Social Media Roundup: Autumn Advancing

Greetings, Shredderz! By now you may know the drill: keep scrolling for some of my favorite surf and vintage surfboard-related Instagram posts in recent memory.

Can you believe the venerable Channel Islands brand has been around for fifty years?! It’s a bit hard to digest. Hint hint, there might be some cool Al Merrick boards coming up on the blog soon, so stay tuned for that.

How cool is David Nuuhiwa?! Definitely way cooler than me, and probably cooler than you, too (no offense). I’ve seen lots of pics of Nuuhiwa in some truly out there get ups, and I really dig this relatively conservative look in contrast. I wish I knew more about all of Nuuhiwa’s work with different surfboard labels, which the caption briefly covers.

Bob Hurley shaped for Lightning Bolt…who knew?! This thing is gorgeous, though. 1979 single fin with an incredible color combo and Bolt logo on the deck.

Donald Takayama was a member of the storied Jacobs Surfboards surf team before he made a name for himself as a shaper. I’m mostly used to seeing pictures of Takayama from when he was older, but it’s a blast to see some photos of him from his younger days.

Dave Rastovich with an Andreini edge board! Marc Andreini is one of my favorite shapers (in fact, I have a 9′ Serena sitting next to me as I type this entry), and Rasta likely needs no introduction. There’s a great Surfer’s Journal article on some George Greenough edge boards that Rastovich surfed at Cloudbreak. Stoked to see Andreini and Rastovich continuing to explore Greenough’s designs together.

Photo at the top of the page is David Nuuhiwa. Photographer unknown; source is David Nuuhiwa Surfboards page on Facebook.

1994 Hawaiian Pro Designs Donald Takayama DT-2

Greetings, Shredderz! I’ve been seeing a lot of neat boards pop up for sale, so I decided to write up one of my recent favorites. Pictured here is a 1994 Hawaiian Pro Designs Donald Takayama DT-2 model. According to the seller, the board was ordered directly from Donald and shaped by Takayama. The DT-2 model, which is described as “Donald’s ‘all-rounder'”, continues to serve as a staple of the Surfboards by Donald Takayama lineup.

The Donald Takayama DT-2 Model featured here measures in at 9’6″ x 22 1/2″ x 3 1/16″. The board was listed for sale on Craigslist in San Diego earlier this weekend, but by the time the post went live, the listing had been taken down. All photos here are via the original listing.

This is a nice, clean example of Takayama’s DT-2 Model. I really dig the blue glass on side bites and the muted cover palette. The board has all the lamiantes you’d expect from a mid-Nineties Hawaiian Pro Designs Donald Takayama stick: the script down the rails, the oval logo on the bottom, and the signature bird design.

According to the seller, there were some dings that were professionally repaired, but I can’t tell where these are. Overall, the board looks to be in very good shape.

The DT-2 model pictured in this post has an interesting signature on the stringer. It’s extremely hard to make out, and I did my best to tweak the pic a bit to bring out the text. According to the listing, the line above the stringer reads “From Dad, September 4th 1994”, and the line below lists the serial number (which is illegible) and the dimensions. The vast majority of Donald Takayama boards from this era have clear signatures on the stringer, like this example. However, the DT-2 does not. The handwriting looks very similar to Donald’s, based on the other boards I have seen. I also think it’s extremely unlikely the seller whipped up a crazy story to lie about the provenance of the board. Moreover, all the details on the board support the seller’s explanation that it was hand shaped in 1994, from the era-specific logos to the custom inscription on the stringer. I feel very confident in saying this is a Donald Takayama hand shape, and I thought the unusual inscription was worth a closer look for those who like to geek out on small details.

The seller listed the board for $745. I think this was a great price, and I’m not surprised to see that the listing was quickly taken down. I’m no fortune teller, but given Takayama’s incredible career, I wouldn’t be surprised to see his hand shaped boards continue to rise in value.

Weekend Grab Bag: All Mixed Up

Greetings, Shredderz! This Sunday we’ve got a smattering of sledz for your perusing pleasure, as part of our Weekend Grab Bag series. It’s been a while since we last ran one of these entries. The last time around we featured some cool Donald Takayama surfboards. The rules for the Weekend Grab Bag are simple: scroll below for some photos of surfboards that are currently listed for sale online, along with links to the sale listings and some commentary. Without any further ado, let’s take a peek at the goods!

Steve Coletta / Natural Curves Single Fin (Craigslist Orange County)

This is a gorgeous vintage board shaped by Steve Coletta of Natural Curves Surfboards. Coletta is a longtime Santa Cruz shaper. As someone who occasionally samples the right hand points of Santa Cruz, I have a fondness for vintage boards from the area: here’s a stunning Rick Noe / Steamer Lane Surfboards single fin, and I’ve always got my eye peeled for any Chuck Vinson shapes. Anyway, the Steve Coletta stick pictured above is 7’7″ of single fin goodness with some killer details. Check out the technicolor tail block and the gorgeous glass on wooden fin. The seller is asking $380. I think this is an attractive price, but as always, that’s up to the market and not me. [EDIT: I had originally described the board as a Seventies single fin; according to the original listing it was shaped in 1981.]

Shaun Tomson Model Single Fin (Craigslist San Luis Obispo)

This Shaun Tomson Model can be found tucked away on California’s Central Coast. The board isn’t in spectacular condition, and I think it might be a tad pricey considering the condition (asking price is $300), but I really dig this thing. Tomson, of course, is one of the greatest surfers of the Seventies, if not all time, and I love the swooping airbrush. This board has a nice glass on fin, too.

Donald Takayama 2+1 Eighties Thruster (eBay / Huntington Beach)

Here at Shred Sledz we’ve featured a ton of Donald Takayama’s boards. Unsurprisingly, most are longboards, with some other templates mixed in here and there. However, you don’t really see a ton of straight up Takayama thrusters out there. This board has some clear Eighties influence with the wide point pushed pretty far back, and the short-lived 2+1 fin setup. I’m curious about where the price will end up. The board is $147.50 as of the time of this blog post, with three and a half days still left in the auction.

Weekend Grab Bag: Jacobs Donald Takayama Model Edition

Greetings, Shredderz! Today is a special edition of the Weekend Grab Bag, a series that spotlights notable vintage boards currently listed for sale. This Sunday we have not one but two examples of the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model that are currently up for grabs.

I wrote an earlier post on the Jacobs Donald Takayama Hawaii Model, which you can find here. I have also written up the Bing Donald Takayama Model. While my memory of Donald Takayama is as an elder statesman of surfing, largely thanks to his work with Joel Tudor, during the Sixties Takayama was already a talented pro. It was in this decade that Bing and Jacobs both produced Takayama signature models, both of which are traditional longboards. According to the Encyclopedia of Surfing, the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model was produced beginning in 1965. The following year, Donald jumped ship to Bing, where he designed the David Nuuhiwa Noserider.

A lot of the content on Shred Sledz veers towards the Seventies and Eighties. Nonetheless I think there’s a timeless aspect to the beautiful longboards shaped in the Sixties before the Transition Era. And given Takayama’s long career, whether it was as a pro in his teens, or the functional noseriders he shaped up until his passing, I think there’s something special about Takayama’s longboards.

9’8″ Jacobs Donald Takayama Model (Facebook — Oahu)

The first board is an all-original 9’8″ Jacobs Donald Takayama Model. Pics are via the Vintage Surfboard Collectors group on Facebook, and are reprinted here with the permission of the board’s owner. This board is for sale, so please check out the post and DM the seller if you’re interested. Thanks Dave for allowing me to run your pics.

Jacobs Donald Takayama Model Deck.jpg

According to the listing, the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model is all original, without any delam or twists or any other major issues. You can see that it has some snackles and repairs from over the years, but overall, it’s in good shape for a surfboard that pre-dates the Moon Landing. The seller is asking $1,800 and the board is located on Oahu, so keep that in mind for any potential shipping costs.

Jacobs Donald Takayama Model FinJacobs Donald Takayama Model Rocker

Nothing makes me happier than seeing a board listed for sale with great pics accompanying it, and the seller definitely delivered in this regard. Check out the photos above for some more shots of the beautiful (and original) red fin.

9’7″ Jacobs Donald Takayama Model (Craigslist — LA)

The second Jacobs Donald Takayama Model is up for sale on Craigslist in Los Angeles. You can click the photos above to enlarge. As you can see, the board is very similar to the first one I posted, although it has green colored panels towards the rails.

You can click the photos above to enlarge. The green Jacobs Donald Takayama Model is in worse shape than the earlier board. The green version has some water damage towards the nose, which is clearly depicted in the photos. Here’s another shout out to the seller for providing some great and informative pics of the surfboard. You’ll notice the matching red fins on both boards. I can’t quite tell if the fin silhouette is the exact same.

The Craigslist LA Takayama board is being listed for $550. This is a good deal cheaper than the other board, a good chunk of the price difference can be chalked up to the significant difference in condition. I don’t have any recent price comparisons for the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model, so make of these prices what you will.

Dave, the seller of the board at the top of the page, helpfully included some old ads and descriptions of the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model. Make sure you click the photos below to enlarge them.

According to the ad, Takayama apparently shaped many of his Jacobs signature models himself. This is cool no matter what, but it’s even more impressive when you consider that in 1965, when the board was introduced, Takayama was only twenty two! The photo above and to the right also goes into detail about the actual shape of the Jacobs Donald Takayama model:

Designer: Donald Takayama — 1965 — for waves up to 15′ in height. Cost: 9’6″ $155.00. Leading Rider: Donald Takayama / Denny Tompkins. Design Theory: This board has a speed shape for the fast beach break and point waves. Thin rails are used for edge control and going through white water. Also, loss of speed will not occur while going under sections of waves. The nose is shaped and very thin with a little round belly in the bottom for maneuvering while riding on the tip of the nose. The tail is also quite thin and six inches in width. The roundness is also used on the bottom in the tail to provide a faster and smoother turn without spinning out in a critical wave. A conservative amount of rocker is put in the board with a small lift or kick in the nose. This enables the board to perform to the fullest extent for this type of shape.

These are two beautiful vintage surfboards, and if you know more about the Jacobs Donald Takayama Model, or you have one to share, feel free to drop me a line!

Photo at the top of the page by LeRoy Grannis; via the Encyclopedia of Surfing

Shaper Spotlight: Surfboards by Todd Pinder

Greetings, Shredderz! I’d like to welcome all of you to a brand spanking new series on the blog, titled “Shaper Spotlight.” Up until now, this humble blog has focused mostly on vintage surfboards. I think it’s also important to profile contemporary shapers who are building boards today. There’s a ton of rich history found in older surfboards, and that will always be a big part of Shred Sledz. That said, there’s only one way to ensure hand shaped surfboards continue to get their due, and that’s by supporting the talented craftsmen who build them.

Last month I took my first ever trip to Oahu, and during that time I was lucky enough to meet up with Todd Pinder, the man behind Surfboards by Todd Pinder. Pinder plies his trade in Honolulu, where he painstakingly crafts each and every board by hand. This doesn’t just apply to shaping, however — Pinder is one of those rare shapers who also glasses all of his own creations, too.

Todd Pinder 1
Todd Pinder creates all his boards by hand, shaping and glassing his creations. Here are a few boards waiting to be finished. Love the bold but simple red color.

Pinder might be a modern surfboard builder, but he draws upon some very deep roots from years of living in Hawaii and working alongside some well respected folks, like Carl Schaper (pronounced Shopper) and Donald Takayama. Pinder also continues to provide boards for folks like Joel Tudor and his sons.

Pinder’s shop is filled with a bunch of rad vintage sticks. See below for a neat Seventies Greg Liddle single fin. I can’t recall off the top of my head whether it was a hull, but I really dig the unusual pattern on the deck. Click the photos below to enlarge.

I got to see the Bing David Nuuhiwa Noseriding model that Joel Tudor posted about below. Todd told me the Nuuhiwa is a little shorter than other stock DN Noseriding models from the same time period.

The single coolest board Pinder showed me was an insane Joe Quigg paddleboard. Make sure you click the photos below to enlarge, as they show off the paddleboard in a bit more detail. Check out the squared off tail. The Joe Quigg paddleboard has incredibly thick rails, and I think it’s about 12′ long, so there’s plenty of paddle power to spare. You can see Pinder posing alongside this board in the post at the top of the page.

Here are some earlier photos, via Pinder’s Facebook page, that show Joe Quigg alongside Todd and the paddleboard.

That’s not all Pinder had stashed away, however. Upstairs in his shaping room Pinder also had a Seventies Surf Line Hawaii single fin shaped by Buddy Dumphy and a Gordon & Smith Skip Frye from the late Sixties. Click the photos below to enlarge. I couldn’t quite figure out which model the G&S / Skip Frye board is — maybe a “Speed Board”? — but it’s interesting that it has a small text G&S logo, instead of the classic bow tie logo that we all know and love. Pinder tells me the outline on the G&S / Skip Frye board has inspired some of his own egg shapes.

If you’re still not satisfied, well, there’s more. Pinder also showed off a sick Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel. The Sopwith Camel is one of Tom Morey’s many quirky and incredible Transition Era shapes, featuring an early stringerless design. I could go on a rant about how Tom Morey might be the most underrated inventor in surfing history, but I’ll save that for another time.

Todd Pinder Morey Pope Sopwith Camel.jpg
Pinder with a very cool Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel.

And while Pinder’s shaping room is filled with vintage gems, I’m even more stoked about his current creations. I mentioned it earlier, but it’s worth repeating: Pinder shapes and glasses all of his boards. Yes, all of them. Surfboards are often marketed as bespoke goods, but the manufacturing reality can be the opposite. When you order a surfboard from Pinder, you know it was built by one set of very capable hands from start to finish. If you even have the slightest appreciation for craftsmanship, that should resonate with you. As a bonus, Todd is a very friendly and surf stoked individual.

Todd Pinder Surfboards.jpg
Pinder posing alongside some of his newer creations. Pic via Surfboards by Todd Pinder Facebook Page

If you’re in the market for a beautiful new board, hit up Surfboards by Todd Pinder and tell him we sent you! You can also follow him on Instagram here and on Facebook here. Thanks Todd for inviting me to your studio and for sharing the story behind some killer surfboards!

Weekend Grab Bag: Sunset Surfboards & More

Greetings, Shredderz! Hope you all had truly wonderful weekends. There was some late season swell up here in Northern California, which was an unexpected and pleasant surprise. Yours truly was also active on the pickups front, but that’s a post for another time. As always, the Weekend Grab Bag features a collection of boards that, as of the time the post goes live, are listed for sale online. Today we’ve got a Sunset Surfboards single fin, a cool Eaton Bonzer, and more.

7’2″ Seventies Sunset Surfboards Single Fin (Craigslist Ventura)

Click on the photos above to enlarge. This stick must have migrated up the California coast, given that Sunset Surfboards was based in San Diego, and it’s currently now in the Ventura area. Sunset Surfboards still gets a lot of love from some notable San Diego locals, including folks like Joel Tudor and Surfy Surfy. Not sure who shaped the board, although Sunset Surfboards was once home to Bill Shrosbree, whom I think is retired. This single fin looks like it’s in pretty good condition, and as a bonus, it comes with a really great original fin. The seller is asking $300, which I think is a really nice price when you factor in the fin.

7’6″ Eaton Bonzer Shaped by Ace (eBay San Diego)

Click the photos above to enlarge. I’ve professed my love for the Eaton Bonzer surfboard many, many times before, and the example you see above is a neat one. It’s worth noting the board was not shaped by Mike Eaton but by Albert “ACE” Elliott. ACE shaped a good number of these Eaton Bonzers, and it looks like he’s still going strong today. I also dig the original fin.

6’4″ Eighties Donald Takayama Twin Fin (Craigslist Hawaii)

Shout out to Milo for sending this one my way! First, I’m not so sure this board is actually still for sale, given that the Craigslist post is all the way from February. The seller claims the Donald Takayama twin fin you see above was shaped in the Eighties. Not much other info is listed. Personally, I don’t come across many Takayama boards from this era. Most of what I see on Craiglist and eBay here in California are boards that look to be from the 2000s or so. The Takayama twin fin isn’t cheap — the seller is asking $750 — but the board looks to be in great shape, and I love the old school “banner” logo, the resin pinlines, and of course, the timeless outline and fin setup.

 

Weekend Grab Bag: Donald Takayama Scorpion & More

Greetings, Shredderz! By now you should know the drill: it’s the latest edition of the Weekend Grab Bag, where I spotlight some great boards I have seen listed for sale. As always, all of the postings are live as of the time the blog post was published. Onto the fresh batch of vintage sticks, beginning with a Donald Takayama Scorpion in clean condition.

Donald Takayama Scorpion (Craigslist San Diego)

Donald Takayama Scorpion.jpg

The Donald Takayama Scorpion just might be one of the most famous models from Takayama’s long and distinguished shaping career. The vast majority of Takayama Scorpions I have seen are the epoxy versions, which were obviously not hand shaped by DT. (For what it’s worth, I borrowed a friend’s epoxy Donald Takayama egg once and absolutely loved it.) The Scorpion featured above is 7’4″ x 22″ x 2 7/8″ and the seller is asking $800. Takayama himself signed the board in pencil on the stringer. I have also heard that some of these later-era DT boards were shaped with the assistance of a shaping machine. I would guess this board is late 90s to early 2000s, given the FCS fin boxes for the side bites. Either way I think this is a nice price for a very cool board.

Vintage Skip Frye Fish (Craigslist San Diego)

Vintage Skip Frye Fish 6'6" .jpg

The seller claims this vintage Skip Frye fish hasn’t been surfed in at least twenty years. As for an exact date, I’m hard pressed to tell you anything. I want to say most Skip Frye fish I see have wooden Gephart keels, but this example has fiberglass ones. Here’s what the seller has to say about the fins: “This board has great fins a modified Keel fin template by JB that is less deep then (sic) a normal keel and rides more loose in the water.” I don’t know who JB is, but I dig the vintage-ish date of the board. It’s 6’6″ long and looks super fun, and the posting has some great pics of the owner surfing it, too. Seller is asking $2,500, which is not cheap, but I have yet to see a bargain on a Skip Frye shape.

90s Hobie Phil Edwards Longboard (Craigslist Orange County)

You can click on any of the photos above to enlarge. I have written up the Hobie Phil Edwards Model a few times, and it remains one of the most classic nose riders ever made. The board you see above was shaped by Phil Edwards, but it’s not a Hobie Phil Edwards Model. For starters, the seller claims the board was shaped in 1995. It also has some interesting details that make it very different from the classic 60s Hobie Phil Edwards Model, such as a triple stringer setup, a wider center stringer, and a different logo. At some point during the 80s or 90s, Hobie also reissued the Phil Edwards Model (with the help of Stewart Surfboards, I believe), that had an imitation foil logo on it, as well as a different outline from the board you see above. So then what exactly is the board above? I’m not sure — it may have even been a custom. The seller refers to it as a Classic Model, but I have never seen that mentioned anywhere. As always, if you have any clues, let me know!

Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker (Craigslist Los Angeles)

Last but not least we have another creation from the mind of Tom Morey, who remains one of surfing’s foremost mad scientists. One of the coolest features found in the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker model is the psychedelic graphic design of the Slipcheck patterns. The McTavish Tracker was designed by Australian shaper Bob McTavish, and it remains one of the standout shapes of the Transition Era. According to surfresearch.com.au, the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker was created during a trip McTavish took to visit George Greenough in Santa Barbara, and the rest is history. I actually wrote up an earlier Morey Pope McTavish Tracker here. The earlier post features another example of the board and links to some resources with some history behind the groundbreaking shape.

Weekend Grab Bag: Tri Plane Hull Twin Fin & More

Greetings, Shredderz! The weekend is almost over, and right before the buzzer we’ve got another installment of the Weekend Grab Bag. Keep reading for a selection of cool vintage surfboards that are listed for sale online.

Channel Islands Al Merrick Tri Plane Hull Twin Fin (eBay)

I absolutely love vintage Channel Islands surfboards. Considering it’s probably the most famous modern surfboard label of all time, I’d expect to see more vintage CI sticks pop up. As you can see the board was shaped by Al Merrick himself — see here for an earlier blog post I wrote on the subject of Merrick hand shapes. The CI Tri Plane Hull twin fin measures in at 5’10” x 20 1/2″ x 2 5/8″. I think the board is way overpriced considering the condition — click through to the link to see close ups of the damage — but it’s still a cool stick.

Donald Takayama Flo Egg Thruster (Craigslist San Diego)

I’m tempted to snap up this one myself! Here’s a lovely 7’2″ Donald Takayama Flo Egg with a thruster setup. I can see this board being a versatile and fun every day rider. The seller is asking $700 for the board. You can clearly see that Takayama signed the board in pencil on the stringer. The newer Takayama boards that are produced nowadays have an image of Donald’s signature, indicating that this one was shaped by the man himself, though it’s unclear to me whether or not he used shaping machines for his later boards. Either way, for $700 I think this is very nicely priced.

Local Motion Pat Rawson Thruster with Pottz Airbrush (eBay)

I absolutely love this board, which was shaped by Hawaiian master Pat Rawson for the Local Motion label. The airbrush on the vintage surfboard you see above is an unmistakable tribute to Martin Potter’s iconic artwork. Sadly, as much as I love the board — and the colors and Rawson’s pedigree are unimpeachable — it’s priced in the stratosphere. I love the different colored glass on fins, too.

Thanks for checking out the Weekend Grab Bag and tune in for some more goodies later this week!

Donald Takayama Surfing’s New Image Surfboard for Dru Harrison

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’re taking a quick look at a board that recently caught my eye. Pictured here is a Surfing’s New Image surfboard shaped by Donald Takayama. The board was originally listed for sale on eBay, and all pics in this post are via the eBay listing. You can find the original listing here. I’ve long had a bit of a fascination with the SNI brand, whether it’s the Aipa stings that were produced under the label (although most SNI / Aipa stings were not shaped by Ben Aipa), or some of Rick Hamon’s later designs. If I had to choose, though, I’m probably most fond of the SNI boards that were shaped by Donald Takayama. Takayama, of course, was a surfing fixture for decades, whether it was as a Velzy / Jacobs team rider during the sport’s earliest days, or his collaborations with Joel Tudor starting in the Nineties. The Surfing’s New Image surfboard pictured here is an unusual one. First, I would say that you don’t see a ton of Takayama / SNI boards in general, but this one is the only example I have seen that has a Dru Harrison laminate on it.

Surfing's New Image Surfboard Donald Takayama Dru Harrison 4.jpg

According the listing, the board measures in at 7’0″ x 19 1/2″ x 3″. The board was almost certainly shaped sometime during the Seventies, though I’m not sure what year. Dru Harrison’s best known surfboard is the Improvisor model he produced under the Rick Surfboards label during the Sixties. Here’s an example of a Rick Surfboards Dru Harrison Improvisor that recently sold on eBay as well.

The SNI board sold for about $150. Even though the board would require a decent amount of repairs, I still think this is a pretty good price. After all, this is a Donald Takayama we’re talking about! From what I have seen, the SNI / Takayama boards can be had at fairly decent prices. Here’s another example of a Seventies SNI / Takayama stick that sold for $575, which I thought was a nice price from the buyer’s perspective.

Sadly, I can’t find any information on Takayama and Harrison’s relationship. I’m guessing they must have crossed paths in the South Bay in the Sixties. During this time Harrison was riding for Rick Surfboards, and Takayama was designing boards for both Bing Surfboards and then Weber. Considering the high profile of both men involved in making this board, you’d think there would be a little more information available.

You can check out the original eBay listing for the Surfing’s New Image surfboard designed by Dru Harrison and Donald Takayama here.

 

Jacobs Surfboards Donald Takayama Hawaii Model

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post comes to your courtesy of a reader who was kind enough to reach out with some great pics of a very unusual board: the Jacobs Surfboards Donald Takayama Hawaii Model. A few days ago I posted a Jacobs Donald Takayama Hawaii Model on Instagram, saying I had only seen one example of this board before. It wasn’t long before a gentleman named Marty sent me some photos of a different Takayama Hawaii Model he owns.

First, I’ll re-post the images that I shared on Instagram. I got these photos from the listing for an old auction, which you can find here. Note that Jacobs Surfboards had a separate Donald Takayama Model longboard. You can see an example of one here. The Jacobs Donald Takayama Hawaii Model, on the other hand, has a different laminate with the word “Hawaii” prominently featured in the center, as you can see above and in the photos below.

Click on any of the photos above to enlarge. According to the auction listing, the Takayama Hawaii Model was shaped in 1968 and it measures in at 8’6″.

The photos above are of Marty’s Jacobs Surfboards Donald Takayama Hawaii Model. As you can see, his photos provide some great context on the design elements of this rad surfboard. You can really see the extra foam in the tail as part of what looks like an S Deck, which isn’t really visible from the pics of the auction board. Overall, Marty’s photos really help shine a light on what I would almost call the more hull-like properties of the board. The fin looks identical to the one on the auction board, except it’s yellow on Marty’s stick.

The other thing that’s interesting to me is Marty’s board has a slightly different logo. It’s hard to tell, but if you look at the pics from the Jacobs Donald Takayama Hawaii Model sold at auction, the logo is in black and white. As you can see directly above, though, Marty’s Takayama Hawaii Model has some red in the logo. Otherwise the boards look extremely similar.

Thanks again to Marty for sharing these pics! If you have any super rare boards you’d like to share, don’t hesitate to reach out.