Social Media Roundup: RIP Charlie Bunger

Greetings, Shredderz! As always, here are some of my favorite social media posts I have seen over the past month. Keep scrolling for more.

I hate to start off with one of my own posts, but this time it’s important. Sadly, Charlie Bunger, one of the true OGs of the New York surf scene, passed away earlier this month. The only reason I included my own post is, well, it’s my favorite photo of a Bunger surfboard. RIP to Mr Bunger and thoughts and prayers to all his family and friends.

If, like me, you have an obsession with both Skip Frye boards and their opaque pricing, you’ll also enjoy the post above from Bird’s Surf Shed. (Roperized, for those who are unfamiliar, means the board was fixed up by San Diego local Joe Roper, who runs one of the better-known repair shops in town.) The Modern Machine is a G&S model, not a Skip outline, which Joel Tudor referenced in another recent Instagram post. Anyway, the G&S / Skip Frye board was listed for $1,200, which seems extremely fair to me.

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First gun I ever shaped, in Sumer of 1988. …30 years ago. @renoabellira was in San Clemente, building some boards @herbiefletcher SurfShop ( now @catalyst_sc ) that summer, where I worked. He gave me a little help with the outline and rocker. I took it to Hawaii (on my first trip ever) and surfed fun sized #SunsetBeach…as well as the best #Laniakea I’ve still ever seen to this day. I ran out of money and sold it to a used board surf shop in Honolulu. In 2005, on Hawaiian holiday with my family, I found it sitting in the used racks @ #SurfandSea SurfShop, Haleiwa ( remember that @crawford.eddie ! ). Ofcourse I bought it, and brought it back. Here it is now, sitting in the lam room, @catalyst_sc , exactly where is was first built. Home 🏠. #PacificCoastFiberglass #Suds #MickyT @astrodeck

A post shared by Matt Biolos (@mayhemsurfboards_mattbiolos) on

Is this pushing the limits of vintage? Maybe. Do I care? Not one bit. I hardly ever write about high performance thrusters — mostly because I can’t surf them! — but I am an unabashed fan of Matt Biolos and his Lost Surfboards label. I’ve never met the dude but he seems knowledgeable without being the least bit pretentious. Anyway, this board has some nice history, as it not only involves Mayhem, but also Reno Abellira and Herbie Fletcher.

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Surfed out Al looking at his watch, futility trying to convince Shaun that he needs to get back to the shaping room. Shaun almost smirking, “as if.” Low tide and firing. 5 minutes later Shaun and the professor are walking back up the point for another go. • These early 80’s session, “Shaun at the Con” with Al are legendary. Al has often cited these surfs as some of his most cherished surfing memories. The presence of Shaun, his board, his surfing were all out of place, not Rincon's status quo. This one seemingly basic image of two guys talking, of cobblestones and sticks, red single fins, of black wetsuits and mustaches at the foot of the cove where the trail empties out, this one simple image represents a relationship and the flash point of all that was to come. • #almerrick #shauntomson #rincon #twinfin #santabarbara #surfinglife #surfphotography #cisurfboards @cisurfboards @cisurfboards_sbstore @oneill #adayatthebeach #cobblestone #mustache #allday @cisurfboardssantamonica @cisurfboards_europe @cisurfboards_japan @cisurfboards_africa @cisurfboards_oz

A post shared by Jimmy Metyko (@metykojimmy) on

Jimmy Metyko is a photographer who has been sharing some real gems on Instagram lately. I urge you to give him a follow. He has chronicled some of the great moments in California surf history, with a particular focus on Santa Barbara and legends like Tom Curren and Al Merrick.

Finally, Pat Rawson is well worth the follow. Despite having a resume that any shaper would envy, Rawson is still going strong. He shares a lot of posts on his modern shapes and the details behind the boards, rooted in his deep knowledge of the craft.

Price Checks: Eighties Local Motion Surfboards

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’re going to take a look at the prices for two beautiful Eighties Local Motion thrusters that are currently up for sale.

Eighties Local Motion Surfboards Example #1: 6’2″ 2+1 shaped by Greg Griffin in 1982 (Link)

Here’s a example of a rad Eighties Local Motions Surfboards thruster being offered for sale on eBay. The starting bid for the board is $600, and as of the time of writing this post, the surfboard has yet to receive a single bid. This board was shaped by Greg Griffin, a Hawaiian shaper who has been at his craft since the late Sixties. I’m a little surprised the board has yet to receive bids, as it looks to me like a prime example of an Eighties thruster. The airbrush on the deck and the bottom is gorgeous, and Griffin is a well-known shaper with tons of experience. In addition, the surfboard looks to be in very good condition. A lot of eBay auctions don’t heat up until the end, and with two days left it’s possible that prospective bidders are just waiting this one out.

Eighties Local Motion Surfboards Example #2: 5’9″ Channel Bottom Shaped by Pat Rawson, $400 (Link)

This board has been on Craigslist for the past few weeks, and frankly, I’m a little surprised that it’s still up for sale. To me, it ticks a lot of the boxes: you have a colorful airbrush, some rad logos, and of course, shaping pedigree courtesy of Pat Rawson. Rawson has an impeccable resume as a surfboard shaper. As a bonus, Rawson is also a great follow on Instagram.

Eighties Local Motion Surfboards Pat Rawson Signature.jpg
Close up of Pat Rawson’s signature on the Eighties Local Motion 2+1 Thruster

The Eighties Local Motion surfboard above isn’t perfect. You can see some discoloration on the bottom of the board, and it’s clear that one of the glass-on side bites has had some work done. Still, though, the surfboard is in great condition, and I’m surprised no one has snapped it up for $400. Maybe at 5’9″ it’s a little small for some folks, but I would have thought an Eighties Local Motion with a neon spray job in this kind of condition would get snapped up quickly.

In conclusion, I wouldn’t say either of these Eighties Local Motions Surfboards are bargains, but I think they are reasonably priced and in good condition. I think both boards have a lot of things going for them, whether it’s the aesthetics or the involvements of well-regarded shapers in both cases. Anyway, I’ve left links to the boards above in case you’re interested in either one. Thanks for reading!