Morey Pope 3/4 Camel: Transition Era Displacement Hull

Greetings, Shredderz! It’s no secret that displacement hulls have enjoyed a resurgence lately, thanks to shapers like Greg Liddle, Marc Andreini and many others. But today’s example is a hull from one of the most interesting and influential figures in the history of surfcraft: Tom Morey. Morey Pope was the collaboration between Tom Morey and Karl Pope. The brand was responsible for some of the most fascinating and coveted designs during the Transition Era. Morey Pope’s line of Camel branded shortboards represents some of its most recognizable creations. While I’ve seen various Morey Pope Camel shapes before, including the Sopwith Camel, and then what a seller claimed to be a predecessor of the Camel line, I can’t find any detailed info on the differences between the various Camel models.

The reason behind this post, however, is an unusual Morey Pope board that I have never seen before: The 3/4 Camel. I’m not sure what the name means, but I’m guessing it might be a smaller version of the standard Camel. The board featured in this post is listed for sale on Craigslist in New Jersey, and as of the time the post was written, it was still for sale. You can find the Craigslist post here.

Morey Pope 3:4 Camel Displacement Hull Bottom.jpg
Check out that classic hull bottom!

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has a distinctive displacement hull bottom, which can be seen above. It also looks like the 3/4 Camel is stringerless (or at least, this example is).

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has so many of the elements that I love about Morey’s Transition Era boards. The outline has a bunch of unusual things going on. The wide point is pushed way back of center, and I’m not quite sure how to describe the tail. From the pic in the lower right, it looks like there’s a bunch of vee in the tail as well. There’s also a W.A.V.E. Set fin — another one of mad scientist Morey’s inventions, of course.

One of the more underrated aspects of the Morey Pope boards are the amazing logos. I love the little rainbow laminate running the length of the fin box, and the serial number sticker is a great touch, too. Finally, the deck logo, featured at the top of the post, is so clean and simple and still looks modern nearly fifty years after the board was probably shaped.

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel measures in at 7’6″, but I don’t have any other information on the other dimensions. The seller is asking $400 for the board. I think this is reasonable, given how unusual the board is, but pricing vintage surfboards is always tricky.

Anyway, if you’re interested in purchasing this bad boy, check out the Craigslist post here.