Price Checks: Eighties Local Motion Surfboards

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’re going to take a look at the prices for two beautiful Eighties Local Motion thrusters that are currently up for sale.

Eighties Local Motion Surfboards Example #1: 6’2″ 2+1 shaped by Greg Griffin in 1982 (Link)

Here’s a example of a rad Eighties Local Motions Surfboards thruster being offered for sale on eBay. The starting bid for the board is $600, and as of the time of writing this post, the surfboard has yet to receive a single bid. This board was shaped by Greg Griffin, a Hawaiian shaper who has been at his craft since the late Sixties. I’m a little surprised the board has yet to receive bids, as it looks to me like a prime example of an Eighties thruster. The airbrush on the deck and the bottom is gorgeous, and Griffin is a well-known shaper with tons of experience. In addition, the surfboard looks to be in very good condition. A lot of eBay auctions don’t heat up until the end, and with two days left it’s possible that prospective bidders are just waiting this one out.

Eighties Local Motion Surfboards Example #2: 5’9″ Channel Bottom Shaped by Pat Rawson, $400 (Link)

This board has been on Craigslist for the past few weeks, and frankly, I’m a little surprised that it’s still up for sale. To me, it ticks a lot of the boxes: you have a colorful airbrush, some rad logos, and of course, shaping pedigree courtesy of Pat Rawson. Rawson has an impeccable resume as a surfboard shaper. As a bonus, Rawson is also a great follow on Instagram.

Eighties Local Motion Surfboards Pat Rawson Signature.jpg
Close up of Pat Rawson’s signature on the Eighties Local Motion 2+1 Thruster

The Eighties Local Motion surfboard above isn’t perfect. You can see some discoloration on the bottom of the board, and it’s clear that one of the glass-on side bites has had some work done. Still, though, the surfboard is in great condition, and I’m surprised no one has snapped it up for $400. Maybe at 5’9″ it’s a little small for some folks, but I would have thought an Eighties Local Motion with a neon spray job in this kind of condition would get snapped up quickly.

In conclusion, I wouldn’t say either of these Eighties Local Motions Surfboards are bargains, but I think they are reasonably priced and in good condition. I think both boards have a lot of things going for them, whether it’s the aesthetics or the involvements of well-regarded shapers in both cases. Anyway, I’ve left links to the boards above in case you’re interested in either one. Thanks for reading!

Local Motion Twin Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have another Shred Sledz Submission from Bobby — a fellow Gators fan — in Florida, who was kind enough to share these photos of a sweet Local Motion twin fin he picked up recently. Thank you Bobby for sharing pics of the board! Give Bobby a follow on Instagram for his troubles, and as always, hit me up if you have a board you would like to see featured here!

I would guess the board was shaped in either the late 70s or early 80s. You’ll notice the dual fin boxes, complete with some very sweet Rainbow Fins.

Local Motion Twin Fin Fins.jpg
Close up of the fins on the Local Motion twin fin. Not sure if these are considered standard fin boxes. They don’t look like examples of Star Fin boxes I have seen.
Since Stoked-n-Board is still down, I don’t have an easy way of looking up the list of shapers who made boards for Local Motion during the Seventies and Eighties. The only name I know off the top of my head is Pat Rawson, and this doesn’t appear to be a Rawson shape based off the signature.

Local Motion Twin Fin Signature.jpg
Close up of the signature on the Local Motion twin fin. Anyone have any guesses as to who this might be?

Regardless, this Local Motion twin fin is a super sweet board. First, the aesthetics of the board really stand out thanks to the colorful spray job and the multiple Local Motion laminates. It took me a bit to realize that there are actually two different types of Local Motion logos on the board. I’m partial to the palm tree version myself, especially in the loud pink color on the deck. I also love the outline of the board. The combination of the twin fin setup and the round tail strikes me as a little unusual (and very cool).

Finally, Bobby provided some shots of the Local Motion twin fin alongside a sick little channel bottom Lightning Bolt Tom Eberly twin fin. Thanks again Bobby for sharing your pics, and go Gators!

 

Vintage Bonzer Surfboards at Wi-5 Premier

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post is a bit bittersweet. On one hand, we have the premier of “Wi-5”, a short film collaboration between Taylor Knox and the Campbell Brothers, who famously invented the Bonzer surfboard design. The premier brought out some of surfing’s biggest stars, and it was also an impromptu exhibit for some wonderful examples of vintage Bonzer surfboards. On the other, the film’s premier doubled as a charity benefit for Leeanne Ericson, who was attacked by a shark while swimming off San Onofre. Ms. Ericson faces some pretty hefty medical bills as a result. I urge you to check out her GoFundMe campaign here. Shout out to Taylor Knox, Mick Fanning, and everyone else who helped raise money for the good cause!

The Hi-5 premier was chock full of acts of charity AND some rad vintage Bonzer surfboards. See above for an Instagram post from Buggs of Surfboard Line fame. You’ll see some incredible vintage Bonzers flanking Duncan Campbell in the center. I took the descriptions from an Instagram Live broadcast that Buggs streamed during the event, where he got Duncan Campbell to provide some details about the boards.

The yellow board on the far left was shaped in 1973 / 1974 and was designed for the Hawaiian winter, hence the Lightning Bolt laminate. However, I don’t think it’s an “official” Bolt in any way. There’s also a Bing logo affixed to the yellow board. The orange board, second from left, was shaped in 1975 / 1976 and it was made in the Campbell brothers’ stomping grounds of Oxnard, California. The center board was one of the two main Bonzers ridden by Taylor Knox in the film.

The multi-colored board located third from right was shaped in 1977, and apparently it is one of only two similar Bonzers that were made. The multi-colored board is particularly interesting because of its Australian influence. In the video, which is no longer viewable, Duncan Campbell shows off the channel bottom of the multi-colored Bonzer and mentions that it was informed by the designs of Col Smith and Jim Pollard, who were shaping for Shane sub-label Fluid Foils at the time. Pollard in particular is known for being an early proponent of channel bottom boards. Andrew Kidman has a great interview with Al Byrne detailing Pollard’s early contributions to the design.

Col Smith Hawaii Boards 1977 via CrowsGarage.com
Col Smith showing off one of his Jim Pollard-shaped Fluid Foils. The photo was taken shortly before Smith left for Hawaii in 1977, where he turned heads with his surfing. Pic via the excellent entry on Crow’s Garage, which is a must-read!
Shane Surfboards Fluid Foils from BoardCollector.com.jpg
Fluid Foils logo detailing Jim Pollard and Col Smith (look at the bottom right). You can also see the logo on Col Smith’s board at the far left in the photo above. Photo via Boardcollector.com

I wish I had more pictures of the multi-colored Bonzer to share; sadly, the only ones I can find are also from the event. Still, in the photo below, you can see some more of the deep channels on the board. You’ll notice the channels on the multi-colored vintage Bonzer travel up most of the length of the board, very similar to the board Col Smith is holding in the photo above. My guess is that the multi-colored board was shaped in 1977, shortly after a Hawaiian encounter between the Campbell brothers and Col Smith.

The black twin fin shown second from right is another rare Bonzer, given that it has a comparatively pedestrian fin setup. The board was shaped in 1978, according to Buggs’ video. It is the only example of a twin fin Bonzer I have ever seen.

The final board, pictured on the far right in both Instagram posts, is also a trip. It is a collaboration between Hawaiian surfboard label Local Motion and the Campbell Brothers. I believe this board belongs to Buggs now. Once upon a time it was ridden by Hawaiian fixture Tony Moniz, whose children are now well-regarded pros in their own right.

I was able to find earlier pictures of the Local Motion Bonzer on an old site belonging to Kristopher Tom, who currently runs The Vintage Surfboard. You can find the original pictures here.

Last but not least, you can contribute to Leeanne Ericson’s medical fund here.

Vintage Board Price Checks Featuring 80s T&C Surfboards

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a quick check-in on the market for 1980s boards, many of which feature the bright colors and loud graphics that came to define the decade. Trying to find information on fair prices for boards can be a frustrating experience. By referencing some recent eBay sales, including examples of some 80s T&C surfboards, the hope is this post can help collect useful information on board prices.

Board #1: 1981 Town & Country Twin Fin (eBay Link). Winning Bid: $495.00

This board is pictured above (photo via the eBay listing). The board is in good condition, but it has some obvious flaws, including sun damage on the bottom, and some obvious ding repairs. This next part is pure speculation, but I believe the paint job, while recognizable as an 80s design, is less coveted than some more over the top examples. Nonetheless, the closing price says it all. Vintage T&C 80s surfboards remain incredibly popular among collectors.

Board #2: 1983 Town & Country Thruster (eBay Link). Winning Bid: $285.00

I was a little surprised that the price on Board #2 came in so far below Board #1. Board #2 has a cool spray job on the deck and then a bright pink color on the bottom. Unfortunately, Board #2 features a huge piece of Gorilla Grip traction covering a good chunk of the deck. You can also see a bunch of small dings covering the bottom of the board. I tend to think this is at the lower price range for T&C 80s surfboards.

Board #3: 1980s Town & Country Quad Fin (eBay Link). Winning Bid: $202.50

While Board #3 is the cheapest of the vintage 1980s T&C surfboards covered in the post, I think it’s a pretty fair price. First, the board is pretty faded, and there are multiple spots on the deck. Considering that T&Cs are coveted for their graphics, anything that will compromise the visual aspects of the board are likely to mean a discount in price. Board #3 never had a statement paint job to begin with, either.

Board #4: 1980s Local Motion 2+1 (eBay Link). Winning Bid: $620.00

In general, I would say Local Motion boards are not as coveted as their Town & Country counterparts. I think Board #4 is an example of the fact that graphics and condition can often be the most important variables when considering the end price. The board has a beautiful paint job; the only reason I am not including a picture here is because I have already used many of eBay seller cashjack‘s photos in previous posts. Please click through to the listing! There are two other interesting aspects about this board: first, it originally sold for $511 about a month ago, and when the original buyer didn’t want to pay shipping to Hawaii, the board was re-listed on eBay. I can’t say if the price increase has anything to do with market trends or just randomness. Second, unless it’s a typo on the listing, the board is 5’0″ x 17″ x 2-1/2″, which is quite small. If these measurements are correct, then I suspect most buyers are looking at the board as a wall hanger.

Board #5: 1980s Local Motion Single Fin (eBay Link). Current Bid: $480.00

I saved the best for last. Board #5 is also being sold by cashjack. You must click through to the listing and check out the pink and purple checker spray job on this bad boy. There are still three days left in the auction, but the price is already hovering just below $500. I would expect this board to eclipse the price set by Board #4. Again, I think this is a testament to how important visuals are with these boards, given that Town & Country is a more coveted brand than Local Motion (generally speaking, of course).

I hope this was a helpful snapshot at the state of the market for vintage surfboards from the 1980s. As always, if you have more info or context, please give me a shout!