Surfer Magazine’s “Handmade 2”

Greetings, Shredderz! We don’t have that much for you, just a tip to check out a great new video from Surfer Magazine. I’m proud to say I just re-upped my subscription to the Bible of the Sport. As long as Surfer is putting out content, I’m there with some hard-earned cash — especially when it’s this good!

“Handemade 2” is the follow up to, you guessed it, “Handmade”, which I covered earlier this year. “Handmade 2” features a stacked lineup of surfer / shapers piloting some of their creations through some dreamy waves: Alex Knost, on some Campbell Brothers-inspired Bonzers; Andrew Doheny, of Slobcraft; Shyama Buttonshaw, an Aussie ripper based out of Bells Beach; and Ellis Ericson, whose recent experiments with Greenough-style edge boards were documented in the excellent “On the Edge of a Dream” project.

Anyway, enough from me: you can watch “Handmade 2” in its entirety below.

Photo at the top of the page features Alex Knost and it originally appeared on the YouTube link you see above.

George Greenough Design Edge Board Shaped by Bob Duncan

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ve got a real doozy for you. Featured here is an absolutely insane George Greenough Design edge board shaped by Bob Duncan of Wilderness Surfboards. All of the photos come courtesy of a fellow Shredder in New Jersey who would like to remain anonymous. He stumbled across this board while on an adventure in California, and was kind enough to share the photos you see here.

The George Greenough Design edge board featured here is actually a sail board. In the photo of the deck you can see a slot for a sail, as well as where the foot straps would have been placed. The George Greenough Design edge board was shaped by Bob Duncan in either the late Eighties or early Nineties. It was apparently made for large swells at Razor Blades, a spot within the famed Hollister Ranch.

The edge board comes from the fertile mind of George Greenough, the legendary and reclusive design genius who helped usher in the shortboard revolution, and is still influencing surfboard design today. Recently Greenough’s edge board has undergone a revival of sorts thanks to a lineup of well-regarded shapers, including folks like Marc Andreini, Kirk Putnam, Scott Anderson and Manny Caro. Andrew Kidman and Ellis Ericson recently released a film / book project called “On the Edge of a Dream”. Kidman and Ericson’s project documents their explorations of Greenough’s edge board design, which were produced in collaboration with Greenough himself.

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Ellis Ericson puts his own spin on George Greenough’s edge board design and makes it look good. Photo via Surfing World; photo by Woody Gooch

What makes the Bob Duncan / George Greenough Design sail board interesting is the fact it was shaped well before the current edge board craze. The best summary of the history of Greenough’s edge board can be found in Marc Andreini’s excellent book “The Gift.” The relevant chapter on the Greenough edge board was excerpted in Liquid Salt. Greenough invented the edge board in the Sixties, and by the Seventies, surfboard shapers had shifted their attention elsewhere. Greenough began windsurfing in the early Eighties, and during this process he rediscovered the benefits of the edge board design. One of Greenough’s famous sail boards was a 7’3″ shape he dubbed “The Backyard Special”, which was profiled in The Surfer’s Journal. The Backyard Special was an edge board that helped prove the benefits Greenough had initially envisioned about the design.

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George Greenough’s magic board, AKA The Backyard Special. This is a sail board that incorporates a number of Greenough design elements, from the spoon-like deck to an edge board on the bottom. It also includes a power blade fin, which is not pictured here. Photo via The Surfer’s Journal

The way Greenough tells it, the Backyard Special was a magic board. In 2014, when Greenough decided to shape some surfboards for Dave Rastovich following a multi-decade hiatus, he drew on the edge board concepts from the Backyard Special. The end result were two edge boards, one of which Rasta surfed at decent sized Cloudbreak.

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Dave Rastovich putting a 6’3″ George Greenough edge board through its paces at Cloudbreak. Greenough shaped two boards for Rasta’s trip to Fiji: the 6’3″ pictured here, and an 8’8″ that Rasta did not get to surf after injuring his knee. These two boards represented the first stand up surfboards Greenough had shaped in years. Photo via The Surfer’s Journal / Liquid Salt; photograph by Nick Liotta

Rasta’s Fiji trip was also chronicled in the Surfer’s Journal. You can find the original article here, which was originally published in 2014 (and if you don’t already subscribe, you really should.) Rastovich, in turn, mentioned the Greenough edge boards to Ellis Ericson during a trip to the Maldives. Ericson and Kidman then collaborated with Greenough to produce updated versions of some of his famous designs, and documented the entire process for “On the Edge of a Dream.”

Back in California, it appears that Bob Duncan had been shaping interpretations of the George Greenough Design edge board concept since the late eighties and early nineties, right when Greenough was pushing the limits on his Backyard Special. Perhaps Duncan was in touch with Greenough at this time, or word of Greenough’s edge board designs had gotten back to Duncan somehow. It’s not clear to me how Duncan initially picked up the edge board concept. That said, Wilderness Surfboards, the label under which Bob Duncan shapes, was actually founded by George Greenough and Michael Cundith. However, it appears Greenough hasn’t been involved with the label (either its Santa Barbara or New South Wales variants) for a while now.

In addition to the George Greenough Design sail board featured here, you can find plentiful evidence of other edge boards shaped by Bob Duncan. See below for a photo of an edge board gun with a thruster setup that was shaped in 1993.

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Photo of a Bob Duncan-shaped Wilderness Surfboards gun that incorporates Greenough’s edge board concept. I can’t be sure but the edge looks different than the more dramatic version on the board Rasta is surfing at Cloudbreak further up in the post. Photo via Swaylocks

Kirk Putnam also published a photo of a Bob Duncan edge board on his blog back in 2011, a few years before Greenough shaped his boards for Dave Rastovich. You can see the photo below:

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On the left is an old Wilderness Surfboards hull shaped by Richie West. On the right is a Bob Duncan / Wilderness Greenough edge board. You can also see what looks like a variant of Greenough’s power blade fin. Photo via KP’s Round Up

Finally, I couldn’t help but notice the logo on the Bob Duncan edge board. The deck has the classic George Greenough Design airplane logo. What’s interesting is the logo on the bottom of the board, which appears to be a variant of the airplane logo. I’m not sure the story behind this version of the George Greenough Design airplane logo, so if you have info, let me know.

Thanks again to the mystery Shredder in New Jersey who shared these photos of the Bob Duncan / George Greenough Design edge board. It’s a fascinating window into a design that has roots both in California and Australia, spanning across decades of surfing history, involving a number of talented surfers and craftsmen.

On the Edge of a Dream

Today we’d like to alert you fine folks to a very cool project that is under way: a film and book combination called “On the Edge of a Dream.” “On the Edge” is a collaboration between Andrew Kidman and Ellis Ericson, alongside the legendary George Greenough. The project is made up of a short film and an accompanying book, both of which are available exclusively through the website. “On the Edge” is an exploration of George Greenough’s edge board design, which has seen a resurgence recently due to shapers like Marc Andreini and Scott Anderson, as well as a crew of alternative surf craft enthusiasts such as Kirk Putnam and Dave Rastovich. Oh, and in case not enough bold faced names have been thrown at you, Barry McGee designed the artwork.

The Surfer’s Journal ran a great piece a few years ago that featured Dave Rastovich taking two other Greenough edge boards through their paces at Cloudbreak. The two boards featured in the Rastovich / TSJ article look extremely similar to the one Ericson can be seen surfing in the trailer for “On the Edge of a Dream.”

If you’d like to see the film in person, “On the Edge of a Dream” will be doing a series of premiers up and down the California coast. See the Instagram post below (and give the official account a follow) for more info on this rad undertaking: