Hobie Phil Edwards Model #463

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ve got a prime example of one of the greatest surfboards ever made: the original Hobie Phil Edwards Model. It is a board I have written up before, and it’s a board that I intend to write about for as long as I keep coming across new examples. It’s also worth noting that it was Edwards’ birthday just a few days ago. One of the coolest things about the Hobie Phil Edwards Model is the fact that every single board from the original run was numbered. Here we have #463, stamped into the board’s unmistakable and beautiful foil logo. This board comes courtesy of Shred Sledz reader Aaron. Many thanks to Aaron for sharing photos of this incredible stick.

Click the photos above to enlarge. The story behind the board is pretty amazing as well. Aaron’s father was working on a house in San Diego about thirty years ago and he found the board stashed in the rafters. Later on, Aaron was working in Donald Takayama’s factory, where he fixed up the board to the state you see it in today. I am very stoked to report that Aaron continues to ride this board today! (Note: sadly, I myself am guilty of being way too precious about not riding some of the boards I own…I’ll have to address that pretty soon.)

One of my favorite features about the Hobie Phil Edwards Model is the gorgeous fin. As you can see, Aaron’s board has the classic maple reverse D fin, and it is gorgeous. Aaron’s Hobie Phil Edwards Model measures in at 9’10”. The owner estimates it weighs about 50 pounds or so, which is no joke!

Thanks again to Aaron for sharing the photos you see in this post. I absolutely love the Hobie Phil Edwards Model, in case that wasn’t already clear. To me, the board seems to be something of an expression of everything I know of Edwards’ reputation: timeless, classic style that will never get old.

Weekend Grab Bag: Rick Surfboards UFO Stubby & More

Greetings, Shredderz! Yes, I’m aware that it is no longer the weekend. I’m not going to let something as trivial as reality get in the way of delivering another dose of some vintage surfboard goodness, however. Keep reading for a selection of boards that are currently listed for sale, including a neat Rick Surfboards UFO Stubby model. More sledz below…

Rick Surfboards UFO Stubby (eBay)

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Long time readers of the blog may know that I really, really love Rick Surfboards. See here for a Deep Dive I wrote on the label; and here’s another article on the Rick Surfboards Barry Kanaiaupuni Model. The Rick Surfboards UFO Stubby model pictured above needs work, but I still want to highlight what is a pretty unusual Transition Era shape from the label. It comes with what looks to be an original fin, and I dig the matching red high density foam wedge stringer.

Seventies Gordon & Smith Waterskate (Craigslist Los Angeles)

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I was really stoked to find a Gordon & Smith Waterskate for sale. First, the board was designed by Tom Morey, who is one of the greatest inventors in the history of surfing. I actually learned about the origins of the G&S Waterskate a few weeks ago, when I visited Marc Andreini in his shaping room and showed him an old board of his. The vintage Andreini you see below was actually inspired by the Gordon & Smith Waterskate, particularly with its concave deck. The pics of the Waterskate from the Craigslist post don’t show off the deck very well, but it was cool to run into an example of this board so soon after learning about its origins.

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Here’s a photo of Marc Andreini with a single fin he shaped in either 1970 or 1971. The board has an unusual concave deck along with some pretty boxy down rails. According to Marc, this is actually a take on a Tom Morey design, which was also produced as the Gordon & Smith Waterskate. I forget the exact mechanics but apparently the design principles create a similar effect to Marc’s current Greenough-inspired edge boards. Marc tells me he shaped similar boards for Santa Barbara surfers who were exploring El Salvador’s right hand point breaks during that era. If you look closely at the board you’ll notice it has the original Andreini Surfboards logo, which I think is such a cool touch. And if you look even closer, you’ll notice a Clark Foam blank in the background, too 🤫🤭😶. Anyway it was great to show Marc the board and get the history behind the shape. For all the time I spend looking at boards on Craigslist, nothing beats the experience of talking to and learning from a knowledgeable shaper in person! #marcandreini #andreinisurfboards

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Hobie Terry Martin Speed Dialer (Craigslist Orange County)

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The board you see above isn’t really vintage, per se, but it still represents a cool collaboration between a few well regarded shapers. Rich Pavel is known for his fish designs, and one of his most recognizable models is the Quan or the Speed Dialer, which is a quad fin fish. Terry Martin was an early mentor to Pavel, and according to the Craigslist ad, after seeing the Speed Dialer, Martin decided to whip up one of his own. The board is priced at an exceedingly reasonable $375.

Fully Restored Dick Brewer Seventies Single Fin (Craigslist Orange County)

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I absolutely love Dick Brewer Seventies Single Fin surfboards, and this one is no exception. One caveat: the board has been fully restored, hence the flawless exterior. What I love about this board, other than the classic outline, is the unusual Brewer Boards logo. I can’t say whether or not it was shaped by Brewer himself, but there’s no denying that it looks stunning.

Weekend Grab Bag: Donald Takayama Scorpion & More

Greetings, Shredderz! By now you should know the drill: it’s the latest edition of the Weekend Grab Bag, where I spotlight some great boards I have seen listed for sale. As always, all of the postings are live as of the time the blog post was published. Onto the fresh batch of vintage sticks, beginning with a Donald Takayama Scorpion in clean condition.

Donald Takayama Scorpion (Craigslist San Diego)

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The Donald Takayama Scorpion just might be one of the most famous models from Takayama’s long and distinguished shaping career. The vast majority of Takayama Scorpions I have seen are the epoxy versions, which were obviously not hand shaped by DT. (For what it’s worth, I borrowed a friend’s epoxy Donald Takayama egg once and absolutely loved it.) The Scorpion featured above is 7’4″ x 22″ x 2 7/8″ and the seller is asking $800. Takayama himself signed the board in pencil on the stringer. I have also heard that some of these later-era DT boards were shaped with the assistance of a shaping machine. I would guess this board is late 90s to early 2000s, given the FCS fin boxes for the side bites. Either way I think this is a nice price for a very cool board.

Vintage Skip Frye Fish (Craigslist San Diego)

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The seller claims this vintage Skip Frye fish hasn’t been surfed in at least twenty years. As for an exact date, I’m hard pressed to tell you anything. I want to say most Skip Frye fish I see have wooden Gephart keels, but this example has fiberglass ones. Here’s what the seller has to say about the fins: “This board has great fins a modified Keel fin template by JB that is less deep then (sic) a normal keel and rides more loose in the water.” I don’t know who JB is, but I dig the vintage-ish date of the board. It’s 6’6″ long and looks super fun, and the posting has some great pics of the owner surfing it, too. Seller is asking $2,500, which is not cheap, but I have yet to see a bargain on a Skip Frye shape.

90s Hobie Phil Edwards Longboard (Craigslist Orange County)

You can click on any of the photos above to enlarge. I have written up the Hobie Phil Edwards Model a few times, and it remains one of the most classic nose riders ever made. The board you see above was shaped by Phil Edwards, but it’s not a Hobie Phil Edwards Model. For starters, the seller claims the board was shaped in 1995. It also has some interesting details that make it very different from the classic 60s Hobie Phil Edwards Model, such as a triple stringer setup, a wider center stringer, and a different logo. At some point during the 80s or 90s, Hobie also reissued the Phil Edwards Model (with the help of Stewart Surfboards, I believe), that had an imitation foil logo on it, as well as a different outline from the board you see above. So then what exactly is the board above? I’m not sure — it may have even been a custom. The seller refers to it as a Classic Model, but I have never seen that mentioned anywhere. As always, if you have any clues, let me know!

Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker (Craigslist Los Angeles)

Last but not least we have another creation from the mind of Tom Morey, who remains one of surfing’s foremost mad scientists. One of the coolest features found in the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker model is the psychedelic graphic design of the Slipcheck patterns. The McTavish Tracker was designed by Australian shaper Bob McTavish, and it remains one of the standout shapes of the Transition Era. According to surfresearch.com.au, the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker was created during a trip McTavish took to visit George Greenough in Santa Barbara, and the rest is history. I actually wrote up an earlier Morey Pope McTavish Tracker here. The earlier post features another example of the board and links to some resources with some history behind the groundbreaking shape.

Weekend Grab Bag: Bill Stewart Airbrush & More

Greetings, Shredderz! As always, here’s another installment of our Weekend Grab Bag series, which features cool boards I have seen listed for sale online recently. Keep reading for the rundown, including a rad OP surfboard with a sweet Bill Stewart airbrush, and more…

Surf Line Hawaii Fish (Craigslist Hawaii)

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The board above is an unusual twin fin fish with a classic Seventies Surf Line Hawaii laminate on it. I wrote a Deep Dive on Surf Line Hawaii a while back, and it remains one of my favorite blog posts, even if it doesn’t seem to be all that popular. I’m not sure who shaped the board, and I suspect it might have been originally made as a twin fin, but just about every other Surf Line Hawaii surfboard I have seen is a Seventies single fin.

Dewey Weber Ski Model (Craigslist Hawaii)

Click the photos above to enlarge. This is a gorgeous Transition Era surfboard that comes complete with a WAVE Set fin. The board has been restored by Randy Rarick. I have a weakness for hulls of all shapes and sizes, and this one definitely fits the bill.

OP Thruster with Bill Stewart Airbrush (Craigslist Norfolk)

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Bill Stewart’s airbrushes were the subject of the most recent installment of the excellent Surfboards and Coffee series. This OP Surfboard has a pretty bitchin’ Bill Stewart airbrush, which you can also see in the image at the very top of the page. The board is priced at $475. It also happens to come with what looks like an original Rainbow Fin, so if you’re local, this could be worth it with the Bill Stewart airbrush and the collectible fin.

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Presents Expression Session 5: California Dreamin’

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Hobie Corky Carroll Stringerless Model (Craigslist Monterey)

Anecdotally, I see a lot of Hobie Corky Carroll models floating around for sale on Craigslist, eBay, etc. I’m guessing they were produced in pretty high numbers during the Sixties. The Hobie Corky Carroll model featured above is a stringerless variant, which I don’t believe I have ever seen before. Looks like the glass leash loop was probably added after the fact, but it’s still a very cool board complete with the original bolt through fin.

Hobie Terry Martin Twin Fin

I don’t get paid by the word here — in fact, I don’t get paid at all — so I’ll keep it short and sweet. There is a super cool Hobie Terry Martin twin fin for sale on Craigslist in Orange County, and it’s listed at what I think is an exceedingly reasonable $210. You can find a link to the board here.

All the photos here are via the original Craigslist post. As you can see, the Hobie Terry Martin twin fin has all the bells and whistles: a vaguely Pottz inspired airbrush, with a sick contrasting bottom; glass on twin fins; a four channel bottom; and yes, a Clark Foam laminate. The seller claims the board was shaped in the Eighties.

There’s no close-up shot of that laminate between the fins on the bottom of the board. Anyone have any ideas what that might be?

I think this is a great deal for a very cool board, and that’s really all there is to it. Check out the Hobie Terry Martin twin fin on Craigslist here, and if you end up snagging it, let me know what that laminate is.

Summer Grab Bag: Odds and Ends

Greetings, Shredderz, and welcome to another installment of the Grab Bag! The Grab Bag is a series where I feature an assortment of various boards that are listed for sale. As of the time this article was written, all the boards below were still available. Without any further do, see below for some sick sleds:

1964 Hobie Surfboards Noserider on eBay (Link)

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Oh baby, this thing is clean! The seller claims the board is completely original and unrestored. I don’t know what to make of the price. It’s listed for $3,600, and I simply don’t have enough context on these older Hobies to make any sort of assessment. I want to say it’s expensive relative to other vintage Hobies, but again, not my area of expertise.

Eighties Wave Tools Single Fin on eBay (Link)

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This board isn’t nearly as tidy as the example above, but it has more than enough character to make up for it. You gotta respect any board with a checkerboard design on the deck. There’s also a certain degree of swagger that goes into that enormous Wave Tools logo on the bottom. I dig it all! The board isn’t cheap — it’s listed for $875, and I’m curious if it will get that price, given that it needs some repairs still — but it’s bitchin’ nonetheless.

1967 Hobie Gary Propper Model w/Triple Stringer on Craigslist (Link)

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Never seen a Hobie Gary Propper Model with this kind of stringer setup before. This board also sports the infamous Hobie bolt through fin, and even comes with the original one, too. It looks like most of the board, outside of the nose, has extra layers of Volan glass, but I’m not 100% certain.

1963 Con Surfboards Noserider on Craigslist (Link)

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I’m a sucker for Con Surfboards, especially their older logs. The board above looks like it’s in pretty stellar condition. Once again, the catch is the price. The seller is asking $2,500, which I think is a bit on the high end. That said, the seller claims it’s all original and has never been restored, and it’s not every day you encounter a fifty five year old surfboard in such great condition.

“The Endless Summer” Mike Hynson Surfboard

As many of you already know, Bruce Brown, the filmmaker behind “The Endless Summer”, recently passed away. “The Endless Summer” is one of the rare surf movies to have achieved mainstream success. And while “The Endless Summer” is best known as a movie that captures the inherent grace and simplicity of the surfing lifestyle, it also happens to feature some pretty rad surfboards as well. And what better way to celebrate Brown’s life, and his signature film, than to spotlight a reproduction of the Hobie surfboard that star Mike Hynson sports throughout “The Endless Summer.”

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Still from “The Endless Summer.” Hynson is on the right.

I’m not quite sure what happened to the original board from the movie, but in the years since the film’s release, Hobie and Hynson have released some reproductions of the board. In fact, there is one that is currently for sale on Craigslist in Tampa Bay, Florida. You can find a link to the board here.

As you can see, the board is a beautiful reproduction of the striped Hobie surfcraft that Mike Hynson can be seen riding throughout the film. There are a ton of gorgeous details, too, like a lovely glass-on fin, the dual logos — including a pretty enormous Hobie laminate — and a signature from Hynson himself.

The Hobie / Endless Summer Mike Hynson board pictured here also comes with a certificate of authenticity. Unlike the certificates offered by folks like Terry Fitzgerald, it’s more of a letter written by Hobie Surfboards, dating the board to 2012 and providing some basic background on the shape. Even though the board is signed by Mike Hynson, the letter cryptically mentions that the board was “hand finished” by Hobie shaper Gary Larson. I’m not quite sure what to make of this, but I tend to think it’s unlikely that Hynson did a ton of the shaping himself. The mention of hand finishing makes me wonder if these replicas weren’t machine shaped off an original Mike Hynson template before some finishing touches they were put on. To be clear, this is a very common practice in modern surfboard production, but I don’t think these modern Hobie / Endless Summer Mike Hynson boards are hand shaped from start to finish.

Then again, the entire point of the Hobie Endless Summer replica is to celebrate the film in all its glory. There are very few movies that can claim to have forever changed the trajectory of an entire culture, and “The Endless Summer” belongs in that small, elite club. The surfing world will forever be indebted to Bruce Brown for the loving way in which he documented surfing and shared it with the rest of the world.

You can check out the listing for the board here.

Clark Foam Ad from the 1960s: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Welcome to yet another installment of Sagas of Shred. Every Thursday we feature a different slice of surf history, and today’s entry sheds a light on one of the most accomplished businessmen the surf industry has ever seen: Gordon “Grubby” Clark, the founder and CEO of Clark Foam.

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Gordon “Grubby” Clark in an early Clark Foam promotional photo. Pic via Charlie Bunger’s Long Island Surfing Museum

Before its abrupt closing in 2005, Clark Foam was one of the most fearsome forces in the surfboard industry. There are endless stories about Clark’s ruthlessness. The Surfboard Project has an anecdote, via Joel Tudor, about how Donald Takayama’s first label went under after Clark Foam denied him blanks. Surfer Magazine recently ran a retrospective on the Clark Foam closing, which includes similar tales of strong-arm tactics.

In the early 1960s, though, Clark had yet to establish its dominance, and this ad, at least, makes an earnest appeal to quality and performance instead. I love the fact that just about every single big name surfboard brand at the time has their logos present: Yater, Bing, Ole, Hobie, Wardy, Hansen, and Con. Of that list, only Wardy no longer continues to produce boards (although Con is a completely different company, and Bing Copeland has ceded control to well-regarded shaper Matt Calvani.)

For a great article on the early years of Clark Foam, and how Grubby and Hobie Alter helped lay the groundwork for the modern surfboard industry, I recommend the “727 Laguna Canyon Road” feature in The Surfer’s Journal.

Hope you enjoyed this entry in Sagas of Shred, and tune in next Thursday for what comes next!

Original Hobie Phil Edwards Model Surfboard

Greetings, Shredderz! Here at Shred Sledz HQ we like to think of ourselves as equal opportunity surfboard enthusiasts. Stoke levels remain high for all kinds of vintage surfboards, ranging from underground Santa Cruz shapers to household names like Gerry Lopez. Even so, it can be difficult to resist the urge to play favorites. Such is the case with the Hobie Phil Edwards Model surfboard, which holds a special place in the hearts of Shred Sledz staff. If you missed our earlier post covering the Hobie Phil Edwards model, I urge you to check it out here. It’s a detailed look at the various Hobie Phil Edward Model surfboards that have been sold at auction. As always, if there are any missing boards you know of, don’t hesitate to drop me a line!

Pictured above is a Hobie Phil Edwards Model Surfboard that is currently for sale on eBay. Pics are all via the eBay listing, which you can find here. The board is exciting for a number of reasons. First of all, it’s an example from the original run of the Hobie Phil Edwards boards, as evidenced by the foil logo and the serial number. This is the first time I have seen board #586 appear (my previous post covered boards with serial nos #999, #865, #103, and #479). The seller dates the board to 1963. You can see it has the classic triple stringer setup, with a 3/4″ central stringer made from redwood, and then two 1/4″ redwood stringers flanking it on either side. The dimensions of the board are 9’3″ x 20-7/8″ x 3″, which should be provide ample paddling power on top of all the necessary style points. It’s interesting to compare the lengths of the various boards: #103 is 9’9″; #865 is 10′; and #479 is also 10′. I was unable to find data on #999.

It’s unclear to me the extent to which the board has been restored. The listing mentions that #586 has been re-glossed by surfboard whisperer Randy Rarick, but I’m not sure if that amounts to a total restoration.

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Close up of the fin. The seller claims this is the original one that came with the board. If so, it’s remarkable that it has retained its color over the years! Pic via eBay

The fin stands out as well. The seller claims that this is the original “two-tone powder blue fin.” Board #999 has an identical fin, although it looks like the color has faded over time. It’s interesting to note that boards #103 and #479 have wooden fins. The auction listing for #103 describes it as a reverse mahogany fin. Board #865, meanwhile, has what looks like a fiberglass fin similar to #586, but it is a burgundy color. I’m not sure if there’s any discernible pattern for why a given Hobie Phil Edwards Model surfboard would come with one type of fin or another.

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Goodness gracious, this board has some beautiful lines. Pic via eBay

The starting bid for #586 is $2,400. All the historical data I have for other Phil Edwards sales involve all-original, unrestored boards: #103 apparently closed at $4,925; #865 is still on sale for $4,000; and #999 was estimated to sell for anywhere between $2,000 and $5,000.

If you’re interested in the board — it would make an ideal gift for your favorite vintage surfboards blogger — please check it out here.

Joyce Hoffman Model for Hobie Surfboards

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post features the first-ever woman to have a signature surfboard in her name: Joyce Hoffman. As evidenced in the photo above, Hoffman rips! This shouldn’t come as a surprise, given that Hoffman is a part of the legendary Hoffman / Fletcher clan (daughter of Walter, niece of big-wave surfer Flippy, sister to Dibi, aunt to Christian and Nathan Fletcher…the list goes on). Joyce Hoffman was one of the few women who surfed Oahu’s fearsome Sunset Beach during the 1960s. In addition, Joyce Hoffman was one of the more accomplished competitive surfers of the decade, racking up a number of contest wins and even a famous Sports Illustrated writeup in 1965. Hobie Surfboard produced the Joyce Hoffman Model starting in the mid-1960s in order to capitalize on her growing status.

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Joyce Hoffman (left) and Margo Godfrey Oberg (right). Makaha, 1968. Photographer unknown; pic via Pleasure Photo

There is currently a Hobie Surfboards Joyce Hoffman model for sale on Craigslist, which is a great opportunity to shine a light on the board and its namesake. You can find a link to the board here.

Pics above are via the Craigslist posting. The Hobie Joyce Hoffman model measures in at 9’9″, and it features a step deck and a removable fin. Before we proceed, can we get a shout out to the poster for providing clear, detailed photos of the board in question? ShredSledz.net would have about three times the number of entries if more sellers posted great pics of their boards, but I digress…

The classic Hobie bolt-through fin clearly indicates the board was made in the 1960s. Check out the picture above on the right, which is a top down shot of the deck side of the tail.

The Hobie Joyce Hoffman Model pictured above is from Hobie’s initial run of boards. You can tell by the Joyce Hoffman signature and the diamond shape. Hobie Surfboards has an excellent blog post detailing the history of the board, including the fun fact that Joyce’s “signature” was in fact drawn by her mother! According to Dick Metz for the Surfing Heritage and Cultural Center, the initial Joyce Hoffman model was introduced in 1967. Check out the SHACC’s link here, which has some great pictures, as well as a cool explanation of the board.

Pictured above is the SHCC’s Hobie Joyce Hoffman model. The fins on the SHACC and Craigslist boards look quite similar to one another. There’s a separate post on Hobie’s website dating the SHACC board to 1968.

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Close-up of the signature on the SHCC’s Hobie Joyce Hoffman Model. You can see it was also signed by Terry Martin, the longtime Hobie shaper. Pic via SHACC

The Hobie Joyce Hoffman Model belonging to the SHACC also has a signature from Terry Martin. I think it’s possible Martin could have shaped the board being sold on Craigslist, but given there are no signatures anywhere, it is difficult to say.

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Close-up of a fin signed by Joyce Hoffman and Terry Martin. The yellow fin was an extra fin that goes along with the SHACC board. Pic via SHACC

The SHACC board also came with an extra fin, which you can see above. Note the construction: you can clearly see the screw, which was used to bolt Hobie fins through the decks of the boards. Swaylocks also has a thread with pictures of another first generation Hobie Joyce Hoffman Model; you can find the link here.

Finally, at some point the Hobie Joyce Hoffman Model was redesigned with a floral logo. I believe this happened sometime around 1968. As detailed in the SHACC post, Dick Metz believes that less than 400 of the first generation Joyce Hoffman Models were produced.

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Close-up shot of the logo from a second generation Hobie Joyce Hoffman Model surfboard. As you can see, Joyce’s first name was removed from the board. Tsk, tsk, Hobie! Pic via Swaylocks

The removal of Joyce’s first name from the logo is suspicious, to say the least. One has to believe Joyce’s name was eliminated in order to make the board more appealing to male consumers. Curiously, the Joyce Hoffman Model was still referred to as such in Hobie advertisements.

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Hobie ad from 1968. The board in the center is the second generation Joyce Hoffman Model. Note that the second row of photos shows the corresponding tails and fins for each board in the ad. Fitting in with the times, the second generation Joyce Hoffman Model had some vee added to its bottom. Pic via the incomparable DIS•PLACE•MEN•TIA

On the bright side, no amount of cynical rebranding efforts can dim Joyce Hoffman’s radness. The board’s seller is asking $600, and you can find a link to the board here.