Local Motion Twin Fin

Greetings, Shredderz! Today we have another Shred Sledz Submission from Bobby — a fellow Gators fan — in Florida, who was kind enough to share these photos of a sweet Local Motion twin fin he picked up recently. Thank you Bobby for sharing pics of the board! Give Bobby a follow on Instagram for his troubles, and as always, hit me up if you have a board you would like to see featured here!

I would guess the board was shaped in either the late 70s or early 80s. You’ll notice the dual fin boxes, complete with some very sweet Rainbow Fins.

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Close up of the fins on the Local Motion twin fin. Not sure if these are considered standard fin boxes. They don’t look like examples of Star Fin boxes I have seen.
Since Stoked-n-Board is still down, I don’t have an easy way of looking up the list of shapers who made boards for Local Motion during the Seventies and Eighties. The only name I know off the top of my head is Pat Rawson, and this doesn’t appear to be a Rawson shape based off the signature.

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Close up of the signature on the Local Motion twin fin. Anyone have any guesses as to who this might be?

Regardless, this Local Motion twin fin is a super sweet board. First, the aesthetics of the board really stand out thanks to the colorful spray job and the multiple Local Motion laminates. It took me a bit to realize that there are actually two different types of Local Motion logos on the board. I’m partial to the palm tree version myself, especially in the loud pink color on the deck. I also love the outline of the board. The combination of the twin fin setup and the round tail strikes me as a little unusual (and very cool).

Finally, Bobby provided some shots of the Local Motion twin fin alongside a sick little channel bottom Lightning Bolt Tom Eberly twin fin. Thanks again Bobby for sharing your pics, and go Gators!

 

Aipa Twin Fin by Terry Senate

Greetings, Shredderz! Recycling is great for the environment, which is one of the many reasons I decided to take a closer look at a board I posted about on Instagram a few days ago. The Ben Aipa twin fin you see pictured here is no longer up on Craigslist, and last I heard, the bidding was around $950. It’s quite an increase considering the original asking price was a cool $200, but after what I’m guessing was a parade of very interested buyers, the seller put two and two together.

I can’t say I’m totally shocked, given the awesome colors and laminates on the board. There are a few dings here and there, but otherwise it’s in great condition. It looks like these are Star System fins but I’m not 100% certain. If I had to guess I would say the Aipa twin fin was shaped during either the late 1970s or early 1980s.

What did throw me for a bit of a loop was the fact the Aipa twin fin was shaped by Terry Senate and not Ben Aipa. I have never seen a Senate-shaped board with Aipa logos, but after doing a little digging online, I was able to find this one on The Surfboard Project.

Aipa Twin Fin by Terry Senate 5
Close up of the signature on the Aipa twin fin. As you can see, it is clearly signed by Terry Senate.

Terry Senate is a San Clemente-based shaper who makes boards under his own label. Previously, Senate also did a ton of work for Infinity Surfboards. Anecdotally, it seems like a decent number of these Infinity / Senate boards pop up here and there on Craigslist in Southern California. I also absolutely love this Infinity / Senate 80s thruster, which I posted about on Instagram a few weeks back.

The San Clemente Times ran a brief profile on Senate that mentions how he studied under both Steve Boehne (who ran Infinity) and Ben Aipa. The article suggests that Boehne and Aipa tutored Senate simultaneously. Given Boehne’s Infinity Surf Shop was based out of Huntington Beach, this leads me to believe Aipa must have been shaping out of Orange County for some period of time. I suppose it’s possible that Senate could have shaped some boards during some trips to Hawaii, but I’m not certain.

Either way, the Aipa twin fin featured here is an awesome board (and the script Aipa laminates on the rails are an awesome and underutilized touch!) The ~$950 price tag, if reports are accurate, speaks to the collectibility of Aipa boards, even in cases when the boards were quite clearly shaped by other shapers.

Shred Sledz Presents: 3/19 Weekend Grab Bag (Pavel / Lis, Rick, Weber, Hobie)

Greetings, Shredderz! As your weekend comes to a close (it’s almost midnight here in California), here’s a selection of a few cool boards I saw for sale over the past few days.

Rich Pavel / Steve Lish 5’8″ Fish on Craigslist

This thing has already been sold, so there’s no link. It went for $700. This is a MUCH cleaner example of a Pavel / Lis / Choice fish than the one I featured a little while ago. This one has some really cool touches, like those glassed-on wooden hatchet fins, and a nifty older Moonlight Glassing logo.

This board is no longer for sale, but there are some nice reference points. First, Surfy Surfy has an old blog post on another Pavel / Lis / Choice board that was shaped in 1979. It looks very similar to the one above.

Finally, there’s another Pavel / Lis / Choice fish for sale in the Inland Empire, which you can find here. It looks very similar, but I think it’s overpriced at $1K. I believe the date on this board is wrong as well — I tend to believe sometime in the late 1970s or early 1980s is more accurate. Two other notes: the Inland Empire board was glassed at Diamond Glassers and it has a Clark Foam logo, so we know it’s pre-2005 at least (when Clark went out of business).

Hobie Silver Bullet on eBay

This thing is in impeccable condition. It might take a bold surfer to show up to a crowded lineup with this bright pink paint job and the heart-shaped patch on the deck, but that’s a small price to pay for a board in such great shape. The poster claims this was purchased in 1972 as an older stock board and was never surfed. It certainly looks all original. Sadly, it’s hard to find reliable info on Hobie boards online. The board is listed as 8’4″, and it looks like the Silver Bullet model was produced at least beginning in 1969. Check out the rad advertisement below. The only catch? The board is listed at $2,450…hope you brought your piggy banks with you.

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Rick Longboard w/Atomic Logo on eBay

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I’d like to say one thing up front: the board at that link is in terrible condition. The price is indefensible, too. With that said, the board has a cool checkerboard fin, and it sports a variant of a classic Rick logo I haven’t seen before (see above). The logo above has atomic rings above it, a la the classic Greg Noll marque. Any time I find a logo that doesn’t appear on Stanley’s Surfboard Logos or Stoked-n-Board, I consider it a success.

1971 Weber Single Fin on Craigslist (Orange County)

The price on this bad boy is steep — $1400. But it’s in beautiful condition, and I just have a soft spot for the clean lines of 70s single fins. I love the contrast between the green pin lines and the yellow color on the  rails and the bottom.

Lightning Bolt: Rory Russell

Obligatory Lightning Bolt post alert!

It’s a rule, really: if I come across any decent-looking Lightning Bolts of non-sketchy provenance, onto Shred Sledz they go. I have my own quibbles with the iconic label, starting with the insane prices ($1,000 for this board), the murky pedigree of many boards (and the numerous ripoffs you see floating around), and so on. But there isn’t a more recognizable surfboard brand out there, and in my quest to delight you all, my dear readers, I will continue to sling the goods.

This board, via Craigslist in Deerfield Beach, Florida, is a Rory Russell model twin fin. It’s got some sweet channels with airbrush, which you can see in the last pic. The owner claims it’s all original save for some ding repair, and while the board definitely doesn’t look like it has been abused too badly, it blessedly lacks the obvious sheen and plastic surgery look of full-on resto boards that I can’t get down with. I can go on about how old surfboards ought to look old, when we get these restorations that seem to be about fantasy fulfillment more than anything else, but I know Shred Sledz’s devoted readers are here for bitchin’ boards, and not some bellyaching. Anyway, this Lightning Bolt measures in at a nice compact 5′9″, and while it’ll cost you plenty, it never costs anything to look.

Check it out here.