Christian Fletcher Surfboards Ad: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a modern day classic for you: a vintage Christian Fletcher Surfboards ad from 1989. Yeah, I know, it was just last week when I ran another Christian Fletcher ad as part of the Sagas of Shred series, but what can I say: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. (And actually, if you must know, both ads come from the same original source — the June 1989 issue of Surfing Magazine, Vol 25 No 6).

First, I love the simple but effective black and white motif going on. It almost reminds me of some early Volcom creative. It’s a fitting aesthetic for Christian Fletcher’s image as one of surfing’s punk antiheroes. What’s interesting to me about this Christian Fletcher Surfboards ad is it features an alternate logo. If you look closely, you’ll notice that in the logo in the lower left hand corner of the ad, you have a skeleton busting a frontside air.

However, the better known version of the Christian Fletcher logo features a skull framed by a perfect A frame peak:

Christian Fletcher Surfboards Steve Boysen Thruster 6'1 1
Here’s an example of the classic Christian Fletcher Surfboards logo, which features a skull against a wave background. The board above was shaped by Steve Boysen.

Truth be told, I like the classic version of the logo better, but I think they’re both pretty cool. I’m not sure that I’ve ever seen a board with the aerial version of the Fletcher logo, but I always have my eyes peeled. And actually, it looks like the board Fletcher is riding in the ad at the top of the page has the aerial logo, but it looks to me like it was edited in.

As always, thanks for visiting (and hopefully, even reading this far!) Next Thursday night we’ll have another vintage surf ad for even more Sagas of Shred.

Christian Fletcher Surfboards by Steve Boysen

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have one of the greatest ever surfboards from the late 1980s / early 1990s: a beautiful example of a Christian Fletcher Surfboards stick shaped by Oceanside, California shaper Steve Boysen.

The board pictured above was briefly posted on Craigslist, but the seller tells me he has since traded the board. Sorry if you had your heart set on this thing! The seller, a gentleman named Mark, emailed me these pics a few days ago but I didn’t get around to posting the photos until now. Thank you for the pics, Mark, and sorry I couldn’t get this done sooner!

As you can see in the photos above, the board boasts all the details we have come to expect from Christian Fletcher Surfboards, including the signature skull logo. The board featured here has a nice little tie dye pattern airbrush towards the rails, which I haven’t seen before.

Christian Fletcher Surfboard Steve Boysen 4

The board also features some pretty pronounced double concave in the tail, which you can clearly see in the picture above. There also some sweet two-tone glass-on fins.

Christian Fletcher Surfboard Steve Boysen 6

Boysen also signed the board near the stringer, and it’s clearly dated to 1989.

Christian Fletcher Surfboard Steve Boysen 7

Given the popularity of the Christian Fletcher Surfboards label, you would think there would be more information available about the brand online. But I have yet to find a definitive history of the label. Instead, I’m forced to make do with the occasional  Christian Fletcher Surfboards example that pops up for sale every now and then. Christian Fletcher Surfboards was advertised as its own brand; but Fletcher also rode boards that boasted both Christian Fletcher Surfboards and Town & Country Surfboards laminates. Christian Fletcher Surfboards were also produced with a number of different shapers, including Peter Benjamin, Nev Hyman, Chris McElroy and Randy Sleigh. If I had to guess, I would say the most common shaper I have seen with Christian Fletcher Surfboards is Steve Boysen, whose logo is immediately recognizable.

I think these Christian Fletcher Surfboards examples are primed to show up at auctions in future years, given that these boards have a passionate following. It’s for good reason, too: beyond the logo, which is a perfect visual encapsulation of the late 1980s and early 1990s, Fletcher will always stand out as one of the sport’s most fascinating characters.