Morey-Pope Camel

Greetings, Shredderz! Here at Shred Sledz HQ we are big fans of the great Tom Morey. I’ve written up a number of Morey-Pope boards before, including a few different Camel variants, including the 3/4 Camel, the Sopwith Camel and the Camel Mini-Pepper. The Morey-Pope label, with its experimental designs and out there branding, is clearly the product of Tom Morey’s prolific and eccentric mind. Today we will be taking a peek at a cool Morey-Pope Camel — no crazy model names here, I’m afraid — that is currently listed for sale on Craigslist in San Diego. You can find a link to the Craigslist listing here.

The Morey-Pope Camel pictured above measures in at 7’0″ x 20 1/2″ x 3 5/8″. I’m guessing the Morey-Pope Camel surfboard was made in 1968 or 1969, but I can’t be sure.

I’ve said it before but it bears repeating: I love the little details on the Morey-Pope surfboards, particularly the small labels on the bottom near the fin box. As you can see there’s a script “Morey-Pope & Company” label running parallel to the box — W.A.V.E. Set, of course, which was invented by Morey — and then a number towards the tail. The Craigslist board is #352. Sadly, I don’t know anything about the numbering on Morey-Pope boards, but if you have more details please do drop me a line.

Last but certainly not least, the seller included an incredible 1969 ad for the Morey-Pope Camel which you can see above. Definitely click to enlarge — it is well worth a closer read. This ad goes into some detail on the different variants of the Camel, including the Sopwith Camel, the aforementioned 3/4 Camel, the King Camel (which I had never heard of before), and the Camel Gun. The board pictured above is a Camel Gun example. You can see the Craigslist board has a nearly identical circular patch near the center on the deck. In addition, the Camel Gun has a far more pulled in nose and tail, per the description on the ad.

The ad reminds me of everything I love so much about Morey-Pope, and by extension, Tom Morey. It’s insane to think that this ad is fifty years old. Yet before the proper shortboard had been invented Morey was thinking far ahead of the surfboard industry on things like measuring the volume of boards. The ad is an absolute trip, whether it’s the bonkers copy — can someone explain Pantographic Scaling to me? — or the sheer density of information contained within a two page spread. It gives you a small idea of what must have been going through Morey’s hyperactive mind during this particularly open-minded period of surfboard design in the late Sixties.

See below for another Morey-Pope Camel ad I posted a while back. And if you’re interested in the Camel gun featured above, check out the listing here.

Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a quick hit for you, but I’d like to think it’s a good one. The board pictured here — again, a big shout out to those Craigslist sellers out there who go above and beyond with their pics — is a Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel model. I’ve written about Tom Morey many times, and I’m not planning on stopping any time soon. Morey is one of the rare individuals who covers both quality and quantity with his inventions, which include removable fins, traction and the Boogie board, to name a few. For you more traditional types, Morey has a math degree from USC and worked as an engineer for Douglas Aircraft before letting his brain loose in the direction of surfcraft. Now that is a resume.

There’s so much of Morey’s career that deserves our attention, but I personally have a soft spot for the shapes he created under the Morey-Pope Surfboards label, alongside Karl Pope. Morey-Pope had a number of out there designs, befitting the famously eccentric Morey (who later went by “Y”, Prince style). The short-lived label released a number of variants on the Morey Pope Camel model. While I believe the standard Camel and the Sopwith Campel were most common, I’ve written up a Mini-Pepper and a 3/4 Camel (no, I’m not making up those names.)

There’s currently a very cool Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel that is listed for sale on Craigslist in Orange County. You can find the listing here. The seller is hoping for a trade, and you gotta love the pre-emptive notice that he’s not looking to swap for any waterlogged D-fins. My man is fighting the good fight on Craigslist, that’s for sure!

You can click the photos above to enlarge. According to the seller, the board measures in at 7’3″ x 22″, and it was likely shaped in either 1968 or 1969 during the height of the Transition Era.

I’m unclear on whether or not the Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel is considered a proper displacement hull. The board’s dimensions and the pics above — notably, the S-Deck and the convex bottom — suggest that it is, but that’s a guess. I hopped over to the Encyclopedia of Surfing to read their entry on the displacement hull but wasn’t able to find anything conclusive.

You can check out the Craigslist post here. As a bonus, check out the sweet Morey-Pope stringerless board that Buggs posted below.

Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper

Greetings, Shredderz! As long time readers may know by now, Morey Pope is a Shred Sledz favorite. Tom Morey boasts one of the most incredible resumes in surf history. Morey’s fertile mind helped bring along advancements like hollow surfboards, removable fins, and yes, Boogie Boards. The Morey Pope label was a short-lived collaboration with Karl Pope (Pope later on went to work on collapsible surfboards) that had its heyday during the Transition Era of the late Sixties. And while Morey Pope boards are known for being innovative, a lot of the reason why I like them is because they happen to be really cool.

Case in point is a very cool Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper that’s currently listed for sale on eBay. You can find a link to the listing here. All pics in the post are via the eBay listing. The board is being sold by Chubby Surf — I recommend checking out their website as well, as they sell some cool vintage surfboards at reasonable prices.

As is generally the case with Morey Pope boards, the details on this one are killer. I love the giant Hawaii text on the deck. There look to be some unusually shaped volan patches on both sides of the board as well, and I’m guessing this is a largely aesthetic piece. You’ll also notice the cool small Morey Pope laminate running along the fin box — a W.A.V.E. Set box and matching fin, of course — along with a small serial number towards the tail.

I have never seen a Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper before. I thought I had made a neat little discovery a few weeks back when I stumbled across a Morey Pope 3/4 Camel, which I wrote up here. I have no idea whether there’s a Morey Pope Camel Pepper, as the name of the Mini Pepper suggests. Either way, the Camel Mini Pepper has a pretty racy outline for the Transition Era, and it’s a lot more gun-like than what I associate with a “standard” Morey Pope Camel design. See below for an example of a Sopwith Camel, which has a lot of hull-like aspects to it.

The eBay auction for the Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper ends on Monday. Bidding is currently at a mere $105, which is worth it for the fin alone! Once again check out the listing here, and there are more cool boards listed on Chubby Surf’s website.

Morey Pope 3/4 Camel: Transition Era Displacement Hull

Greetings, Shredderz! It’s no secret that displacement hulls have enjoyed a resurgence lately, thanks to shapers like Greg Liddle, Marc Andreini and many others. But today’s example is a hull from one of the most interesting and influential figures in the history of surfcraft: Tom Morey. Morey Pope was the collaboration between Tom Morey and Karl Pope. The brand was responsible for some of the most fascinating and coveted designs during the Transition Era. Morey Pope’s line of Camel branded shortboards represents some of its most recognizable creations. While I’ve seen various Morey Pope Camel shapes before, including the Sopwith Camel, and then what a seller claimed to be a predecessor of the Camel line, I can’t find any detailed info on the differences between the various Camel models.

The reason behind this post, however, is an unusual Morey Pope board that I have never seen before: The 3/4 Camel. I’m not sure what the name means, but I’m guessing it might be a smaller version of the standard Camel. The board featured in this post is listed for sale on Craigslist in New Jersey, and as of the time the post was written, it was still for sale. You can find the Craigslist post here.

Morey Pope 3:4 Camel Displacement Hull Bottom.jpg
Check out that classic hull bottom!

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has a distinctive displacement hull bottom, which can be seen above. It also looks like the 3/4 Camel is stringerless (or at least, this example is).

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has so many of the elements that I love about Morey’s Transition Era boards. The outline has a bunch of unusual things going on. The wide point is pushed way back of center, and I’m not quite sure how to describe the tail. From the pic in the lower right, it looks like there’s a bunch of vee in the tail as well. There’s also a W.A.V.E. Set fin — another one of mad scientist Morey’s inventions, of course.

One of the more underrated aspects of the Morey Pope boards are the amazing logos. I love the little rainbow laminate running the length of the fin box, and the serial number sticker is a great touch, too. Finally, the deck logo, featured at the top of the post, is so clean and simple and still looks modern nearly fifty years after the board was probably shaped.

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel measures in at 7’6″, but I don’t have any other information on the other dimensions. The seller is asking $400 for the board. I think this is reasonable, given how unusual the board is, but pricing vintage surfboards is always tricky.

Anyway, if you’re interested in purchasing this bad boy, check out the Craigslist post here.