Social Media Roundup: Last of the Decade

Greetings, Shredderz! Hope you are all enjoying the last few days of the decade. I can’t think of a better way to say goodbye to 2019 than by checking out some sweet sticks, so without any further ado, here are some of my favorite social media posts from the past month or so.

Stab Magazine called Tom Curren’s Maurice Cole-shaped reverse vee “the most famous board ever shaped”, and it’s hard to argue with that description. The Surfer’s Journal recently weighed in with some cool trivia, letting us know that there were two boards with the signature yellow rails and logo-less design: a 7’3″, along with the more famous 7’8″ featured in Servais’ timeless cutback photo. The existence of the nearly identical 7’3″ and 7’8″ boards is described at length in the Stab Magazine article linked in the first sentence of the caption.

Here’s where things get weird: in last month’s Social Media Roundup I featured an Instagram post from Maurice Cole himself, posing alongside an 8’0″ board with the same reverse vee, yellow rails and blank logos. Cole also claims the 8’0″ was shaped in 1991, along with the 7’3″ and 7’8″. Does this mean there are actually three reverse vee boards, and not two? I figure if anyone knows it’s Maurice Cole, but consider me intrigued.

Rob Machado is a Pipeline Master, he gets paid to travel the world and surf his brains out, and he’s also got phenomenal hair. If you find yourself running out of reasons to be jealous of the dude — who, by all accounts, is a super nice guy — he also gets Skip Frye boards for Christmas. This one is a beautiful 7’11” Frye Nozzle.

Speaking of things I’d like to see under my Christmas tree, add a Marc Andreini balsa Serena model to the list. My 9’0″ Andreini Serena is probably my favorite board of all time. You can see Marc posing alongside a different board in the picture immediately above this caption — note the White Owl logo on the deck, whereas the first board doesn’t have any logos. The logo-less Serena is actually a gift to the woman whom the board was named after, which makes it even cooler.

There’s no special significance to this shot, which was taken by multi-hyphenate Andrew Kidman. It’s just a gorgeous photo of a skilled craftsman that highlights the beauty and skill of hand shaping surfboards. RIP Allan Byrne.

The Campbell Brothers have been featured in the Social Media Roundup countless times now. They always have cool tidbits from their decades long history with one of surfing’s most enduring designs. Here’s an early Hawaiian quiver from 1983, featuring a trio of sweet sleds. Check out that Cafe Haleiwa logo on the far left!

Santa Barbara Throwback: White Owl Surfboards

Shred Sledz is a one-man operation, and sometimes, that means it can be hard work finding dope vintage sleds and sharing them with you all. (Sadly, one-man operation is a term that can be used to describe both Shred Sledz’s editorial staff as well as its entire reader base, but I digress.)

Part of what makes my job fun is stumbling across well-camouflaged nuggets, like this board here on Craigslist. It’s described as a “Vintage Surfboard by Bradley and White”, and while this is correct, this board is actually an old school White Owl noserider.

I’ve written up White Owl before. My interest in the brand is solely thanks to Marc Andreini, who grew up surfing White Owl boards. Since then, Andreini has begun shaping boards under the resurrected White Owl brand, going as far as to create a special 50th Anniversary board back in 2011, which you can read about on his blog. (One of these 50th Anniversary boards is up for sale on Craigslist, if you’re interested.)

If I had to guess – and I’m no expert – this particular White Owl board is from sometime in the 1960s. The logo on this board reads “Hand crafted by Bradley and White at Santa Barbara.” Stoked-n-Board doesn’t even show this logo on their page for White Owl. However, Andreini’s 50th anniversary boards clearly copy this unique text layout, as you can see here. I would also say the outline of the board looks like a pig, given that the wide point is behind center and the nose looks pulled in. More pics would help, though.

The board is listed for $400. That seems extremely fair if the bottom is in as good shape as the deck, but that’s not always a guarantee. The listing indicates the board is watertight right now, which is always a good sign.

Check it out on Craigslist here.

White Owl Surfboards Longboard

Here at Shred Sledz HQ we have a fine appreciation for all things surfboard-related. But all parents have their favorites, even if they’re not allowed to say it.

Luckily, Shred Sledz’s editorial staff / sole founder / janitor has no such compunction when it comes to political correctness. Marc Andreini is one of our favorite shapers, and that’s because he’s in his sixties and still rips, shapes rad boards, and is an all-around nice guy.

This board isn’t an Andreini, per se, but it looks to be an older White Owl board. White Owl is a venerable California brand, and Andreini has helped resurrect the marque in recent years. Once upon a time, a young Marc Andreini was a White Owl team rider himself, and the brand seems to hold a special place in his heart.

This thing is certainly boasting its fair share of battle scars, but it’s cool to see what appears to be an older White Owl, and not one of the newer ones shaped by Andreini (which are also extremely rad). The board doesn’t come with a fin, but at least it’s water tight. Buy it now is $650. It’s kind of steep if you ask me, considering the extensive repairs that have been made. I’ve spared Shred Sledz readerz the pain of having to look at all the dings that have been patched up over the years on this board, but you can see all the gory details on the original eBay listing.

Peep it on eBay, found here.