Yes, Another Vintage Liddle

You sick of seeing these vintage Liddle single fins yet? Me neither. This gem was lurking on Craigslist in Orange County last week before the listing was taken down. I have to assume the board was snapped up by another collector.

The Liddle single fin you see pictured here measures 7’1″, and it’s far more of a traditional Seventies single fin outline than the displacement hulls that one mostly associates with Greg Liddle and his eponymous label.

The board featured in this post is similar to another Liddle single fin I wrote up a little over a year ago. For whatever reason, the orange laminates mostly appear on older Liddle boards. I’m not entirely sure why that is, but I can’t think of any post 2000s Liddle boards I’ve seen with an orange laminate.

The Liddle single fin isn’t in pristine condition, but all things considered it is in pretty good shape. The board was listed on Craigslist for $800, which seems about right given everything going on. I tend to think the hulls command a bit of a higher price than the standard single fins, but I’m down with both.

And no blog post on a vintage Liddle would be complete without some complete overkill on analyzing the signature on the board. I wrote up an Eighties Liddle hull last week, and in the post I did some analysis around the serial numbers of various vintage Liddles, as well as the dates assigned to the serial numbers per the Liddle Surfboards website.

Judging from the outline of the orange laminate board here, as well as the single fin setup, it’s almost certainly shaped in the Seventies, or maybe the Eighties. For example, see here for some similar boards from the Liddle website — single fin round pins, just like the one above — that are dated to the Seventies or Eighties. I have also heard that an X on the signature, like the one above, denotes a stock shop board (versus a custom shape).

I’m having trouble reconciling the number on this board — X-1036 — with other similar boards I have seen. For example, I wrote up a different Liddle single fin that looks like it was shaped around the same time as X-1036, and the other board has X-142 written on the stringer. I have reproduced the photos below.

First, I’m not quite sure why the “X” boards are numbered differently. As a reminder, the hull I wrote up last week had the serial number #3070; and before that, I wrote up a single fin with serial number #3249. But even looking strictly at the X boards, I have hard time thinking those numbers are sequential. In other words, I can’t imagine that there are nearly 1,000 boards that were shaped between X-142, the board immediately above; and X-1036, the orange laminate single fin that is the subject of this post.

If you’re a Liddle-ologist with more insight into how Greg numbered his boards, I’d love to hear from you. Otherwise, I hope you enjoyed the pics of this neat vintage Seventies Liddle single fin.

80s Liddle Hull

Greetings, Shredderz! We’ve got a quick hit for you today, but given how collectible Greg Liddle’s surfboards are, I feel good about this being something of a crowd pleasure. Pictured here is a vintage 80s Liddle Hull that Jeff was kind enough to share. Eagle-eyed readers may recognize the background in these pictures: a few months ago I wrote a post on two Surfboards Hawaii V Bottom boards, one of which belonged to Jeff as well. I’ve written up many vintage Liddle Surfboards here, and I don’t see that stopping any time soon.

The Liddle hull has obviously seen some wear and tear in its lifetime. Few things pain me more than seeing a surfboard that has been abused or neglected, but I dig a well-used board that has clearly delivered a bunch of fun to its owner(s) over the years. I imagine the Liddle you see here falls into the latter category.

The owner was also kind enough to include a close up shot of the signature on the Liddle. As you can see in the picture above, the board is 8’6.5″ and it bears #3070. The owner was told that #3070 was shaped sometime in the Eighties.

First, I believe that the numbering on Greg’s hand shaped Liddles is sequential. The last vintage Liddle I wrote up was a non-hull single fin with the serial number #3249. According to the Liddle Surfboards website, which has an incredible archive of pics, #3249 was likely shaped in either the late Seventies or the early Eighties. I was also able to find an entry for Liddle #3031, which is a thruster. If the numbering on Greg’s boards is indeed sequential, then I have to think that #3031, #3070 (the hull featured here), and #3249 were all shaped in the early- to mid-Eighties. I can’t say for sure, though, and this analysis is based on digging through the vast archive of pics on the official Liddle site.

Thanks again to Jeff for shooting over pics of this sweet Eighties Liddle hull. And if you’re the owner of a rad vintage Liddle then don’t be shy and drop me a line!

More Vintage Liddle Single Fin Goodness

Greetings, Shredderz! If you’re reading this blog you are almost certainly familiar with Greg Liddle and his famous displacement hulls. I’ve written up numerous examples of vintage Liddles over the years, including a sweet yellow single fin with an unusual “mirrored” laminate; a different 8’6″ Liddle single fin; and a few others.

When a reader sent me a Craigslist link to the 7’2″ single fin Liddle pictured above, I was immediately intrigued. The post was only up for a few days at most, with an asking price of $850. I can only assume someone pounced on it, as Greg Liddle hand shapes never seem to last long on the open market.

Maybe this says more about my idiosyncrasies than anything else, but the first thing I noticed were the laminates. You can see a small blue laminate on the deck, paired with an oversized black outline laminate on the bottom. I’ve noticed that vintage Liddle surfboards tend to have either larger or smaller laminates than the “standard” size you see on the newer Liddle Designs, for example.

The original Craigslist post mentioned that photos of the board are actually available on the Liddle Surfboards website. As a side note, the Liddle Surfboards website is a glorious throwback to the early days of the internet. The site also has a page that links to a giant collection of Liddle pics. The page has even spawned its own Instagram tribute account, aptly titled “Spaceship Lovers.”

The entry for the 7’2″ single fin notes that the board was found by a guy named Pat Crampton on Craigslist. I’ve reproduced the photos of the board from the Liddle Surfboards site below. You can click the photos to enlarge.

The entry for the board on the Liddle surfboards site also has some good information. As you can see in the signature below, the board has serial number #3249. According to Liddle’s site, the serial number indicates the board was likely shaped in the late Seventies or early Eighties. There’s also some info on the glass job: 6 oz and 4 oz, with a 6 oz Volan tail patch, which you can clearly see in all the photos. I can only assume the 6-4-6 on the stringer is a reference to the glass job.

One thing that’s weird to me is a photo of the signature on the Craigslist listing is somehow missing two numbers. You can see the Craigslist shot of the signature below.

I’m really having a hard time explaining how this could be the case. I’m thinking that maybe the board was signed in two places, but that isn’t clear from either set of pictures, I’m afraid.

As always, thanks for reading, and if you are the proud owner of a sweet Liddle, vintage or otherwise, don’t hesitate to reach out and send me some pics.

Vintage Liddle Single Fin

Today, Shredderz, I’m afraid I have some bad news. The vintage Liddle single fin you see pictured here was sold for a measly $120 on Craigslist, and chances are you missed out on it. Don’t feel too bad because I whiffed on it, too. I called up the seller as soon as I saw the ad and he literally laughed. To be clear, he was very nice and polite. I think he was more surprised than anything else, as I’m sure he spent the afternoon fending off a bunch of thirsty surfboard collectors. If you scooped up this thing, feel free to drop me a line — would love to know more about it.

According to the listing, the vintage Liddle single fin pictured above is 6’6″. No other dimensions were mentioned. The board looks like it’s more of a standard single fin than one of Greg Liddle‘s famous (and collectible) hulls. I’ve posted some other vintage Liddle single fins, which you can find here and here. I have a hard time dating his boards, given that Liddle has been so true to the displacement hull design over the decades. If you held a gun to my head I would say the board was shaped in the Seventies, or maybe early Eighties. You don’t see a ton of Liddle boards that have resin tints, and the smaller font size on the logo seems to be mostly associated with older boards, too.

The other thing tripping me out is the unique mirrored logo. I have never seen that logo on any other board. I’m not sure what, if any, story there is behind the laminate, but I do know it looks very cool.

Price Checks: Vintage Liddle Surfboards

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ll be talking surfboards and cold, hard cash. Yes, I know: some people out there hate the financial aspect of surfboard collecting. (If you have any tips on how it can be done for free, well, I’m all ears.) But more than anything else, I think it’s helpful to give people an idea of what prices to expect for certain collectible boards. Today we have not one but two vintage Greg Liddle boards, both of which are still for sale. Without any further ado, here’s an overview of the sticks and some thoughts around what the sellers are asking.

7’2″ Vintage Greg Liddle Surfboard (Craigslist Los Angeles): $1,000

Two things alert me to the fact this is an older Liddle surfboard: first, the purple logo seems to have been mostly used for older shapes; and second, the logo looks oversized as well. That said, it’s really hard for me to say when Greg’s boards were shaped. I tend to think this one was shaped during the Seventies or the Eighties due to the laminate, but I’m not 100% sure.

I can’t believe I’m going to type this, but I don’t think the price is completely insane. That said, the fact the listing is still up makes me wonder if it’s not priced a tad on the high side, as vintage Liddles tend to vanish whenever they pop up on Craigslist. The more I look at this board the more I think it’s likely it’s not a hull (thanks to Jesse for confirming), which would explain why it hasn’t been sold. Compare the purple laminate board above to this vintage Liddle gun that I wrote up earlier — you’ll notice some similarities between the two.

Finally, here’s a photo of another vintage Liddle board with a purple laminate, courtesy of artist / hull aficionado Alan Casagrande.

7’0″ Vintage Greg Liddle Downrail Single Fin (Craigslist Santa Barbara): $300

Whenever possible, I prefer all-original surfboards, even if it means making some compromises on the cosmetic front. But in the case of the Seventies Liddle single fin you see above, I think a full on glass off restoration job is likely the best route. Given the board above will likely have to be fully restored, I think the $300 price tag is ambitious. It’d be one thing if the board were a classic hull design, but it’s a more unusual (and traditional) Seventies downrail single fin. Don’t get me wrong, I dig that it’s a little different, but at the end of the day, most collectors want to see the classics, which in Liddle’s case mean his displacement hulls. I hope someone snags this board and does it justice, as it is a very cool design.

Shaper Spotlight: Surfboards by Todd Pinder

Greetings, Shredderz! I’d like to welcome all of you to a brand spanking new series on the blog, titled “Shaper Spotlight.” Up until now, this humble blog has focused mostly on vintage surfboards. I think it’s also important to profile contemporary shapers who are building boards today. There’s a ton of rich history found in older surfboards, and that will always be a big part of Shred Sledz. That said, there’s only one way to ensure hand shaped surfboards continue to get their due, and that’s by supporting the talented craftsmen who build them.

Last month I took my first ever trip to Oahu, and during that time I was lucky enough to meet up with Todd Pinder, the man behind Surfboards by Todd Pinder. Pinder plies his trade in Honolulu, where he painstakingly crafts each and every board by hand. This doesn’t just apply to shaping, however — Pinder is one of those rare shapers who also glasses all of his own creations, too.

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Todd Pinder creates all his boards by hand, shaping and glassing his creations. Here are a few boards waiting to be finished. Love the bold but simple red color.

Pinder might be a modern surfboard builder, but he draws upon some very deep roots from years of living in Hawaii and working alongside some well respected folks, like Carl Schaper (pronounced Shopper) and Donald Takayama. Pinder also continues to provide boards for folks like Joel Tudor and his sons.

Pinder’s shop is filled with a bunch of rad vintage sticks. See below for a neat Seventies Greg Liddle single fin. I can’t recall off the top of my head whether it was a hull, but I really dig the unusual pattern on the deck. Click the photos below to enlarge.

I got to see the Bing David Nuuhiwa Noseriding model that Joel Tudor posted about below. Todd told me the Nuuhiwa is a little shorter than other stock DN Noseriding models from the same time period.

The single coolest board Pinder showed me was an insane Joe Quigg paddleboard. Make sure you click the photos below to enlarge, as they show off the paddleboard in a bit more detail. Check out the squared off tail. The Joe Quigg paddleboard has incredibly thick rails, and I think it’s about 12′ long, so there’s plenty of paddle power to spare. You can see Pinder posing alongside this board in the post at the top of the page.

Here are some earlier photos, via Pinder’s Facebook page, that show Joe Quigg alongside Todd and the paddleboard.

That’s not all Pinder had stashed away, however. Upstairs in his shaping room Pinder also had a Seventies Surf Line Hawaii single fin shaped by Buddy Dumphy and a Gordon & Smith Skip Frye from the late Sixties. Click the photos below to enlarge. I couldn’t quite figure out which model the G&S / Skip Frye board is — maybe a “Speed Board”? — but it’s interesting that it has a small text G&S logo, instead of the classic bow tie logo that we all know and love. Pinder tells me the outline on the G&S / Skip Frye board has inspired some of his own egg shapes.

If you’re still not satisfied, well, there’s more. Pinder also showed off a sick Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel. The Sopwith Camel is one of Tom Morey’s many quirky and incredible Transition Era shapes, featuring an early stringerless design. I could go on a rant about how Tom Morey might be the most underrated inventor in surfing history, but I’ll save that for another time.

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Pinder with a very cool Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel.

And while Pinder’s shaping room is filled with vintage gems, I’m even more stoked about his current creations. I mentioned it earlier, but it’s worth repeating: Pinder shapes and glasses all of his boards. Yes, all of them. Surfboards are often marketed as bespoke goods, but the manufacturing reality can be the opposite. When you order a surfboard from Pinder, you know it was built by one set of very capable hands from start to finish. If you even have the slightest appreciation for craftsmanship, that should resonate with you. As a bonus, Todd is a very friendly and surf stoked individual.

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Pinder posing alongside some of his newer creations. Pic via Surfboards by Todd Pinder Facebook Page

If you’re in the market for a beautiful new board, hit up Surfboards by Todd Pinder and tell him we sent you! You can also follow him on Instagram here and on Facebook here. Thanks Todd for inviting me to your studio and for sharing the story behind some killer surfboards!

Camels, Connections and Case Studies

Greetings, Shredderz! Here’s a handful of recent videos related to vintage surfboards and/or alternative surf craft that I enjoyed. Hope they bring you some stoke, too.

Of all the cult surfboard shapers in the world, is there anyone more notable than Greg Liddle? The video above, which was produced by Daydream Surf Shop as part of their excellent “Case Study” series, goes deep on Liddle history with displacement hull OG Kirk Putnam. For example, did you know that Liddle often handed out board templates alongside any custom board orders? Before watching this video it had never occurred to me that you could be jealous of another person’s garage, but Putnam’s man cave, which has more surf history per square foot than any other structure on the planet, is a doozy. The video also some great vintage footage of folks riding older Liddle hulls, which is always a treat.

“Camel Finds Water” is a really enjoyable video. It doesn’t actually have a ton of surfing, but more importantly, it manages to fit a bunch of great stuff — adventure, friendship, hard work, and uncrowded spots — in its modest run time. As an admittedly well below average surfer, it’s hard to relate to a lot of modern surf videos. At their worst, surf videos can have an unhealthy preoccupation with “high performance”, focusing strictly on technical (and admittedly impressive maneuvers), while stripping out all the intangible things that I love most about surfing. “Camel Finds Water”, presented by Santa Barbara surfer Trevor Gordon, is a mini adventure featuring some remote waves, smooth surfing, and some cool-looking Ryan Lovelace-shaped sticks.

I wrote up the first entry of Mollusk’s “Craft Connection” series in the last Clipz post, and here’s more of the same goodness. Talented surfer / shapers don’t grow on trees, but Tyler Warren is definitely one of them. Video by Jack Coleman.

Social Media Roundup: Santa Barbara Edition

It’s the first Social Media Roundup of 2019, and today we’re focusing on some recent posts that delve into the rich history of Santa Barbara surfing. Alright, enough from me, and onto the pics…

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This is a photo of an early eighties shaping machine – Al Merrick. I wish I would have shot more of Al actually shaping. Using film back in the day to shoot in the shaping room, you really needed to spend time setting up lights to do well. It is a room design to absorb light not bounce it. Film and cameras just did not have the ability to capture motion in that type of lighting conditions without some form of strobe. Very much different than the cameras now. The full lighting setup took too much time and when shooting Al or any shaper in high demand, you were stopping production, literally. Shooting Al was usually a 30 minute disruption max with one hand held strobe. Al was always great about it, never pressured me to hurry. The rush was always self imposed. This shot is outside of the old factory. It’s an insurance shot in case the one strobe did not render anything desirable. • Shaper, board, and rider • @cisurfboards #almerrick @curfuffle #tomcurren #surfboards #surfboardshaper #surfboardshaping #surfphoto #surfphotos #surfphotographer #surflifestyle

A post shared by Jimmy Metyko (@metykojimmy) on

I’ve featured his work here a few times before, but I can’t help doing it again, because Jimmy Metyko is a must follow! His Instagram feed is a who’s who of the Santa Barbara surf scene back in the day, and he’s also a very talented photographer. You should check out a recent slideshow of his photos on Surfer Magazine’s website. This portrait of Al Merrick is simple and striking. I’m assuming it’s from the same shoot as the featured photo at the top of the page. Make sure you scroll through for the bonus shot of a young Tom Curren riding a Channel Islands shape.

The black & white Santa Barbara theme continues, but this time around we have a very clean Transition Era Yater hull / vee bottom board. Wish there were some dimensions listed on this bad boy. You don’t see these late Sixties Yaters everywhere, but I think they are among some of Renny’s coolest shapes.

Alan Casagrande is a talented artist who has a long history with Liddle Surfboards. I was blown away to discover that the board he’s holding in the picture is a Liddle. I can’t be sure but it almost looks like a sting! Either way the outline doesn’t have much in common with Greg Liddle’s famous displacement hulls.

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ABALONE SPOON YATER LOGO

A post shared by Bob Haakenson (@haakenson_fiberglass) on

And what better way to introduce a little color to this entry than by way of a stunning abalone inlay on a Yater Spoon? Abalone was once plentiful up and down the California coast, and I love how Bob Haakenson, one of Santa Barbara’s finest glassers, still uses it for special occasions. This is a subtle but awesome touch to add to a custom Yater, if you ask me.

Photo at the top of the page by Jimmy Metyko; via Surfer Magazine.

Weekend Grab Bag: Yater Spoon & More

Greetings, Shredderz! I’d like to think the blog has been off to a nice start this year, with content like this absolute weapon of a Channel Islands single fin sporting an epic Jack Meyer airbrush, or scans of an old Eaton Surfboards brochure sent to me by a reader. Ultimately, though, that’s for all of you to decide. If you’re still reading this, first I would like to say thank you, and second, let’s get right to the next installment of the Weekend Grab Bag, where I highlight some of my favorite boards currently listed for sale on the internet. Scroll down for a selection of sick vintage sticks that are currently up for grabs.

9’10” Andreini Spoon (Craigslist Santa Cruz)

Marc Andreini is one of my all-time favorite shapers. The board above is a take on Renny Yater’s famous Spoon design, which, fifty plus years after its invention, remains one of the greatest noserider surfboards ever crafted. Andreini, who spent formative years shaping and surfing in Santa Barbara, considers Yater one of his chief influences. (Check out “The Gift” for more info on Andreini and California surfboard history.) The Andreini spoon pictured above isn’t quite vintage — the seller estimates it was shaped in 1996 or so — but it’s old enough to qualify as interesting (to me, anyway). As best I could tell, Andreini’s current noserider model does not have the step deck you see on both the Yater Spoon and the board above. No matter what, this Andreini spoon is a cool board from one of California’s great living shapers, and at $575, I think it’s more than reasonably priced. See below for a video of Joe Davies riding an Andreini Owl Noserider, which is via Andreini’s own website. (And if you’re into unique Andreini boards, here’s a Bonzer that’s currently for sale.)

9’8″ Yater Spoon from 2000 (Craigslist San Diego)

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And now that we’ve seen a take on the Yater Spoon, how about one from the OG himself? I think the price might be a bit steep on the Yater Spoon pictured above. The seller is asking $1399. He claims the board has only been surfed once, and it certainly looks to be in extra clean condition. Even so, you can easily find a brand new Yater Spoon on Mollusk’s website listed at $1199 before tax. To each his own, but I think we can all agree that you simply can’t go wrong with a Yater Spoon.

9’6″ Greg Liddle L Spoon (Craigslist Ventura)

Greg Liddle’s L Spoon design is also influenced by Renny Yater. See the Liddle Surfboards website for more info. Honestly, I’m a little surprised this board is still listed for sale. It has been up for over two weeks, which is longer than most Greg Liddle hand shapes last on Craigslist. I’m wondering if the board hasn’t already been sold, and the seller never bothered to take down the listing. The Liddle L Spoon listed above is priced at $1500. No matter what, I’m a sucker for that old school Crash Test Dummies inspired Liddle Surfboards logo, too.

Weekend Grab Bag: Liddle Reef Smoothie and More

Greetings, Shredderz! Sorry for the relatively parse posting schedule last week. I don’t want to tip my hand, but I think we’ve got some gems coming up that should make up for it. In the meantime, here are some boards for sale that I think you might dig, including a Liddle Reef Smoothie. Keep scrolling for more:

Liddle Reef Smoothie Model (Craigslist Ventura)

Frankly, I’m surprised this Liddle Reef Smoothie model is still listed for sale. (See more about this model on the Liddle Surfboards site.) The seller is asking $1,200. As always, pricing surfboards is more art than science, but collectors have been welling to shell out top dollar for vintage Liddles as of late. For comparison, Kirk Putnam sold a Marty Peach Liddle for $1,200, which you can see on his Instagram here. This board has the classic Liddle crash test dummy logo, which is always a nice touch.

Hawaiian Island Creations Single Fin (Craigslist Santa Barbara)

This stick is pretty bitchin’. I really love these old school HIC boards, and while it’s a well known brand, it doesn’t have nearly the cachet of something like Town & Country. This one is super sick — I love the triple icon logo, the channel bottom, and as a nice bonus it comes with an original Rainbow fin. The seller is asking $450, which I think is right there in the ballpark.

Con Surfboards CC Rider (Craigslist SF Bay Area)

This bad boy is 10’2″ of classic longboard beauty. I love colors on this board, and in particular, the contrast between the yellow bottom and the blue high density foam stringer. Seller is asking $950. The fin is apparently a Greenough Stage III Wonderbolt fin — gotta love it any time someone puts a lot of detail into a Craigslist post. For more on the Con Surfboards CC Rider model, check out this Deep Dive I wrote a while back.

Bing Bonzer Redux (Craigslist Orange County)

Bing Bonzer Surfboard Tail

I actually wrote up this board a few months back, and it’s back on Craigslist at $400, or half the price at which it was offered before. This thing has a bunch of pressure dings on the deck, but I love the colors and the resin pinlines, and that fin is gorgeous, too.