Shred Sledz Social Media Roundup (June 12)

Greetings, Shredderz! As always, here’s a collection of some of the coolest boards I’ve seen floating around online as of late.

@Yater

A post shared by Robert Stassi (@robertstassi) on

How cool is this thing?! Yater was the subject of my most recent post, but I might like the board above even more. I can’t be for sure, but it looks to have a bit of a vee bottom. The outline of this board is very reminiscent of some Liddle and Andreini hulls. The fin — both its rake and its placement — reminds me of Liddle’s boards. The overall outline is reminiscent of Andreini’s Vaquero model.

Hull aficionado Kirk Putnam has an excellent pic on his blog that traces the lineage of Andreini and Liddle’s shapes back to George Greenough. I’ve added the picture below. Liddle’s board is at top, and the next two are Andreini Vaqueros. The fourth board from the top is a Surfboards Hawaii vee bottom shaped by John Price, and the board at the bottom is a Midget Farrelly stringerless vee bottom with a Greenough logo. I had been aware of Greenough’s influence on Andreini and Liddle, but had no idea that Yater had tried out some of these shapes as well. Andreini has made no secret of his admiration of Yater, and it’s cool to see a shape that combines the Greenough school of displacement hulls, and Yater’s more traditional side of California board building.

Kirk Putnam Hulls
A partial shot of Kirk Putnam’s quiver. Pic via kp’s round up

For more on the subject, I urge you to check out Putnam’s blog. If you’re prone to quiver jealousy, though, his Instagram feed might push you over the edge!

 

Lopez’s boards for Lightning Bolt are by far the most collectible, but it seems like there’s a growing interest in some of his more obscure shapes. Pictured above is an extra clean example of Lopez’s signature model that he produced for Hansen in the late 1960s. What’s interesting about that board is that it actually featured two different logos. There’s an example of a different Hansen / Lopez board that was recently sold on eBay. It has the alternate logo, which I have reproduced below.

Hansen Gerry Lopez Logo Shred Sledz
Note the different logos in the two Hansen / Lopez boards. The first one says “By Gerry Lopez”, and the second has “Designed By Gerry Lopez.” In addition, you’ll notice the Hansen logos themselves are very different. Pic via eBay

 

Bird Huffman is a San Diego fixture. He runs Bird’s Surf Shed, where he oversees an ungodly stash of vintage boards. Here Bird has come across two awesome early examples of boards from two separate San Diego craftsmen: Skip Frye and Steve Lis. Make sure you click through all the pictures in the gallery above. The Frye is very similar to the Select Surf Shop single fin I posted about recently, down to the glassed on wooden fin. I love the Frye wings logo towards the tail — never seen that placement before.

Skip Frye 1970s Select Surf Shop Single Fin 6'10"12.jpg
Skip Frye Single Fin with Select Surf Shop laminate. Look at the sharp wings in the tail. Pic via Craigslist

The Lis board is a funky shape, given that it’s a wing pin single fin, and Lis is best known for his fish designs. Make sure you follow Bird on Instagram, as he has been posting updates on the Lis board as he gets them!

 

Just A Country Kid: Wayne Lynch, Aussie Soul Surfer (Part I)

Shred Sledz might have its roots firmly in the California tradition of surf history and culture, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have any love for our friends across the pond. After all, who doesn’t love Australia? The accents are charming, the waves are great, and most importantly, Australia boasts a former prime minister who has skulled a beer (chugged, for you seppos) to a standing ovation at a cricket match not once but twice.

But I digress.

This post is a deeper look at the various surfboard shapes of Australian legend Wayne Lynch, one of the most influential surfers to have ever lived. This is Part I in a series.

 

I. Transition Era, Shortboard Revolution, and the Involvement School

It is hard to overstate Lynch’s impact on the sport. Surfer Magazine lists Lynch as the #17 most influential surfer of all time. For more on Lynch, I recommend the excellent entries from the Encyclopedia of Surfing and SurfResearch.com.au. Lynch, like his contemporaries, started off with longboards that were typical of the early to mid 1960s:

October 6th 1966 Lorne Point #waynelynch pic by #barriesutherland

A post shared by Wayne Lynch (@waynelynchsurfboards) on

Shortly after, though, Lynch would play a critical role in bringing about the Transition Era and the shortboard revolution, thanks to his radical surfing and equally revolutionary equipment. Many regard Paul Witzig‘s seminal 1969 surf film “Evolution” as Lynch’s coming out party.

Continue reading “Just A Country Kid: Wayne Lynch, Aussie Soul Surfer (Part I)”

Shred Sledz Social Media Roundup (3/22)

Greetings, Shredderz! Here is the latest in vintage surfboard news from the far reaches of the interwebs, collected all in one place.

Dick Brewer, Sam Hawk and Owl Chapman. 3 names that means so much to our surfing community. Just legends!

A post shared by Vintage Surfboards (@luisrealcollection) on

Luis Real is the owner of North Shore Surf Shop on Oahu. He is also the owner an extensive collection of vintage surfboards that has been known to bring grown men to tears. He posts a lot of incredible stuff on Instagram and on the Vintage Surfboard Collectors group on Facebook. This post above is a rad picture of a rare Dick Brewer logo that features Sam Hawk and Owl Chapman as well. Note that in the top portion of the pic, Sam Hawk is on the left, Owl Chapman is in the middle, and Brewer himself is to the right.

Today’s post features some tasty Bonzer content for all you alternative surf craft fans. Check out this Shane Bonzer shaped by none other than Simon Anderson! This is a cool look at one of Anderson’s earlier experiments with a tri-fun setup before he invented the proper thruster and revolutionized surfboard designs forever. Note that the owner of the account above is none other than Duncan Campbell, brother of Malcolm and one of the co-founders of Campbell Bros.

I'll take the brown one

A post shared by Joel_tudor (@joeljitsu) on

Your last Bonzer related post of the day comes from none other than Joel Tudor. Check out the comments in the thread where Tudor and Malcolm Campbell are discussing how Joel is going to take that thing down from the rafters and have the outlined copied so he can make a repro. Check out the fin placement on the board on the right — just like the Campbell Bros recommend. Love the little “Bonzer Vehicles” logos you can see next to the side bites, not to mention the funky double concave and the super thinned out tails.

Look at this beautiful example of a Steve Lis fish! And check out those dimensions: at 5’2″ x 20 3/4″ x 2 1/2″ it’s not hard to see the kneeboarding influence. You can barely see a little logo on the bottom of the board towards the top.

Presents Expression Session 1

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Surfboards and Coffee (looks like their website isn’t quite ready for primetime yet) is a group of surfboard collectors in LA that host regular meetups to compare boards and ingest some caffeine. If I lived in that lovely City of Angels I’d like to think I’d be a regular, but alas Shred Sledz HQ isn’t moving from the Bay Area any time soon. Anyway, check them out on Instagram (and how about the spray job on that Stussy!)

Last but not least, Marc Andreini took to Facebook to explain some of the backstory behind his famous Vaquero design. The board on the right is an early predecessor of the Vaquero — then called the “365”, because Andreini and co found they could surf the board nearly every day of the year — from 1974.

Santa Barbara Throwback: White Owl Surfboards

Shred Sledz is a one-man operation, and sometimes, that means it can be hard work finding dope vintage sleds and sharing them with you all. (Sadly, one-man operation is a term that can be used to describe both Shred Sledz’s editorial staff as well as its entire reader base, but I digress.)

Part of what makes my job fun is stumbling across well-camouflaged nuggets, like this board here on Craigslist. It’s described as a “Vintage Surfboard by Bradley and White”, and while this is correct, this board is actually an old school White Owl noserider.

I’ve written up White Owl before. My interest in the brand is solely thanks to Marc Andreini, who grew up surfing White Owl boards. Since then, Andreini has begun shaping boards under the resurrected White Owl brand, going as far as to create a special 50th Anniversary board back in 2011, which you can read about on his blog. (One of these 50th Anniversary boards is up for sale on Craigslist, if you’re interested.)

If I had to guess – and I’m no expert – this particular White Owl board is from sometime in the 1960s. The logo on this board reads “Hand crafted by Bradley and White at Santa Barbara.” Stoked-n-Board doesn’t even show this logo on their page for White Owl. However, Andreini’s 50th anniversary boards clearly copy this unique text layout, as you can see here. I would also say the outline of the board looks like a pig, given that the wide point is behind center and the nose looks pulled in. More pics would help, though.

The board is listed for $400. That seems extremely fair if the bottom is in as good shape as the deck, but that’s not always a guarantee. The listing indicates the board is watertight right now, which is always a good sign.

Check it out on Craigslist here.

White Owl Surfboards Longboard

Here at Shred Sledz HQ we have a fine appreciation for all things surfboard-related. But all parents have their favorites, even if they’re not allowed to say it.

Luckily, Shred Sledz’s editorial staff / sole founder / janitor has no such compunction when it comes to political correctness. Marc Andreini is one of our favorite shapers, and that’s because he’s in his sixties and still rips, shapes rad boards, and is an all-around nice guy.

This board isn’t an Andreini, per se, but it looks to be an older White Owl board. White Owl is a venerable California brand, and Andreini has helped resurrect the marque in recent years. Once upon a time, a young Marc Andreini was a White Owl team rider himself, and the brand seems to hold a special place in his heart.

This thing is certainly boasting its fair share of battle scars, but it’s cool to see what appears to be an older White Owl, and not one of the newer ones shaped by Andreini (which are also extremely rad). The board doesn’t come with a fin, but at least it’s water tight. Buy it now is $650. It’s kind of steep if you ask me, considering the extensive repairs that have been made. I’ve spared Shred Sledz readerz the pain of having to look at all the dings that have been patched up over the years on this board, but you can see all the gory details on the original eBay listing.

Peep it on eBay, found here.

Andreini via McTavish

It’s a day ending in ‘y’, so it must be time to celebrate the legend that is Marc Andreini at Shred Sledz HQ. I came across this sweet-looking vehicle, which can be found on Craigslist in Los Angeles.

The poster describes it as a “McVee” shape, which I have never seen before from Andreini. I’m guessing the name is a portmanteau that refers to the vee bottom of the board, famously invented by Aussie shaper Bob McTavish during the shortboard revolution. The dims are 8’8″ x 22.75″ x 3″, and I imagine this thing has got a ton of paddling power. I’ve always wanted to try one of these vee bottom boards to see how they turn, and I guess I’ll just have to wait my chance.

$850 takes the board (poster claims it has only been surfed twice, and it certainly looks shiny in all the pics). Find it here.