group, and whenever cool older boards pop up, he’ll often go back to his order books and produce a certificate for authenticity.

You can see the yellow Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight model was shaped in August 1967 and has the serial number #7918. Thank goodness that Bing kept such careful records of his boards. It’s amazing to step back and think that over half a century later, some of these surfboards are still in good condition, and have come full circle.

Now, the catch is the price — the Craigslist seller is asking $2,700. I don’t have references for what the Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight models fetch at auction, but clearly the seller isn’t about to let this go for a song. Nor should he — this is a rare older board in pretty fantastic condition. I suppose all of this is a very long way of saying I don’t know whether or not this is a great price. I’m happy to say, however, that it is a very cool board. If you’re interested in seeing the listing, check it out here.

Finally, I can’t recommend the Classic Bing Surfboards Facebook group enough. See below for some awesome Bing David Nuuhiwa Lightweight ads that group members posted earlier. Thanks for reading!

Yes, Yet Another Bing Bonzer

If you’re getting sick of me writing about Bing Bonzers…well, you might want to reconsider your Shred Sledz patronage. And trust me, this is not a blog that can afford to lose any more readers! But I digress — pictured here is a certifiably bitchin’ Bing Bonzer that’s currently for sale on Craigslist in Orange County, California. All pics in this post are via the Craigslist listing, which you can find here.

I don’t like to think of myself as a grouchy old guy grumbling about how they don’t make ’em like they used to…but it’s hard not to look at the fifty-year-old board pictured above and come to that exact conclusion. In particular, I can’t stop looking at the resin pinlines. They are so clean and subtle but also make the board pop. The color combo is incredible, too. Overall, the surfboard is striking without seeming at all excessive.

Bing Bonzer Tail and Fin.jpg
This is a beautiful surfboard. The End.

How sexy is that matching fin, too?! You can also see the signature deep double concave in the photo above, as well as the Bonzer branded side bites. I love the contrast between the sharp lines of the side bites and then the pronounced curves of the concave in the tail. I think the Bing Bonzer is one of the most beautiful shortboards that has ever been created.

Now, as for the price: the seller is asking $800. I have seen better deals on boards like this, but I have also seen much worse. And while it seems like Bing Bonzers aren’t ultra rare, they don’t often pop up for sale, and the condition can always be a crap shoot. This example has some noticeable heel dents on the deck, and some nicks scattered throughout, but the most important aspects of the board have been well preserved over the years. Of course, I haven’t seen the board in person myself, so standard caveats apply. Provided there aren’t any issues with the board that aren’t shown in the pictures, I think this is a pretty fair price for a genuine Bing Bonzer.

There’s no telling who shaped it — possibly Mike Eaton, I guess — nor are any dimensions listed. You can check out the Bing Bonzer on Craigslist here.

Grab Bag: Seventies Single Fin Selections

Greetings, Shredderz! Welcome to another installment of the Grab Bag, where I’ll happily point you in the direction of some really rad boards that are currently on sale. There are currently some great Seventies single fin surfboards floating around various corners of the internet, and here at Shred Sledz we see it as our duty to keep all you fine folks informed. Keep reading below for more…

Seventies Herbie Fletcher Single Fin (eBay)

Herbie Fletcher Dana Point Logo .jpg

I actually featured this board on my Instagram a few days back. First of all, I dig the swallow tail single fin combo. Actually, let me rewind: first of all, Herbie Fletcher is a legend, and for whatever reason, he doesn’t seem to shape boards that often these days. This Seventies Herbie shape looks to be in pretty good condition. It’s listed at $1,100, which I think is a bit on the steep side, but that’s not for me to decide.

Seventies Nectar Single Fin (Craigslist — Malibu)

Click the photos to enlarge. This Nectar Surfboards single fin looks like it could have been leaning against the wall of a house from “Boogie Nights.” The Seventies aesthetic is an easy punching bag for design snobs, but who cares?!. The painstaking spray job is truly a sight to behold, and there’s a bonus in the form of a lovely original Rainbow fin, too. The seller has listed this at $900. (I also happened to feature another Nectar board on Instagram today, too.)

Bing Seventies Single Fin (Craigslist — Santa Cruz)

Here’s a rad Bing surfboard with a very cool matching fin as well. This board is only $200, which I think is a great deal when you consider the fin is included. The Bing Seventies single fin has seen better days, for sure, but I think this is a great pickup.

Infinity Seventies Single Fin (Craigslist — North Carolina)

Infinity Seventies Single Fin.jpg

I wrote up a different Infinity surfboard last week, and it looks like that one is still for sale. Anyway, the one above is yet another swallow tail single fin, and it’s got an awesome spray job. Original fin is included, too. No price is listed on the ad but it’s definitely a lovely example of a vintage Infinity Surfboards stick.

Price Checks: Vintage Bing Bonzer

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we are featuring a beautiful little vintage Bing Bonzer that sold on eBay for $800. You can find a link to eBay listing here; all photos in this post are via the listing.

My take is this is a good price for a very cool board. By contrast, I wrote up another Bing Bonzer, albeit one in much better condition, that sold on eBay for $1,100. The Bing Bonzer looks to be pretty good condition, especially considering its age.

When I first saw the vintage Bing Bonzer pictured below, it almost looked like a stubby-esque outline. However, I was surprised to see the dimensions: 8′ x 21 3/4″ x 2 1/4″.

Vintage Bing Bonzer Nose.jpgVintage Bing Bonzer Side.jpg

I really love the prominent beak in the nose. This board looks like it has tons of paddling power. The subtle pinlines on the deck and the cream and blue colorway are both beautiful touches, too.

I can’t help but compare this Bing Bonzer to other examples I have seen. The first thing that stands out to me is the Bonzer logo that appears on the side bites. See below for a close up from the board that just sold on eBay:

Vintage Bing Bonzer Fins.jpg

Now, see below for three other Bing Bonzers I have written up previously. You’ll notice the Bonzer logo is different on the three boards below. The text is in all caps and it’s not quite as “round” as the font on the white eBay vintage Bing Bonzer, for lack of a better word.

In addition, the entire tail end of the eBay Bing Bonzer looks different from other examples I have seen. The white eBay board has a much more mellow double concave in the tail compared to the extreme scooped-out design of the three Bing Bonzers above. In addition, the eBay board has a round tail. One other random note: I have seen a different version of the Bing logo that includes the word “Bonzer” in it, which is different from the standard Bing logo on the deck of the eBay board.

It seems clear to me that the eBay board is a different model than the trio of Bing Bonzers pictured above. However, I’m not sure which came earlier — the Bonzers with the super deep tail concaves and the all caps logo on the side bite fins, or the eBay board. It’s also possible they were produced at the same time, but I think that’s less likely. A knowledgeable friend thinks the eBay board might be a later version of the Bing Bonzer, but I can’t confirm any of this. According to the Campbell Brothers’ website, the Bing Bonzer was only produced between 1973 and 1975 at the latest.

If you have any clues about the dates different vintage Bing Bonzer boards were produced, please let me know! Finally, you can find a link to the board featured in this post here.

 

Concave for Days: Bonzer Tails

Greetings, Shredderz! If you’re a regular reader of the blog by now you know that I have a soft spot for the Bonzer. The Bonzer is a board I have written up numerous times, and I don’t expect that to stop any time soon! As the title suggests, this post will focus on the dramatic concave that you see in early versions of the Bonzer. A friend read some of my earlier posts on the Campbell Brothers‘ iconic design, and was kind enough to send some close up shots of a few of the Bonzers he owns. Give him a follow on Instagram when you get a chance. He has an insane collection with a lot of gems from Santa Barbara-area shapers.

Vintage Campbell Brothers Bonzer TailVintage Campbell Brothers Bonzer Tail 1

As you can see, the photos really give you a great idea of just how extreme the double concave is in the tail. Pictured above is a vintage Campbell Brothers Bonzer, which I would guess was shaped sometime during the Seventies. I’m still tripping out on the curvature of the fin box, which looks like it was modified to fit the bottom contours of the board.

Vintage Bing Bonzer TailVintage Bing Bonzer Tail 1

The second board is a Bing Bonzer, which I think was also shaped during a similar time period. Check out those branded side bite fins! The tail of the board is practically scooped out, which would have helped create water flow out the back. I am far from an expert on fluid dynamics, though, so rather than butcher the science behind this influential design, I’ll instead refer you to Malcolm and Duncan Campbell’s helpful rundown on Bonzer mechanics.

Finally, you can see a comparison between the Bing Bonzer and the Campbell Brothers model at the very top of the page. As you can see, the two vintage Bonzers are extremely similar to one another, which shouldn’t come as a surprise, given that the Campbell Brothers actively worked on the Bing version alongside Bing Copeland and Mike Eaton.

Thanks to Jesse for supplying the pics for the post! And if you have any photos of any rad boards you’d like to see featured here, don’t hesitate to reach me by email, or DM me on Instagram.

Bing Bonzer Surfboard Price Check

Greetings, Shredderz! As you may know by now, I’m an unabashed admirer of the Bing Bonzer (and heck, bonzers in general). I’ve written up numerous Bing Bonzers before, and as long as cool examples keep popping up, that trend will continue. The Bing Bonzer surfboard featured in this post recently sold on eBay, which is a great opportunity to get some good info on what these boards command on the open market. Keep reading below for some more information on the board…

The Bing Bonzer surfboard featured here is in great condition. If you’re dead set on nitpicking, it looks like there might be a few tiny pressure dings on the bottom. Otherwise, it looks pretty pristine. The Bing Bonzer surfboard also has some beautiful colors. I love the combination of the deep cherry red pigmentation on the bottom and the subtle cobalt blue pin lines on the deck. I’m a sucker for the branded side bite fins, and on this board they are in great original condition. Finally, the Bing Bonzer surfboard comes complete with a Rainbow fin. The posting isn’t clear, but if I had to guess, I would say the board is entirely original. All in all, it’s a stunning board.

As you can see from the eBay listing, this Bing Bonzer surfboard sold for a cool $1,100. Even though the board is in great condition and has some wonderful touches, I was still a bit surprised by the high price. Moreover, the board was available only for local pickup in northern Florida.

Is the board worth the money? Well, that’s not really for me to say. Nonetheless, given the rarity of these boards, and the enduring appeal of the Campbell Brothers’ design, I wouldn’t be surprised if stellar examples of Bing Bonzers continue to climb in value over the years.

Foiled: Mystery Bing Single Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a very interesting example from one of the all-time great American surfboard brands: Bing Surfboards. Pictured below is a vintage Bing single fin that is currently for sale on Craigslist in Orange County, California. You can find a link to the board here. Pics below are via the listing.

A few things about the board stand out. First, the board looks fantastic. The seller claims the Bing single fin pictured above was shaped in 1981. If so — and I have no reason to dispute the date — the board is in great condition for its age. It’s also hard to miss the detailed airbrush on the bottom. If you look closely at the left-most picture, you’ll notice the airbrush extends to the rails, too. In fact, the airbrush on the rails looks like a more subtle version of the signature look of Mike Eaton Bonzers.

Eaton Bonzer 6'7" 1.jpg
Classic example of a Mike Eaton Bonzer. Check out the detailed airbrush on the rails, which is very similar to the design on the Bing single fin above. Pic via eBay

Eaton, of course, famously shaped under the Bing label for many years. Stoked-n-Board claims Eaton was shaping for Bing between 1965 and 2001, and given the airbrush design, I think it’s very possible the board pictured above was made by Eaton. That said, the listing does not mention an Eaton signature anywhere, nor is one visible in any of the pictures.

The other interesting thing about the Bing single fin pictured above is the phoenix logo on the bottom of the board.

Vintage Bing Single Fin Surfboard 10.jpg
Close up shot of the phoenix logo found on the bottom of the vintage Bing single fin. And how about that paint job?! Pic via Craigslist

The Bing single fin above is interesting because it is the only time I have ever seen the Bing phoenix logo appear on a board that was not a Bing Australian Foil or a Maui Foil model. When I initially saw the board for sale, I figured it was an Australian Foil that I had simply never seen before. However, every other Australian Foil and Maui Foil I have seen has also had a script laminate with the model name. I do not believe the Bing single fin at the top of the page is an Australian or Maui Foil model.

Bing Australian Foil Logo.jpg
Clean example of a Bing Australian Foil logo. You’ll notice the phoenix design is the same

Furthermore, the “eye” Bing Surfboards logo is off-set on the Foil Models to make room for the script laminates. On the Bing single fin at the top of the page, though, the Bing Surfboards “eye” logo is centered beneath the phoenix laminate.

Does the presence of the phoenix logo on a non-Foil Bing single fin mean anything special? Honestly, I doubt it. But I always love examples of unusual vintage surfboards, and the Bing single fin above certainly seems to fit the bill. It’s being offered for sale on Craigslist and the price is $550. If you’re interested, you can check out the board here.

Shred Sledz Grab Bag: David Nuuhiwa Edition

Greetings, Shredderz! After yesterday’s detour to the darker corners of surf industry advertising, we’re back to our regularly scheduled programming: sweet vintage sticks for your shralping (or collecting!) pleasure. Today’s Shred Sledz Grab Bag focuses on the boards of one of the coolest cats to ever paddle out: none other than the legendary David Nuuhiwa. We’ve written up Nuuhiwa’s designs before, but it just so happens there are a number of David Nuuhiwa surfboards for sale at the moment. Keep reading for a selection of Nuuhiwa boards that are currently listed for sale:

1966 Bing David Nuuhiwa Noseriding Model (eBay)

David Nuuhiwa Surfboards Bing DN Noserider 1966 3.jpg

There are many different David Nuuhiwa surfboards, but his earliest models just might be the most famous. Note: Bing Surfboards released not one but two David Nuuhiwa models in the 1960s. One was the David Nuuhiwa Lightweight; the other was the David Nuuhiwa Noseriding Model. I wrote about an extremely rare DN Lightweight model with a floral cloth overlay earlier, which you can find here. Anyway, the board pictured above is an absolute cherry. It is an all-original Bing DN Noseriding Model that dates to 1966, and it has been verified by Bing himself. The seller is asking $11K, which strikes me as pretty ambitious. That said, it’s rare to find these boards in such great condition.

There are a few other DN longboards floating around online. For example, there’s another Bing DN Noseriding Model on eBay, which you can find here. If you’re more of a Lightweight guy, there is a Bing DN Lightweight Pintail on Craigslist (Rhode Island), which you can find here. Note the Lightweight Pintail has been refinished. Neither board is cheap, either: the second DN Noseriding Model is listed at $3,500; and the seller for the Bing DN Lightweight Pintail is asking $2,600.

And if you’re into unofficial David Nuuhiwa surfboards, here’s Tudor Surfboards’ take on the classic DN Noseriding Model design.

1970s Dyno David Nuuhiwa Single Fin (Craigslist)

By all appearances, David Nuuhiwa’s visual style during the early 1960s was as clean cut and proper as that of his contemporaries. Who can forget the “Endless Summer” crew showing up to the airport in jackets and ties? As time passed, Nuuhiwa’s style started shifting to the psychedelic. The change in aesthetic was also reflected in his boards. Many David Nuuhiwa surfboards produced after his run with Bing sport some pretty epic paint jobs that may or may not have benefitted from some, uh, chemical assistance. The board pictured above is a Dyno David Nuuhiwa single fin made sometime during the 1970s, which can be found on Craigslist in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. I wish the lighting were better in the pictures, but you can still see the incredible detail. The board looks like it is in very good condition, other than a few minor scrapes here and there on the rails. The seller is asking $1,200.

There’s another David Nuuhiwa single fin for sale on Craigslist, this time in southern New Jersey. You can find the second single fin here. The second single fin is simply branded as a David Nuuhiwa surfboard, in contrast to the board immediately pictured above, which is a Dyno surfboard, and has the recognizable Dyno bird laminate. There isn’t much info about Dyno online, and I’m still unclear on why some boards were produced in conjunction with Dyno, and others under the David Nuuhiwa Surfboards label. If anyone has info, let me know!

1980s David Nuuhiwa Pro Design Twin Fin (eBay)

I won’t even post a picture of the board, as it’s not nearly as cool looking as either of the examples above (though, granted, it’s up against some pretty stiff competition). More than anything else, this board is an example of the later stages of David Nuuhiwa surfboards. I assume this board was made sometime during the 1980s, given the checkerboard airbrush on the bottom and the colors in the logos. From what I can tell, collectors don’t seem to care much about the later-era David Nuuhiwa surfboards. I’ll withhold judgment until I see one in good condition.

Photo Credit

Photo at the top of the page taken by Steve Wilkings. The photo of Nuuhiwa was taken in 1967 at Nuuhiwa’s surf shop in Huntington Beach, California. I originally found this photo in a Surfer’s Journal retrospective on Wilkings’ photos, which you can find here. If you don’t already subscribe to The Surfer’s Journal, it is worth every penny and then some!

Clark Foam Ad from the 1960s: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Welcome to yet another installment of Sagas of Shred. Every Thursday we feature a different slice of surf history, and today’s entry sheds a light on one of the most accomplished businessmen the surf industry has ever seen: Gordon “Grubby” Clark, the founder and CEO of Clark Foam.

Clark Foam Promotional Photo Gordon "Grubby" Clark.jpg
Gordon “Grubby” Clark in an early Clark Foam promotional photo. Pic via Charlie Bunger’s Long Island Surfing Museum

Before its abrupt closing in 2005, Clark Foam was one of the most fearsome forces in the surfboard industry. There are endless stories about Clark’s ruthlessness. The Surfboard Project has an anecdote, via Joel Tudor, about how Donald Takayama’s first label went under after Clark Foam denied him blanks. Surfer Magazine recently ran a retrospective on the Clark Foam closing, which includes similar tales of strong-arm tactics.

In the early 1960s, though, Clark had yet to establish its dominance, and this ad, at least, makes an earnest appeal to quality and performance instead. I love the fact that just about every single big name surfboard brand at the time has their logos present: Yater, Bing, Ole, Hobie, Wardy, Hansen, and Con. Of that list, only Wardy no longer continues to produce boards (although Con is a completely different company, and Bing Copeland has ceded control to well-regarded shaper Matt Calvani.)

For a great article on the early years of Clark Foam, and how Grubby and Hobie Alter helped lay the groundwork for the modern surfboard industry, I recommend the “727 Laguna Canyon Road” feature in The Surfer’s Journal.

Hope you enjoyed this entry in Sagas of Shred, and tune in next Thursday for what comes next!

Vintage Bing Bonzer Duo

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post brings you a pair of vintage Bing Bonzer boards that are currently for sale on Craigslist. I wrote up another Bing Bonzer earlier this month — check out that post here. Without any further ado, here are the boards:

Vintage Bing Bonzer #1: 7’1″ with Diamond Tail (For Sale on Craigslist Ventura)

Pics above are via the Craigslist posting. The yellow vintage Bing Bonzer pictured above is in pretty good condition considering it’s 40+ years old. Still, you can see some obvious spots on the deck where repairs were made. The deck has some sun damage, but now we’re just nitpicking. The glass-on side bite fins are remarkably well preserved, and I just love the Bonzer logo! The last shot gives a great close-up of the concave in the tail. The seller is asking $800 for this board.

Vintage Bing Bonzer #2: Dimensions Unknown (For Sale on Craigslist Orange County)

Pics above via the Craigslist posting. Sadly, no dimensions are provided, but the board is very similar to the first vintage Bing Bonzer featured in this post. It’s nice to see a slightly different color combination, too: Board #2 has a green Bonzer logo on the side bite fins, and then a red Bing logo on the deck.

Vintage Bing Bonzer 4.jpg
Close-up shot of the tail. Pic via Craigslist.

One thing that stands out about Board #2 is the different fin. Board #1’s fin looks like it is plastic, whereas Board #2 could be fiberglass. It’s difficult for me to say without looking at each board in person. If anyone has info on the original fins that came with vintage Bing Bonzer surfboards, let me know! This board is listed at $500, which seems like a great price for a Bing Bonzer in great condition.

It’s unclear to me who shaped each of these boards. The vintage Bing Bonzer I wrote up earlier bore Mike Eaton signatures (which were not pictured in the post). Both of the Bonzers above do not have any markings that I could discern.

Finally, you can see that both boards have standard Bing logos on the decks. At some point, however, Bing produced a combination Bing Bonzer logo. I have included one below. Stoked-n-Board offers up some clues for dating the boards above, via the logo designs. According to S-n-B’s excellent Bing entry, the non-Bonzer variant of the logo was produced starting in 1970. S-n-B claims the Bing Bonzer logo,  pictured directly below, was used beginning in 1972. By that math, both vintage Bing Bonzers above were likely produced between 1970 and 1972. This is by no means definitive, but that’s the best I could come up with.

Vintage Bing Bonzer Logo
Here is a version of the Bing Bonzer logo that was reportedly used starting in 1972. Note that both boards featured above have the standard Bing logo with no reference to the Bonzer.

Check out Board #1 here, and Board #2 can be found here.