Morey Pope 3/4 Camel: Transition Era Displacement Hull

Greetings, Shredderz! It’s no secret that displacement hulls have enjoyed a resurgence lately, thanks to shapers like Greg Liddle, Marc Andreini and many others. But today’s example is a hull from one of the most interesting and influential figures in the history of surfcraft: Tom Morey. Morey Pope was the collaboration between Tom Morey and Karl Pope. The brand was responsible for some of the most fascinating and coveted designs during the Transition Era. Morey Pope’s line of Camel branded shortboards represents some of its most recognizable creations. While I’ve seen various Morey Pope Camel shapes before, including the Sopwith Camel, and then what a seller claimed to be a predecessor of the Camel line, I can’t find any detailed info on the differences between the various Camel models.

The reason behind this post, however, is an unusual Morey Pope board that I have never seen before: The 3/4 Camel. I’m not sure what the name means, but I’m guessing it might be a smaller version of the standard Camel. The board featured in this post is listed for sale on Craigslist in New Jersey, and as of the time the post was written, it was still for sale. You can find the Craigslist post here.

Morey Pope 3:4 Camel Displacement Hull Bottom.jpg
Check out that classic hull bottom!

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has a distinctive displacement hull bottom, which can be seen above. It also looks like the 3/4 Camel is stringerless (or at least, this example is).

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel has so many of the elements that I love about Morey’s Transition Era boards. The outline has a bunch of unusual things going on. The wide point is pushed way back of center, and I’m not quite sure how to describe the tail. From the pic in the lower right, it looks like there’s a bunch of vee in the tail as well. There’s also a W.A.V.E. Set fin — another one of mad scientist Morey’s inventions, of course.

One of the more underrated aspects of the Morey Pope boards are the amazing logos. I love the little rainbow laminate running the length of the fin box, and the serial number sticker is a great touch, too. Finally, the deck logo, featured at the top of the post, is so clean and simple and still looks modern nearly fifty years after the board was probably shaped.

The Morey Pope 3/4 Camel measures in at 7’6″, but I don’t have any other information on the other dimensions. The seller is asking $400 for the board. I think this is reasonable, given how unusual the board is, but pricing vintage surfboards is always tricky.

Anyway, if you’re interested in purchasing this bad boy, check out the Craigslist post here.

Shred Sledz Presents: 4/17 Weekend Grab Bag (Aipa, Hansen, Morey Pope, Hansen)

Back to our regularly scheduled weekend grab bags. Here’s a selection of some cool boards that have caught my eye recently.

Aipa / Surfing’s New Image Sting (Craigslist – Santa Barbara)

00x0x_luXdiHM7EfW_1200x90000i0i_4fYxGkAy67w_1200x90000j0j_lxZ2Gs3odzd_1200x900

Sadly, there are no bargains to be had here. Seller is asking $2250 out the gate for this Aipa / Surfing’s New Image sting. Shout out to the seller for being clear about the fact this board was shaped by Rick Hamon, and not Ben Aipa himself (see here for an earlier Shred Sledz screed on the topic.) I have never seen that stringer setup before, and the airbrush on the bottom speaks for itself! Deck isn’t perfect but that’s like pointing out a small dent on a gullwing Mercedes. Check out the board here.

Hit the jump below for some more boards, including another Aipa, and some transitional goodness..

Continue reading “Shred Sledz Presents: 4/17 Weekend Grab Bag (Aipa, Hansen, Morey Pope, Hansen)”

Shred Sledz Social Media Roundup (3/30)

Greetings, Shredderz! As always, see below for my hand picked selections of some high quality social media.

I’ve been writing about Morey Pope a bit lately, and here’s an incredible find from Buggs, who has one of the dopest surfboard collections known to mankind, and runs SurfboardLine in his free time. This is a balsa Morey Pope board from what looks to be 1966 — see the comments for some more knowledgeable people chiming in with info on this beaut.

My hero renny

A post shared by Joel_tudor (@joeljitsu) on

Joel Tudor has been posting a lot of quality vintage content on his Instagram lately. This is a picture of Renny Yater. I’d guess late 1950s or early 1960s, but don’t quote me on that. Either way, it is one classic picture of one classic dude (and posted by another!)

Continue reading “Shred Sledz Social Media Roundup (3/30)”

Shred Sledz Presents: 3/26 Weekend Grab Bag (Morey-Pope, Chuck Dent, Yater)

Greetings, Shredderz! I hope your weekend was chock full of uncrowded lineups and good times. As always, here is a smattering of a few boards that caught my attention over the past week.

Various Morey Pope Boards on Craigslist

First up is an orange Morey Pope mini-gun. It’s in the 7′ range and it’s on sale for $650 on Craigslist in Carlsbad, right near San Diego. Check out the logo on that thing, too — I couldn’t find a similar one on either Stoked-n-Board or Stanley’s.  The outline is very reminiscent of a Yater Pocket Rocket. I found a Swaylocks thread detailing a 1969 (estimated) Morey Pope “Power Dude” model, which also looks extremely similar to the orange board. At the risk of sounding financially irresponsible, I don’t think $650 is that crazy. Then again, Mrs. Shred Sledz likely has a very different conclusion, so take that with a grain of salt…

The other Morey Pope board for sale is the white board pictured in the gallery above. It can be found on Craigslist in Santa Barbara, where the seller is asking a cool $1K. The poster claims it is likely an early predecessor to the Camel model. Check out the very clear numbering, too.

If you’re still not satisfied with the amount of Transition Era weirdness served up by these two boards, here are yet two more Morey Pope sticks for sale: first is a hollow W.A.V.E board, going for $500; and then a Morey Pope McTavish tracker, also $500, which I wrote about previously. They’re being sold by the same collector so this could be an attractive package deal.

Continue reading “Shred Sledz Presents: 3/26 Weekend Grab Bag (Morey-Pope, Chuck Dent, Yater)”

Morey-Pope: A Study in Contrasts

Morey-Pope is a brand I have written about a few times before, and I don’t think I’ll ever get tired of it. Morey Pope occupies a funky little corner of surf history. Co-founder Tom Morey, who apparently now goes by the Prince-esque name “Y”, might be one of the most innovative and interesting people in the history of surfing, having invented the bodyboard and Slipcheck traction, among others.

Anyway, right now there are two neat Morey-Pope boards for sale, neither of which is priced in the stratosphere. Both boards aren’t perfect by any means, but the Shred Sledz motto might as well be “it never hurts to look.”

The first board can be found on the excellent Instagram account Red Dot Goods. They are first rate purveyors of various pieces of surf nostalgia, including some rad boards. They have a Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel model up for sale, which you can see in the pic below. $750 doesn’t sound insane, but as always the usual caveats apply — check to see if there are any soft spots / delams, any dings, etc.

I’m unclear on whether or not the Sopwith Camel model is one and the same as the regular Camel. For example, see below for a picture of an old Morey-Pope ad that clearly refers to a Camel model, with no mention of Sopwith. You’ll also see that the Camel logo is nowhere to be found on the board in the pic below. I’ll save you the Googling, if you’re curious — apparently the Sopwith Camel was a British biplane in World War I.

Here’s another example of an excellent Sopwith Camel, from surfboard collector galore Buggs, who runs Surfboardline.com (currently down, please tell me this is just a temporary hiccup!)

And here’s another example of a Sopwith Camel that I was able to find on Photobucket.

Morey-Pope Camel Surfboard
Morey-Pope Sopwith Camel Surfboard

 

The second board that is for sale is a Morey-Pope McTavish Tracker, which can be found on Craigslist in the Monterey Bay area. The board looks like it has been well used and frequently repaired over the years. It’s being offered at $500, which I think is reflective of its condition (and apparently there are more repairs that still need to be made).

These are two cool Transition Era designs from a couple of legendary surfboard builders — including, of course, Australian shaper Bob McTavish’s influence on the Tracker! Hope you enjoyed this comparison of two cool boards from a storied surfboard brand of yesteryear.

Tracking Bob McTavish

This thing is in far from great condition, but at the risk of overusing this phrase, it is a cool piece of surfboard history.

Aussie shaper Bob McTavish claims to have shaped the first ever shortboard in California history in early 1968. Here is an excellent article / interview in Liquid Salt Magazine that details the history of a surfboard whose behind the scenes creation story reads like a who’s who of surfing. Earlier in the season on Hawaii’s North Shore, McTavish had taken one of Gerry Lopez’s boards and cut it down from 9′6″ to 8′6″. He then took some feedback from Dick Brewer, and during a stay at George Greenough’s house while surfing nearby Rincon, McTavish shaped a board that helped usher in the shortboard revolution. That board – known as the Rincon Tracker – later went for sale at a Randy Rarick auction. McTavish wrote a blog post about this board which you can read here.

Photo Credit: Liquid Salt

Shortly afterwards, McTavish struck a deal with Morey-Pope to make a shortboard model named the Tracker. You can see an example here, which I found on Craigslist in San Diego. The board isn’t in fantastic condition, but it is water tight, and the current price is $200.

According to Stoked-n-Board, McTavish actually shaped some of these boards as well, from 1968 to 1970. The Tracker model was produced from 1968 to 1972, which suggests that there are Trackers made that weren’t necessarily McTavish handshapes.

I did some more internet sleuthing and found an entire Picas album for the board when it went for sale a few years back. This reveals that a fin was glassed onto the W.A.V.E. Set fin box, which is an unfortunate bit of aftermarket modification.

If you want more information on McTavish, I can’t recommend Surf Research enough. Their entry on McTavish has some great pictures of his older boards, as he has shaped for many labels other than Morey-Pope. Surf Research has a great example here of a tracker shape that McTavish made for Aussie label Keyo.

This board isn’t perfect by any stretch, but if you’re interested, check it out here.

Hollow Feeling: W.A.V.E Surfboards

The 1970s saw a lot of funky surfboard designs. Even by that decade’s standards, though, the infamous W.A.V.E. hollow surfboards stand out as one of the more interesting experiments to have been brought to market.

W.A.V.E. – an acronym, of course, standing for “Water Apparatus & Vehicular Engineering” – was the brainchild of Karl Pope and Tom Morey. Pope has gone on to work on things like collapsible surfboards, and Morey – who I guess has since renamed himself “Y” – is responsible for a bunch of surf-related inventions spanning the weird, the useful, and everything in between. It shouldn’t come as a surprise, then, that these two had a hand in creating one of the few modern surfboards featuring a hollow core.

Found on Craigslist in Hollywood, Los Angeles is a nice W.A.V.E. board from sometime in the 70s. Judging from Stoked-n-Board’s entry for W.A.V.E., I would guess this model is the “73 DT”. 73 likely refers to the length of the board – confirmed by the Craigslist poster as 87″, or 7′3″ – and DT refers to the diamond tail. Looks like this board was made in 1973 and 1974. You can also see pics on Stoked-n-Board’s page about the fin box and its curious dual screw configuration. No idea if the fin pictured is the original; a cursory search for other W.A.V.E. boards seemed to turn up some Rainbow fins, but your guess is as good as mine here.

I have no clue how these boards ride, but I personally think the W.A.V.E. logo in the first screenshot is so rad. It’s very 70s, and it gives the board a ton of character. Sadly, some of the paint seems to be fading, especially around the rails, but otherwise the board looks like it’s in good condition.

Oh, and it’s only $150. That seems like a fair price. I wish there were a standard price book for surfboards (it seems insane that there isn’t such a thing), but here’s a thread where people are offering double for a similar looking board.

Anyway, check out this board here if you are so inclined.