Weekend Grab Bag: January Jump Off

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have the inaugural Weekend Grab Bag post for the decade. We’ve got some sweet boards for you today, including a clean Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel. Keep scrolling for a selection of sledz that are currently listed for sale online.

Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel (Craigslist LA)

I’ve covered the many iterations of the Morey-Pope Camel before: the Camel Mini-Pepper, the 3/4 Camel, and the Sopwith Camel. Whenever I look at Morey-Pope boards I am reminded of Tom Morey’s incredible creativity. Anyway, this is just a “regular” Morey-Pope Camel. It’s one of the cleaner ones I have seen, and it has a beautiful resin pin line, too. The pics give you a great idea of the convex hull on the board.

Custom 9’6″ Yater Spoon (Craigslist Santa Barbara)

The Yater Spoon is an unimpeachable classic. If it’s not your kind of deal, I’m not sure we’re meant to be friends. This Spoon has some unique touches. First, the seller claims the board was hand shaped by Renny himself, which is notable given that the newer Spoons are all apparently shaped with the help of shaping machines. Second, as you can see in the photos above, it also sports a very cool wooden fin, and what looks to be a wooden wedge stringer. There are some other neat boards listed on the ad, including an awesome Yater balsa board, which has since sold.

10’7.5″ Bob Pearson Gun (Craigslist San Diego)

The listing claims this Pearson Arrow surfboard was shaped for legendary Santa Cruz / Mavericks charger Jay Moriarity, who is responsible for one of the most iconic surf images from the Nineties. If you look up images of Moriarity’s infamous wipeout you’ll see he’s surfing a board with the same airbrush. I doubt this is the board, but it’s still very, very cool. Seller claims it was shaped in 1997.

Odds and Ends

  1. 9’0″ Epoxy Donald Takayama “In The Pink” Model from 2012 (Craigslist San Diego)
    • Anecdotally, it seems like Takayama boards are creeping up in prices. This one is $750, looks to be in pretty good shape, and has some unusual epoxy laminates I haven’t seen before.
  2. Aipa / T&C Twin Fin w/Pottz Airbrush (eBay)
    • The Pottz airbrush has to be one of the most iconic sprays ever. Even better, this stick was shaped by Ben Aipa. Not cheap but also not hard to see why.
  3. 9’0″ Surfboards Makaha 1960s Longboard, possibly shaped by Ben Aipa (eBay)
    • Speaking of Ben Aipa, he shaped some boards under the Surfboards Makaha label during the earlier part of his career. There’s no signature so your guess is as good as mine, but at $300 it’s pretty cheap (local pickup in Hawaii required).
  4. Eighties Simon Anderson / Energy Surfboards Thruster (Craigslist San Diego)
    • I think this one is a tad pricey but I always love seeing these early Simon Anderson thrusters. Anderson employed other shapers, so I can’t say it’s one of his hand shapes, but it’s still a cool relic from the early days of one of the most influential surfboard designs ever.

Morey-Pope Camel

Greetings, Shredderz! Here at Shred Sledz HQ we are big fans of the great Tom Morey. I’ve written up a number of Morey-Pope boards before, including a few different Camel variants, including the 3/4 Camel, the Sopwith Camel and the Camel Mini-Pepper. The Morey-Pope label, with its experimental designs and out there branding, is clearly the product of Tom Morey’s prolific and eccentric mind. Today we will be taking a peek at a cool Morey-Pope Camel — no crazy model names here, I’m afraid — that is currently listed for sale on Craigslist in San Diego. You can find a link to the Craigslist listing here.

The Morey-Pope Camel pictured above measures in at 7’0″ x 20 1/2″ x 3 5/8″. I’m guessing the Morey-Pope Camel surfboard was made in 1968 or 1969, but I can’t be sure.

I’ve said it before but it bears repeating: I love the little details on the Morey-Pope surfboards, particularly the small labels on the bottom near the fin box. As you can see there’s a script “Morey-Pope & Company” label running parallel to the box — W.A.V.E. Set, of course, which was invented by Morey — and then a number towards the tail. The Craigslist board is #352. Sadly, I don’t know anything about the numbering on Morey-Pope boards, but if you have more details please do drop me a line.

Last but certainly not least, the seller included an incredible 1969 ad for the Morey-Pope Camel which you can see above. Definitely click to enlarge — it is well worth a closer read. This ad goes into some detail on the different variants of the Camel, including the Sopwith Camel, the aforementioned 3/4 Camel, the King Camel (which I had never heard of before), and the Camel Gun. The board pictured above is a Camel Gun example. You can see the Craigslist board has a nearly identical circular patch near the center on the deck. In addition, the Camel Gun has a far more pulled in nose and tail, per the description on the ad.

The ad reminds me of everything I love so much about Morey-Pope, and by extension, Tom Morey. It’s insane to think that this ad is fifty years old. Yet before the proper shortboard had been invented Morey was thinking far ahead of the surfboard industry on things like measuring the volume of boards. The ad is an absolute trip, whether it’s the bonkers copy — can someone explain Pantographic Scaling to me? — or the sheer density of information contained within a two page spread. It gives you a small idea of what must have been going through Morey’s hyperactive mind during this particularly open-minded period of surfboard design in the late Sixties.

See below for another Morey-Pope Camel ad I posted a while back. And if you’re interested in the Camel gun featured above, check out the listing here.

1970 Morey-Pope Ad: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! My summer vacation is finally coming to a close. Beginning next Thursday Sagas of Shred will pick up where it left off, featuring vintage surf ads scanned from my collection of vintage magazines. (Side bar: I’m still looking for Surfer Magazine issues from the Sixties and Seventies, so get in touch if you’re in California and you have some up for grabs!) In the meantime the Sagas of Shred series is featuring some rad vintage surf ads that I have found elsewhere on the internet. Today we have a ridiculous spread courtesy of Morey-Pope Surfboards, coming on the heels of my writeup of a cool Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel that was recently listed for sale. Even better, the ad originally appeared on the peerless surfresearch.com.au. Seriously — please check out surfresearch.com.au. It is nothing short of a digital surf history museum. Don’t let the site’s distinct Web 1.0 vibe scare you off. It is an absolute treasure trove, filled with gems like the Morey-Pope ad pictured above.

The ad is actually a two page spread that ran in a 1970 issue of Surfer Magazine. I have included both photos above, which you can click to enlarge. There is a lot going on. You could even argue it’s too much, but to me, it’s a perfect expression of the limitless creativity that fueled Tom Morey’s career.

As a bonus, check out another Morey-Pope ad I found on Instagram below. I love the super colorful slipcheck designs on these MP boards.

Thanks for reading and we hope to see you next Thursday evening for more Sagas of Shred!

Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have a quick hit for you, but I’d like to think it’s a good one. The board pictured here — again, a big shout out to those Craigslist sellers out there who go above and beyond with their pics — is a Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel model. I’ve written about Tom Morey many times, and I’m not planning on stopping any time soon. Morey is one of the rare individuals who covers both quality and quantity with his inventions, which include removable fins, traction and the Boogie board, to name a few. For you more traditional types, Morey has a math degree from USC and worked as an engineer for Douglas Aircraft before letting his brain loose in the direction of surfcraft. Now that is a resume.

There’s so much of Morey’s career that deserves our attention, but I personally have a soft spot for the shapes he created under the Morey-Pope Surfboards label, alongside Karl Pope. Morey-Pope had a number of out there designs, befitting the famously eccentric Morey (who later went by “Y”, Prince style). The short-lived label released a number of variants on the Morey Pope Camel model. While I believe the standard Camel and the Sopwith Campel were most common, I’ve written up a Mini-Pepper and a 3/4 Camel (no, I’m not making up those names.)

There’s currently a very cool Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel that is listed for sale on Craigslist in Orange County. You can find the listing here. The seller is hoping for a trade, and you gotta love the pre-emptive notice that he’s not looking to swap for any waterlogged D-fins. My man is fighting the good fight on Craigslist, that’s for sure!

You can click the photos above to enlarge. According to the seller, the board measures in at 7’3″ x 22″, and it was likely shaped in either 1968 or 1969 during the height of the Transition Era.

I’m unclear on whether or not the Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel is considered a proper displacement hull. The board’s dimensions and the pics above — notably, the S-Deck and the convex bottom — suggest that it is, but that’s a guess. I hopped over to the Encyclopedia of Surfing to read their entry on the displacement hull but wasn’t able to find anything conclusive.

You can check out the Craigslist post here. As a bonus, check out the sweet Morey-Pope stringerless board that Buggs posted below.

July Flyin’ By: Social Media Roundup

Greetings, Shredderz! For those of you in the Northern Hemisphere, it’s crazy to think that summer is almost behind us already. But while the days are still long and the weather is warm I thought it’d be great to review some of the better surf-related social media that has crossed my desk recently. Without any further ado, here are some choice cuts for you to enjoy

Tyler Warren is a talented surfer and shaper, and here at Shred HQ we’re big fans of his work. In fact, Warren got a brief shout out in the last Sagas of Shred entry for a beautiful single fin he crafted for Dane Gudauskas. This time we have Warren behind the controls of an original Sixties Hobie Phil Edwards Model. He claims it’s not an easy board to surf, but you wouldn’t necessarily know that from watching the clip above. It’s always nice to see a historically significant board still get wet every now and then.

Gordon & Smith posted this really cool mini-gallery of a reproduction of a vintage flex tail egg. I love the comparison between the newer board and the original. It’s unclear to me if Skip Frye himself shaped the original egg, but needless to say, his involvement with providing some design pointers makes the end product even cooler. Very stoked for the owner who counts both of these sleds among his collection!

It’s practically a rule at this point: any Social Media Roundup entry is likely to feature at least one board that Luis Real has added to his collection. Luis is a machine and I mean that in the nicest possible way! Anyway, he somehow managed to find this stunning Seventies Tom Parrish shaped single fin. The artwork and the colors on this thing are nothing short of amazing. You can go see it at the North Shore Surf Shop in Haleiwa if you’re so inclined, along with the rest of Luis’ ridiculous quiver.

I’ve been meaning to write a longer post on the infamous Morey-Pope Blue Machine, but it’s one of the many items on my to do list that only seems to collect dust. Until I saw the post above, I didn’t realize that Morey-Pope had also made a green version of the Blue Machine. The board belongs to Buggs, another prolific collector whose sticks have made it into these pages over the years.

Look, I don’t make the rules here, I just follow them. And any time I see a sick Stussy shape pop up on the Gram, well, you know it’ll be resurfacing here. I love the boards Stussy made for Russell Surfboards in the Seventies, and this is a really sweet example.

Photo at the top of the page by Jereme Aubertin, featuring Tyler Warren surfing in New Zealand, via Corona.

Weekend Grab Bag: Donald Takayama Scorpion & More

Greetings, Shredderz! By now you should know the drill: it’s the latest edition of the Weekend Grab Bag, where I spotlight some great boards I have seen listed for sale. As always, all of the postings are live as of the time the blog post was published. Onto the fresh batch of vintage sticks, beginning with a Donald Takayama Scorpion in clean condition.

Donald Takayama Scorpion (Craigslist San Diego)

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The Donald Takayama Scorpion just might be one of the most famous models from Takayama’s long and distinguished shaping career. The vast majority of Takayama Scorpions I have seen are the epoxy versions, which were obviously not hand shaped by DT. (For what it’s worth, I borrowed a friend’s epoxy Donald Takayama egg once and absolutely loved it.) The Scorpion featured above is 7’4″ x 22″ x 2 7/8″ and the seller is asking $800. Takayama himself signed the board in pencil on the stringer. I have also heard that some of these later-era DT boards were shaped with the assistance of a shaping machine. I would guess this board is late 90s to early 2000s, given the FCS fin boxes for the side bites. Either way I think this is a nice price for a very cool board.

Vintage Skip Frye Fish (Craigslist San Diego)

Vintage Skip Frye Fish 6'6" .jpg

The seller claims this vintage Skip Frye fish hasn’t been surfed in at least twenty years. As for an exact date, I’m hard pressed to tell you anything. I want to say most Skip Frye fish I see have wooden Gephart keels, but this example has fiberglass ones. Here’s what the seller has to say about the fins: “This board has great fins a modified Keel fin template by JB that is less deep then (sic) a normal keel and rides more loose in the water.” I don’t know who JB is, but I dig the vintage-ish date of the board. It’s 6’6″ long and looks super fun, and the posting has some great pics of the owner surfing it, too. Seller is asking $2,500, which is not cheap, but I have yet to see a bargain on a Skip Frye shape.

90s Hobie Phil Edwards Longboard (Craigslist Orange County)

You can click on any of the photos above to enlarge. I have written up the Hobie Phil Edwards Model a few times, and it remains one of the most classic nose riders ever made. The board you see above was shaped by Phil Edwards, but it’s not a Hobie Phil Edwards Model. For starters, the seller claims the board was shaped in 1995. It also has some interesting details that make it very different from the classic 60s Hobie Phil Edwards Model, such as a triple stringer setup, a wider center stringer, and a different logo. At some point during the 80s or 90s, Hobie also reissued the Phil Edwards Model (with the help of Stewart Surfboards, I believe), that had an imitation foil logo on it, as well as a different outline from the board you see above. So then what exactly is the board above? I’m not sure — it may have even been a custom. The seller refers to it as a Classic Model, but I have never seen that mentioned anywhere. As always, if you have any clues, let me know!

Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker (Craigslist Los Angeles)

Last but not least we have another creation from the mind of Tom Morey, who remains one of surfing’s foremost mad scientists. One of the coolest features found in the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker model is the psychedelic graphic design of the Slipcheck patterns. The McTavish Tracker was designed by Australian shaper Bob McTavish, and it remains one of the standout shapes of the Transition Era. According to surfresearch.com.au, the Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker was created during a trip McTavish took to visit George Greenough in Santa Barbara, and the rest is history. I actually wrote up an earlier Morey Pope McTavish Tracker here. The earlier post features another example of the board and links to some resources with some history behind the groundbreaking shape.

Happy Birthday Herbie Fletcher: Social Media Roundup

Greetings, Shredderz! As 2018 comes to a close I figured I put together one last Social Media Roundup for the year. Even better, it was Herbie Fletcher’s birthday yesterday, which conveniently provides a theme for this post. Check out the photo above of Herbie launching a Jet Ski with an awesome Pottz airbrush design. (Eagle eyed readers may remember that Herbie featured prominently in the last Roundup, but there can’t be too much of a good thing, right?) For anyone who’s read this blog in 2018, I can’t thank you enough. I hope you enjoyed reading Shred Sledz, and more importantly, I hope 2019 has even better vintage surfboard goods for you to enjoy. Now onto the fun stuff…

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Happy 70th Birthday @herbiefletcher Pic bolster

A post shared by Joel_tudor (@joeljitsu) on

Joel Tudor posted this photo of Herbie, which was taken by famed photog Warren Bolster. If you do a bit of digging in the comments, it turns out that this photo was the basis for the Herbie Fletcher Surfboards logo. Dig a comparison shot below.

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Close up of the Herbie Fletcher Surfboards logo. You can clearly see the design is based off the Warren Bolster photo featured in Joel Tudor’s Instagram post above.

 

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Here’s a Greg Liddle inspired 7’10 x 21 x 3.25 displacement hull type surfboard that I hand-shaped  last week designed for North Shore surf. 5 years before I left California for Hawaii, I consistently surfed Malibu in the late Spring, Summer, and early Fall months as my favorite surf spot in California. One of my very favorite surfer’s to watch and surf with there at that time, was Greg Liddle, who was also a board builder and absolutely ripped first and second point on his Displacement Hull creations at Malibu along with his sander, Steve Crieski. When I see the “stubs” that are currently popular, and that many surfers are riding now, I can only think back 50 years ago to Greg and his long lasting influence on my surfing and shaping journey.  For those interested in Hull Displacement ideas, Greg can be reached at his website: gregliddledesigns.com

A post shared by Pat Rawson (@rawsonsurfboard) on

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Here’s two different singlefin flex keels from the 1973 era, that I still have from my South Bay influences from Jeff Ho @therealjeffho These fins were so dynamic, they made the boards we were riding and testing much faster and looser. They were thin and made from solid weave fiberglass. They also had curved bandsaw cuts in them to extenuate flex, and sometimes you could turn them so hard, that pieces would break off the fin during the turn!! Heres @therealjeffho and I together at Bob Milner’s (Robert’s Surfboards) memorial back in February 24,2018. In my opinion: in 1971-74, Jeff was way ahead of the curve over everyone else in advancing board design in our California South Bay area. What I remembered most then was Jeff innovating swallow tails, with flat decks and tucked edge rails, along with progressive flex keel fins.

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Pat Rawson continues to be one of my favorite follows on Instagram. For the longest time I associated Pat with high performance boards made to tackle serious Hawaiian surf, like the sled that enabled Tom Carroll’s infamous under the lip snap at Pipeline. I was pleasantly surprised to read that Rawson spent time surfing Malibu and overlapped with Greg Liddle, during which time Rawson developed an affinity for Greg’s famous displacement hulls. But that’s not all — Rawson’s time in Los Angeles also overlapped with Jeff Ho, the mind behind Zephyr Surfboards.

This is a stunning Morey Pope / Bob McTavish tracker. I love the groovy rainbow slip check on the deck. Transition Era designs don’t get much more classic than this one.

Last but not least Bird’s Surf Shed has a beautiful Natural Progression twin fin with a Bertlemann-esque airbrush on the deck. Love the double logo on this thing.

 

Photo at the top of the page by Denjiro Sato, and originally found via Zak Noyle.

Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper

Greetings, Shredderz! As long time readers may know by now, Morey Pope is a Shred Sledz favorite. Tom Morey boasts one of the most incredible resumes in surf history. Morey’s fertile mind helped bring along advancements like hollow surfboards, removable fins, and yes, Boogie Boards. The Morey Pope label was a short-lived collaboration with Karl Pope (Pope later on went to work on collapsible surfboards) that had its heyday during the Transition Era of the late Sixties. And while Morey Pope boards are known for being innovative, a lot of the reason why I like them is because they happen to be really cool.

Case in point is a very cool Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper that’s currently listed for sale on eBay. You can find a link to the listing here. All pics in the post are via the eBay listing. The board is being sold by Chubby Surf — I recommend checking out their website as well, as they sell some cool vintage surfboards at reasonable prices.

As is generally the case with Morey Pope boards, the details on this one are killer. I love the giant Hawaii text on the deck. There look to be some unusually shaped volan patches on both sides of the board as well, and I’m guessing this is a largely aesthetic piece. You’ll also notice the cool small Morey Pope laminate running along the fin box — a W.A.V.E. Set box and matching fin, of course — along with a small serial number towards the tail.

I have never seen a Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper before. I thought I had made a neat little discovery a few weeks back when I stumbled across a Morey Pope 3/4 Camel, which I wrote up here. I have no idea whether there’s a Morey Pope Camel Pepper, as the name of the Mini Pepper suggests. Either way, the Camel Mini Pepper has a pretty racy outline for the Transition Era, and it’s a lot more gun-like than what I associate with a “standard” Morey Pope Camel design. See below for an example of a Sopwith Camel, which has a lot of hull-like aspects to it.

The eBay auction for the Morey Pope Camel Mini Pepper ends on Monday. Bidding is currently at a mere $105, which is worth it for the fin alone! Once again check out the listing here, and there are more cool boards listed on Chubby Surf’s website.

Morey Pope 3/4 Camel: Transition Era Displacement Hull

Greetings, Shredderz! It’s no secret that displacement hulls have enjoyed a resurgence lately, thanks to shapers like Greg Liddle, Marc Andreini and many others. But today’s example is a hull from one of the most interesting and influential figures in the history of surfcraft: Tom Morey. Morey Pope was the collaboration between Tom Morey and Karl Pope. The brand was responsible for some of the most fascinating and coveted designs during the Transition Era. Morey Pope’s line of Camel branded shortboards represents some of its most recognizable creations. While I’ve seen various Morey Pope Camel shapes before, including the Sopwith Camel, and then what a seller claimed to be a predecessor of the Camel line, I can’t find any detailed info on the differences between the various Camel models.

The reason behind this post, however, is an unusual Morey Pope board that I have never seen before: The 3/4 Camel. I’m not sure what the name means, but I’m guessing it might be a smaller version of the standard Camel. The board featured in this post is listed for sale on Craigslist in New Jersey, and as of the time the post was written, it was still for sale. You can find the Craigslist post here.

Morey Pope 3:4 Camel Displacement Hull Bottom.jpg
Check out that classic hull bottom!

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has a distinctive displacement hull bottom, which can be seen above. It also looks like the 3/4 Camel is stringerless (or at least, this example is).

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has so many of the elements that I love about Morey’s Transition Era boards. The outline has a bunch of unusual things going on. The wide point is pushed way back of center, and I’m not quite sure how to describe the tail. From the pic in the lower right, it looks like there’s a bunch of vee in the tail as well. There’s also a W.A.V.E. Set fin — another one of mad scientist Morey’s inventions, of course.

One of the more underrated aspects of the Morey Pope boards are the amazing logos. I love the little rainbow laminate running the length of the fin box, and the serial number sticker is a great touch, too. Finally, the deck logo, featured at the top of the post, is so clean and simple and still looks modern nearly fifty years after the board was probably shaped.

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel measures in at 7’6″, but I don’t have any other information on the other dimensions. The seller is asking $400 for the board. I think this is reasonable, given how unusual the board is, but pricing vintage surfboards is always tricky.

Anyway, if you’re interested in purchasing this bad boy, check out the Craigslist post here.

Shred Sledz Presents: 4/17 Weekend Grab Bag (Aipa, Hansen, Morey Pope, Hansen)

Back to our regularly scheduled weekend grab bags. Here’s a selection of some cool boards that have caught my eye recently.

Aipa / Surfing’s New Image Sting (Craigslist – Santa Barbara)

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Sadly, there are no bargains to be had here. Seller is asking $2250 out the gate for this Aipa / Surfing’s New Image sting. Shout out to the seller for being clear about the fact this board was shaped by Rick Hamon, and not Ben Aipa himself (see here for an earlier Shred Sledz screed on the topic.) I have never seen that stringer setup before, and the airbrush on the bottom speaks for itself! Deck isn’t perfect but that’s like pointing out a small dent on a gullwing Mercedes. Check out the board here.

Hit the jump below for some more boards, including another Aipa, and some transitional goodness..

Continue reading “Shred Sledz Presents: 4/17 Weekend Grab Bag (Aipa, Hansen, Morey Pope, Hansen)”