Surfer Magazine’s “Handmade 2”

Greetings, Shredderz! We don’t have that much for you, just a tip to check out a great new video from Surfer Magazine. I’m proud to say I just re-upped my subscription to the Bible of the Sport. As long as Surfer is putting out content, I’m there with some hard-earned cash — especially when it’s this good!

“Handemade 2” is the follow up to, you guessed it, “Handmade”, which I covered earlier this year. “Handmade 2” features a stacked lineup of surfer / shapers piloting some of their creations through some dreamy waves: Alex Knost, on some Campbell Brothers-inspired Bonzers; Andrew Doheny, of Slobcraft; Shyama Buttonshaw, an Aussie ripper based out of Bells Beach; and Ellis Ericson, whose recent experiments with Greenough-style edge boards were documented in the excellent “On the Edge of a Dream” project.

Anyway, enough from me: you can watch “Handmade 2” in its entirety below.

Photo at the top of the page features Alex Knost and it originally appeared on the YouTube link you see above.

Fast and Loose by Surfer Magazine: Clipz

Greetings, Shredderz! Here are some of the best surfboard-related videos I’ve found online recently, starting with a must-watch from Surfer Magazine.

“Fast and Loose” by Surfer Magazine / Quiksilver

This one is worth grabbing a seat for. Surfer Magazine and Quiksilver present a nice fifteen minute mini-documentary on Mark Richards. Before Slater came along and redefined the sport Richards was the single most successful competitor in the history of surfing. Moreover, MR won four consecutive world titles on self-shaped equipment, which is a truly mind-blowing feat. I love the fact the movie also features current day pros Zeke Lau and Kael Walsh taking some MR boards through their paces. You can actually enter a raffle to win the board Lau surfed; more details here.

“Catch Fish” by William Aliotti and Ryan Lovelace

This is a short but sweet edit in which surfer William Aliotti threads some thumpin’ Indian Ocean tubes on a Ryan Lovelace-shaped twin fin fish.

Devon Howard by NobodySurf

I really like watching Devon Howard surf. He’s the new WSL Longboard Tour commissioner, and he has the chops to back up the gig. As much as I like watching him on a longboard, I actually prefer Howard’s surfing on mid-lengths. I love the smooth, unhurried style and the way he links one solid turn after another.

Photo of MR at the top of the page by Dan Merkel. You can purchase prints of the photo here and follow Merkel on Instagram here.

Clipz: Ingleby Family Heirlooms and More

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we’ve got an assortment of videos for you. Every time I sit down to write a new Clipz entry I’m always stoked at the quantity and quality of new edits. Choosing a handful of favorites invariably means leaving some high quality entrants off the list, like young Hunter Martinez’s new full length film “Lost In Thought.” Anyway, back to our regularly scheduled programming — keep scrolling for some video clips I’ve been enjoying lately, mostly (but not all) having to do with vintage and/or hand shaped surfboards.

Surfer Magazine’s “Alternative Lines” featuring Harley Ingleby

Shout out to Surfer Magazine, which could easily coast by on its laurels but still produces some of the best surf content out there. This clip is a peek at two-time ASP World Longboarding champ Harley Ingleby‘s family quiver. Ingleby’s father has been collecting vintage boards since before Harley was even born. The end result is a tidy snapshot of Australian surf history, a subject I wish I knew more about. (Check out the peerless surfresearch.com.au for your fix of Aussie surf knowledge.) Ingleby takes a Larry Bertlemann twin fin out for a spin, including some nice GoPro footage. He also totes around an interesting looking bonza, as they’re called below the Equator. It’s the same board that can be seen at the photo at the top of the post, which I grabbed from the video. Sadly I can’t quite make out who shaped the bonza. I figure Col Smith and/or Jim Pollard are decent guesses, given their history shaping flowing channel bottom bonzers. See here for a similar looking bonza. Anyway, Ingleby spends most of the video expertly piloting a truly out there twin fin longboard (or “mal”, if you prefer), and the result is an all-around great little flick.

Slater’s Best Day of Surfing Ever, via Taylor Steele / The Momentum Files

As the caption accompanying the video says, “Kelly Slater said if he could re-live one day of his life over and over again forever, this would be it.” Not only is Slater the GOAT, he has probably chased (and scored) more swells than any other human on earth, especially when you consider his Tom Brady-like longevity. This particular session unfolded at Soup Bowls in the Barbados not quite fifteen years ago, I believe. The Momentum Files YouTube channel posts some great selections from Taylor Steele’s filmography. I highly recommend checking it out. This particular clip originally appeared in “Sipping Jetstreams.”

“Mexico” featuring Michael February

February has been featured more than a few times in the Clipz series, thanks to his stylish surfing. This clip is no exception.

Self Discovery & More: Clipz

Greetings, Shredderz! As someone who grew up in the pre-internet age — barbaric, I know — there were few things I looked forward to more than getting a new issue of Surfer Magazine in the mail. That has all changed, of course. I still love Surfer and its peers, but like anyone else who has watched the internet take a buzzsaw to print, I can’t help but get a little nervous about the future of surf media.

There is a silver lining, however, and that is the incredible explosion of surf related video content available online. Gone are the days when you would plunk down $30 and simply cross your fingers that whatever video you bought turned out to be a good one. I think we can all agree that we’re living in a golden age of surf videos, and I couldn’t be happier about that. Without any further ado, here are some recent clips that caught my attention, as part of the latest installment in the Clipz series.

Surfer / shaper Zack Flores takes a variety of self-shaped sleds down to Mainland Mexico’s famous sand bottom points, and the results are too fun to watch. You’ve probably seen pros rip these spots, but it’s cool to see someone take some alternative surf craft for a spin in these wonderful waves. Oh, yeah…and he’s surfing switch! Ridiculous.

I am eager to see the first video from New York’s Pilgrim Surf Supply, a great surf shop located in the heart of Williamsburg. This is actually about to premier in just a few minutes, as of the time I am writing this post. Click here for more info via Pilgrim’s site.

Here’s Shawn Stussy talking shop and shaping a sweet looking board. We’re big fans of Señor Stussy here, and this is a cool and rare look at S Double at work inside of his studio.

The above clip has absolutely nothing to do with surfboard design, vintage sticks, or alternative surf craft. But it does feature John John Florence absolutely destroying J Bay’s famous right hand walls. The surfing is ridiculous enough on its own, but when you consider the entire clip was sourced from one single session in 2017, that’s the moment in which you realize Florence is probably a cyborg sent back in time to change the future of surfing.

Occy Reads Surfer Magazine: Sagas of Shred

Leave it to good ol’ Occ to not overthink things! This ad, which ran in the December 1986 issue of Surfer Magazine (Vol 27, No 12), absolutely kills me. I also happen to think it’s a good summary of Occy’s considerable, offbeat charm. (For more Occy and Sagas of Shred, see here and here). Last, but not least, it’s also a great reminder of why Surfer Magazine has earned its title as “the Bible of the sport.” It’s no secret that the media business has been hit hard as of late, and sadly, times are looking tough for Surfer. The iconic magazine saw a round of layoffs earlier this month, and there are rumors that Surfer’s parent company is set to be acquired by AMI, which might be in a bit of trouble itself.

But rather than dwell on Surfer Magazine’s uncertain future, I’d like to celebrate all the incredible content it has put out over the years, including the ads that get posted here every Thursday evening. (It’s not too late to subscribe, either.) Almost all of the content in Sagas of Shred comes about from scanning ads from back issues of Surfer Magazine. This, of course, doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface of all the wonderful editorial output over the years, which has single handedly helped shape surf culture into what it is today. I don’t pretend to know the future of the media business, or how that relates to surfing, but it’s my sincere hope that Surfer Magazine continues to publish the same high quality content for many years to come.

Shed Sessions: Newport Beach Edition

Greetings, Shredderz! Today’s post features Bird Huffman, owner of the legendary’s Bird’s Surf Shed down in San Diego. If you haven’t paid pilgrimage to the Shed yet, you should. The Shed is stocked full of an incredible array of vintage boards and staff members are personable and knowledgeable.

Bird has also been hosting a great series for Surfer Magazine titled “Shed Sessions.” Each Session takes a crew of surfers from a certain area and then hooks them up with some vintage boards, all of which have a historical connection to the featured location, and films the results. The most recent Shed Session features some Newport Beach rippers taking a couple of Orange County gems through their paces.

There’s a beautiful Dyno sting — shout out to Bird for the proper nomenclature — that looks really fun in the small but hollow beachbreak testing grounds. The next board is a Robert August swallowtail single fin, which looks very similar to a board I wrote about recently.

The star of the show, though, is a Shawn Stussy-shaped Russell Surfboards single fin. As longtime readers may know, I love Stussy’s boards in general. It’s hard to argue with a classic Eighties Stussy thruster, but I may love the Russell single fins from the Seventies just as much. For one, they aren’t as common.

Russell Shawn Stussy Logo.png
Close up of the logo of the Russell / Stussy board featured in the Shed Sessions video. Like Bird, I have never seen this combo before.

I love this Russell Surfboards Stussy shape because you can see the beginnings of what would go on to become one of the most famous streetwear brands ever. In the photo above, which is a screengrab from the video, you can see an early version of the Stussy logo. As Bird mentions in the video, I have never seen another Russell board with a Stussy logo. I have seen other Russell boards that were signed by Stussy, and I have also seen Stussy boards with early versions of the logo that pre-date the famous script, but the combo above is unusual.

Surfer Magazine has produced a bunch of Shed Sessions episodes, and I urge you to check out the entire run. It’s a great series featuring some beautiful old boards paired with great surfing and even some history, too.

Vintage Harbour Surfboards Ad: Sagas of Shred

Greetings, Shredderz! Welcome to the latest installment of Sagas of Shred, where we take a peek back at surf history. Today’s entry is short and sweet: nothing more to see here than an old Harbour Surfboards ad from an old issue of Surfer Magazine (Dec. – Jan. 1963 / 1964, Vol. 4 No. 6). There are only a few more days to catch the Harbour Surfboards exhibit at the Surfing Heritage and Cultural Center, so hurry up and head over before October 7th, when it all ends.

Vintage Yater Ad from Surfer Magazine: Sagas of Shred

Vintage Yater Surfboards ad from a 1960s issue of Surfer Magazine

Greetings, Shredderz! It’s Thursday, and that can mean only one thing: it’s time for another “Sagas of Shred” entry. Today’s post features a name that has appeared many times on this blog: Reynolds “Renny” Yater. Yater has been shaping fine surf craft for upwards of fifty years (!) from his home base in Santa Barbara. I thought it would be interesting to take a look at a vintage Yater ad or two as a way of examining Renny’s long and distinguished career as one of California’s pre-eminent board builders.

As a relative newcomer to the cult of Yater Surfboards, I have embraced the heritage of the brand with the zeal of a recent convert. To me, Yater Surfboards and its namesake always had a classy quality that could not have been further from the Orange County surf industrial complex (which, by the way, I enjoy as well). Yater Surfboards embodies the best of old school cool, whether it’s the clean lines of its boards, the spare logos, or the wonderfully minimalist website.

Vintage Yater Ad
Yater ad from Surfer Magazine Dec. – Jan. 1963/1964 (Vol. 4 No. 6). I love how straightforward the copy is. It makes me wanna call up Yater and order a board right now!

I came across the vintage Yater ad pictured above and I was immediately struck by the earnestness — dare I say seriousness? — of the copy. I have never met Renny, but the ad fits in neatly with the mental image I have of the man: a consummate craftsman who is committed to shaping high quality surfboards.

I think the ad would be just as effective today (though it might need an area code for the phone number!), especially considering Yater’s reputation has only grown in the five plus decades since the ad ran in Surfer Magazine. The tone is understated and humble, but confident in its convictions. The Yater ad, much like Yater’s boards, speaks to the undeniable fact that quality is timeless.

Vintage Yater Ad 1
Another vintage Yater ad from an issue of Surfer Magazine in the 1960s. Notice the old school font on the Yater script. This ad first appeared in Surfer Magazine June-July 1963 (Vol. 4 No. 3).

The second Yater ad, pictured above, is a nice glimpse into surfboard advertisements of the 1960s. I love seeing the older terms — note how the ad refers to the stringers as “center strips!” I love how the Santa Barbara Surf Shop “almond” logo is repurposed to show a close-up of the board’s construction. A lot of ads from this era were either black and white or printed with a single color, and the yellow makes it stand out from the pack.

Thank you for taking the time to read this entry in Sagas of Shred, and I hope you tune in next week!

Photo at top of the page: Renny Yater at the Hollister Ranch, taken by John Severson. Photo via Surfer Magazine

 

RIP John Severson

John Severson, the founder of Surfer Magazine, passed away in his sleep on Friday night. This humble little blog wouldn’t exist today if it weren’t for Severson and his contributions to surfing culture.

There are much better ways to measure Severson’s impact than by referencing the existence of websites that have a tongue-in-cheek ‘z’ in their names, however. Severson not only established the most influential publication in surfing history, he was a talented surfer, a writer, a filmmaker, and an artist, too. Surfer has a fitting eulogy to the man on their website, which honors his legacy far better than I ever could. Instead, here’s a collection of some of my favorite Severson images. RIP, Mr. Severson, and thank you for everything.

Surfer Magazine February 1963 Cover by John Severson
February / March 1963 issue of Surfer Magazine, featuring a painting done by Severson himself. Photo via ArtNews.com

John Severson Surf Classics Poster
Poster for “Surf Classics”, a Severson movie. Image via Klat Magazine

John Severson Sunset Beach
Severson surfing Sunset Beach, North Shore of Oahu. Picture via surferart.com, which is Severson’s personal website (note that site has been updated to reflect his passing)

Greg Noll at Pipeline by John Severson
It’s only fitting that Severson took the most famous surf photo of all time. Greg Noll at Pipeline in 1964. Legendary all around! Photo via 032c.com

Picture at the top of the page by James Cook Loomis; originally posted on 032c.com